Final PLN conference sept 14.ppt

Report
WELCOME - PLEASE SIGN INTO EACH WORKSHOP
AND GET YOURSELF A DRINK
AGENDA:
9:00 - 9:30 am - Arrival and welcome refreshments
9:30 am
- Plymouth Literacy Network presentation
• Introduction to the Network
• The New Curriculum
• Enterprise Education in the New
Curriculum
10:30am
- Break: refreshments
11:00am
- Workshop 1
12:00pm
- Buffet lunch
1:00pm
- Workshop 2
2:00pm
- Comfort break
2:10pm
- Workshop 3
3:15pm
- Q&A and evaluation
PLYMOUTH LITERACY NETWORK
• We are a team of SLEs and PLEs from Plymouth
Teaching School Alliance who provide a forum for
coordinators and teachers to network, share ideas
and develop literacy across the city.
• We develop working groups and can provide training,
INSET and school to school support through links
with PTSA - see website for CPD opportunities.
• ALL termly hub meetings for the network are free
and open to any school.
• Next hub meeting is Friday 26th September @
High View Primary school: 4-5pm.
WHAT PEOPLE THINK...
The curriculum is a return to ‘old fashioned teaching.’
It is a much harder curriculum.
There is not enough time to teach what is now expected.
How can we track/ensure progress without levels?
How can teachers be responsible for reading for pleasure?
IS THIS TRUE?
• Film
WRITING
• Perhaps the most significant change is the approach
to writing composition in the new curriculum. The
writing process breaks down into a number of steps:
• Planning
• Drafting and Writing
• Evaluating and Editing
• Proof-Reading
• Reading Aloud and Sharing
• Is this really a change?
• Planning- Phase 1- imitation- reading and learning a text
through retelling. Set expectations. Begin success
criteria construction.
• Drafting and writing- Phase 2 – innovation- where we
practise the writing elements we will need to use in the
invention. Add success criteria.
• Evaluating and editing- Phase 3- independent applicationedit and improve towards expectations. Use success
criteria.
• Proof-reading- Phase 3- check off success criteria- peer
marking-improving. Assess against success criteria
• Reading aloud and sharing- Phase 3- final version to
publish or perform.
WRITING
2014 is not principally driven by children
learning to write different text types.
Instead there is a focus on children
learning to tailor their writing for
audience and purpose, and there is
anemphasis on children using grammar and
punctuation accurately in their writing.
Purpose and Audience
•Who and why?
•Developing the writer’s voice through
awareness of the reader.
•Use your learning wall.
•PIE
•
•
•
•
•
•
GSAP
You will have to ensure this is embedded in
your teaching
You must have a progression map
Timetabled time?
Regular assessment is essential
What happens to children who are not meeting
expectations?
Adult skill level
SPOKEN LANGUAGE
The spoken language element of English is embedded
throughout the body of the programme of study.
The content for all year groups is summarised in a brief
table at the beginning.
Focus on vocabulary development and the importance of
spoken language is not just in English, but also across the
wider curriculum.
Spoken language isn’t presented as just an aspect of one
subject , it’s the medium through which children explore
ideas and ultimately learn in the curriculum.
‘reading and writing float on a sea of
talk.’ (James Britton)
READING
READING IS TREATED AS TWO INTERLINKED ELEMENTS:
WORD READING AND COMPREHENSION.
Phonics
Statutory in English schools, this is the aspect of the newNC that the
schools have prepared best.
How?
RWI
Schools own system for progression in synthetic phonics
Learning to read will be supported by practice in reading books
consistent with their developing phonic knowledge and skill and their
knowledge of common exception words.’
2014 National Curriculum
COMPREHENSION
MYTH
Teaching should start with literal comprehension, building
to inference and finally ending with the holy grail of
evaluation
FACT
• Teaching reading comprehension is not hierarchical
• Even the youngest children are capable of inferring
information from the books they read or hear.
• Appropriately, progression in comprehension in the new
National Curriculum is provided primarily through the
increasing challenge of the texts children read. It is a
mastery curriculum.
Key message given to teachers is that in addition to the difficulty of
the text, the level of challenge also comes from the complexity of
the questions a teacher asks or the tasks set, and the quality of the
answers they’re willing to accept.
QUESTIONS AS TOOLS
ENSURE YOU HAVE NOTICED AND PLACED IN YOUR
CURRICULUM:
• Far less prominence is given to non-fiction genres.
They are still present in the English curriculum but
there is a much greater emphasis on the use of
information texts across the curriculum.
• You can continue as before, it depends on your school
but the freedom to choose is great.
• GSP must be planned for- the expectations will not just
happen they have to be taught and assessed rigorously
• Performance is expected
READING CHECKLIST
• Phonics scheme- tracked closely any child falling behind has immediate
intervention
• Books to support teaching of phonic skills for children
• Wide range of quality texts for children to choose books
• Motivational tool to encourage reading for pleasure
• Technology
• Skilled staff who can listen to readers regularly without over
scaffolding
• A well stocked library
• Current children’s books
• Celebration of reading in EVERY classroom
• Obvious whole school passion for reading
• Effective assessment system to ensure rapid progress or identification
of problems
WHERE ARE WE?
The new Curriculum should be being taught now to
all year groups except for Year 2 and Year 6
Where are you?
Reading for pleasure – ideas to think about.....
Pupils should be taught to read fluently, understand extended prose, both
fiction and non-fiction, and be encouraged to read for pleasure. Schools should
do everything to promote wider reading… [Pupils] should be reading widely and
frequently, outside as well as in school, for pleasure and information.’
2014 National Curriculum
http://por.clpe.org.uk/
The Power of Reading website
THE NEW CURRICULUM…
The release of the new primary curriculum poses a
number of challenges for teachers. One of the
significant foci of these new guidelines is AT1 or
contextual learning.
It states (2013, p4) that all schools must provide a
curriculum that,
‘prepares pupils at the school for the
opportunities, responsibilities and experiences
of later life’
SPIRITUAL, MORAL, SOCIAL & CULTURAL
EDUCATION…
Recent changes to the way OFSTED evaluate performance
means that we should now be considering SMSC for EVERY
lesson.
They tell us that the consideration of this will enable us to
have a value-driven curriculum that will ultimately support
achievement (Lipson Community College OFSTED case
study).
This should not mean more work for us, we are already doing
this. We just need to spend more time verbalising this to our
children. Year 6 have loved it!
• taking responsibility = 100% quality homework
• Contextual learning = increase in motivation
• Children can talk about the point of school (Guy Claxton –
What’s the point of school?)
CURRENT ENTERPRISE LITERATURE…
Enterprise Education, as defined in our school’s Enterprise
Policy after consultation with the Department for Children,
Schools and Families’ ‘A Guide to Enterprise Education’ of
2010, includes any activity or approach which
encourages a ‘can do’ attitude while giving young people
more control over their own learning and the environment
in which it takes place. It provides opportunities for
pupils to develop core enterprise skills such as
communication, numeracy, ICT, working with others and
problem solving, as well as contributing to pupils’
personal and social development.
Why should this be just a one-off project? As a school we
ALREADY tackle many of these skills across the curriculum
(The Learning Powered School – Guy Claxton)
According to Graham Paton, Education Editor of The
Telegraph (14 Aug 2013), many businesses are
concerned that today’s education system is so exam
focussed that ‘children fail to develop basic skills,
including the ability to hold a conversation,
display a good work ethic, turn up on time and
apply basic literacy and numeracy’
(www.telegraph.co.uk); he claims that this culture
has ‘robbed children’ of the chance to develop the
core skills they will need to be successful in the
world of work when they leave education.
ENTERPRISE AT HYDE PARK…
Historically many children at Hyde Park viewed Enterprise education as a one
off project but we have worked hard to change this and it has been really
successful!
National Primary Enterprise Conference
• Robert Canniff, Director of Enterprise Education spoke about the
need for Enterprise to have a greater priority in schools; where
the core Enterprise skills are embedded across the curriculum.
Canniff reminded me that we need to invest in these skills so our
future work force is equipped to contribute to the global market
and economy. He talked of the necessity for today’s children to
be highly skilled, so that as a country we can compete and grow.
He emphasised that we have an obligation to provide our children
with skills to be more resilient so that, in an ever evolving world,
they can succeed in all areas of life, including business (15th
October 2013, BIC London).
RESOURCES…
http://www.tesguide.eu/tool-method/creative-cards.htm
● Lots of ways to integrate Enterprise into Literacy – pop up
museums, letter writing, performing plays, making books for the
library.
● Give children a purpose and an audience for their work
● Need ideas?
[email protected]
PLYMOUTH STREET CHILD PROJECT
•
charitable project aimed at initially primary (leading onto secondary) schools to
raise awareness of life in a developing country, develop enterprise skills and
understanding of global citizenship and the rights of the child.
•
aims to send teachers to Sierra Leone to support their teacher training program,
closely shadowing the PTSA ethos of developing practitioners and sharing skills,
knowledge and understanding.
•
A curriculum package to support multiple aspects of the new curriculum – lots of
contextual literacy opportunities
•
INSET opportunities delivered by returning teachers to promote and engage other
practitioners
•
Creation of community and business links that have the potential to support schools
in other ways
•
Research on the benefits and impact of enterprise on pupil and teacher motivation
to engage with the curriculum and achieve positive learning outcomes.
•
Questionnaires…

similar documents