Introducing your presentation

Report
Introducing your presentation
Introducing your presentation
Think about audience at a presentation…
What do they want to know at the start of a
presentation?
What can a presenter do to get their attention
at the start?

To feel or show great pleasure

we were delighted to see her
Stop (someone speaking) by saying or doing
something:
There is a lot to tell you so please do not
interrupt me until I am done.
An idea, feeling, or opinion about something or
someone
I got the impression that he was sorely
disappointed
He wanted to share his impressions and
opinions on my presentation.
The quality of being convincing or believable
the government’s loss of credibility
A particular attitude or way of considering a
matter:
I’m trying to get Matthew to change his point
of view
to give the main facts about something:
At the interview she outlined what I would be
doing.
To be located in somewhere
Our business is based in New York.
being the person who has control of or
is responsible for someone or something:
Who will be in charge of the department when
Sophie leaves?
to have control and authority over something
or someone and the duty of taking care of it
or them:
He is directly responsible for the efficient
running of the office.
Have or include (something) as a necessary or
integral part or result:
my job involves a lot of travelling
A thing intended; an aim or plan:
she was full of good intentions
To provide a general review or summary of a
subject:
Yesterday, I gave a brief overview of the
research.
Draw special attention to:
the issues highlighted by the report are
extremely important.
to explain something to someone:
I'll take you through it one more time, then you
can try it yourself.
to speak or write to someone:
He addressed a
few introductory remarks to the audience.
to not have enough of something:
to be short of space/time
We're a bit short of coffee - I must get some
more.
to have as a plan or purpose:
We intend to go to Australia next year.
to continue to exist:
The meeting lasted two hours.
The drought lasted for several months.
to talk or write about someone or
something, especially in only a few words:
In her autobiography she occasionally refers to
her unhappy schooldays.
He always refers to the house as his "refuge".
Watch video 3.1 (other people talking about
the questions about the audience) and fill in
the table in activity 2 on your course pack, p.
10.
Sabine Kolbeck is giving a presentation to a
group of people. While watching her
presentation(video 3.2), answer the questions
on page 16 of your course book.
Sabine Kolbeck
SAVE IT
Supporting Companies Around the World
Expert view: watch video 3.3 and take notes
about each part of ABCD model. Do the activity
4 on your coursebook p. 17
Analysis: How well did Sabine use the ABCD
model? Watch video 3.4 and do the activity 5
on your coursebook p. 17
The expert feedback: Watch video 3.5 and do
the activity 6 on your course pack p. 10.
Language Focus, watch video 3.6 and do the
activiy 1 on your book p. 18
Then complete the other activities on pages 18
and 19.
VISUAL AIDS
Practicing of an introduction
of a presentation




What is a visual aid?
What kind of visual aids do you know?
What is the most commonly used visual aid in
presentations?
Which ones do you prefer to use?

PowerPoint:

Majority of presenters use it today.

They are preferred because:
1.
Cheap
2.
Easy to create
3.
Time saving
4.
Allow for a wide range of artistry (But be
careful!!!)

What other types of aduio visual aids do you
know????

Videos

Objects

Models

Photographs

What other types of aduio visual aids do you
know????

Drawings

Handouts

Brochures

Posters

Supplement presentation

Outline the main points

Serve audience’s needs, not speaker’s

Be simple and clear
because...
... AVs

support your ideas

improve audience comprehension

add variety to presentation (a break from
listening)

enliven a difficult / boring subject

help illustrate complex ideas/concepts

help the presenter to stick to the plan

A maximum of five lines per slide

A maximum of five words per line

If you stick to this rule,

You won’t overload your bullet charts

Start with an outline of the goal

Keep visual aids BRIEF


Do not read AV directly (what you say vs.
AV)
Ask audience to read or listen, not both

Account for production time (both in planning
and selection)

Check relevance to topic

Use charts and graphs

Make sure graphics are not too crowded

Don't let handouts become a distraction

Practice with AV

Seek feedback on the clarity of your AV

Check grammar and spelling


1st or 2nd slide ---- outline
Only main points on the outline slide
◦ Ex: Use the titles of each slide as
main points

1-2 slides per minute

Point / bullet form (no complete sent.)

4-5 points per slide

Key words and phrases only

This page contains too many words for a
presentation slide. It is not written in point
form, making it difficult both for your
audience to read and for you to present each
point. Although there are exactly the same
number of points on this slide as the
previous slide, it looks much more
complicated. In short, your audience will
spend too much time trying to read this
paragraph instead of listening to you.

Showing one point at a time will:
◦ help audience concentrate on what you are
saying
◦ prevent audience from reading ahead
◦ help you keep your presentation focused

Do not use distracting animation

Do not go overboard with the animation

Be consistent with the animation that you
use

Use at least an 18-point font

Use different size fonts for main points and
secondary points
◦ this font: 28-point
◦ main point font: 30-point
◦ title font: 42-point

Use a standard font like Times New Roman or
Arial



If you use a small font, your audience won’t be able to read what you have written
CAPITALIZE ONLY WHEN NECESSARY. IT IS
DIFFICULT TO READ
Don’t use a complicated font

Use a color of font that contrasts sharply with the
background
◦ Ex: blue font on white background

Use color to reinforce the logic of your structure
◦ Ex: light blue title and dark blue text

Use color to emphasize a point
◦ But use this only occasionally

Using a font color that does not contrast with the
background color is hard to read

Using color for decoration is distracting and
annoying.

Using a different color for each point is
unnecessary
◦ Using a different color for secondary points is also
unnecessary

Trying to be creative can also be bad

Use backgrounds such as this one
(attractive but simple)

Use backgrounds which are light

Use the same background consistently


Avoid backgrounds that are distracting or
difficult to read from
Always be consistent with the background
that you use

Proofread your slides for:
◦ speling mistakes
◦ the use of of repeated words
◦ grammatical errors you might have make

Have someone else check your presentation!

Use an effective and strong closing
◦ Audience is likely to remember your last words

Use a conclusion slide to:
◦ Summarize the main points
◦ Suggest future avenues of research

End with a simple question slide to:
◦ Invite your audience to ask questions
◦ Provide a visual aid during question period
◦ Avoid ending a presentation abruptly
Useful Language Structures
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Now, let’s look at...
This shows/illustrates...
As you can see from this ...
Take a look at this graph/ chart/ table.
Let’s now look at the next slide which
shows...
Let me explain the graph/picture...
The picture on the left shows you ...
Which box is...
1. in the centre?
2. in the bottom left corner?
3. in the upper right corner?
B
C
A
in the upper right-hand
corner
B
C
in the bottom lefthand corner
in the centre
A
D
Which box is...
1. at the top
2. on the left
3. at the
bottom
4. on the
right
F
E
G
D
at the top
on the
left
F
E
at the bottom
G
on the right
1.
Prepare each visual carefully and separately
2.
Check whether the visual really shows what
you are saying
3.
Make sure your audience can read the visual
4.
Find effective headlines
5.
Keep design and content simple
6.
Use bullet charts for text
7.
Reduce text to a minimum
8.
Always prepare audience for visual
9.
Present information clearly and logically
10.
Remember the rule of five
Literature may consist of texts based on factual information
(journalistic or non-fiction), a category that may also include
polemical works, biographies, and reflective essays, or it may
consist of texts based on imagination (such as fiction, poetry, or
drama). Literature written in poetry emphasizes the aesthetic
and rhythmic qualities of language—such as sound, symbolism,
and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of,
ordinary meanings, while literature written in prose applies
ordinary grammatical structure and the natural flow of speech.
Literature can also be classified according to historical periods,
genres, and political influences. While the concept of genre has
broadened over the centuries, in general, a genre consists of
artistic works that fall within a certain central theme; examples
of genre include romance, mystery, crime, fantasy, erotica, and
adventure, among others.



historical periods
genres
political influences
Examples of Genre:

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
Romance
Mystery
Crime
Fantasy
Adventure
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Prepare an introduction to a presentation by
choosing one of the cards on pages 11-15 of
your coursepack.
Your presentation should take about 2-3
minutes long.
Study the useful phrases on page 20 on your
coursebook p. 14 and try to use them as
many as possible.

You have 8-10 minutes to prepare your
presentation
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Analysis
Use the analysis checklist on page 21 while
you watch the presentation of your friend.
Self assesment:
After you complete your presentation, think
about your performance by answering the
questions on page 21 about self assessment.

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