Healthy Eating in Communities - Minnesota Department of Health

Report
Healthy Eating in Communities
Healthy Eating in Communities
Food eaten away from
home is a contributing
factor to poor diet
quality and obesity.
Healthy Eating in Communities
Each meal eaten away from home
averages 134 excess calories
Healthy Eating in Communities
 Individuals do not
compensate for
these additional
calories
 The result is
weight gain
 Access to healthier
choices is key
The meaning of:
HEALTHIER FOOD CHOICES
Healthier Food Choices
SHIP 3 limits the
definition of “healthy
foods” to four
dietary behaviors
that are most likely
to improve chronic
disease risk factors
Leading Causes of
Death and Disability
•
•
•
•
•
Heart
Disease
Stroke
Cancer
Diabetes
Depression
Clinical Risk Factors to Improve
• BMI
• Total Cholesterol
• Blood Pressure
Clinical Risk
Factors to Improve
•
BMI
• Total Cholesterol
• Blood Pressure
Dietary Behavior
Changes That Improve
Risk Factors
• More Fruits
• More Vegetables
• Less Sodium
• Less Saturated Fat
• Less Added Sugar
SHIP Logic for Healthy Eating
 By increasing fruits and vegetables and
decreasing sodium, saturated fat, and added
sugar
 We improve BMI, cholesterol, and blood
pressure
SHIP Logic for Healthy Eating
 By improving BMI, cholesterol, and
blood pressure we prevent the onset or
severity of chronic diseases
 By preventing or delaying chronic
diseases, we reduce health care costs
in Minnesota
Priority Populations
Focus Strategies Where They are
Needed Most
What is a Priority Population?
Communities that
have higher chronic
disease rates than
average
Example: Communities of Pipestone
and Grant
What is a Priority Population?
Communities that
lack access to
motorized
transportation and
live in a food desert
or a food swamp
What is a Priority Population?
Communities that
have low incomes
Priority Populations
 Focus efforts where impact is
greatest
 Reach should include as many
people in the targeted communities
as possible
 Remember that the goal is to
improve access to the SHIP
definition of healthier foods
Design nutrition strategies to increase
ACCESS TO HEALTHY FOODS
Access to Healthier Foods
You can’t increase consumption of healthier
foods until you first increase access to
healthier foods
Strategies that Increase Access to
Healthier Food Choices
Farm to Fork
 Farmer’s Markets
 Mobile Markets
 Farm to School
 Community Supported
Agriculture
 Community Gardens
Strategies to Increase Access to
Healthier Food Choices
Vending
• Sweeping changes using strict
standards might cause unnecessary
resistance
• Reducing sodium, saturated fat, and
added sugar from a baseline
assessment can be a more effective
approach than standards
Strategies to Increase Access to
Healthier Food Choices
Retail Outlets
 Corner Stores
 Grocery Stores
 Menus in non-chain restaurants
Strategies to Increase Access to
Healthier Food Choices
Concessions
 Fairs
 Parks
 Movie Theaters
 Sports Events
 Food Courts
Strategies to Increase Access to
Healthier Food Choices
Emergency Food Programs
 Efforts should influence the kinds of food that
end up in the emergency food program
 Target audiences can include purchasers,
donors, food shelf operators, and clients
 The goal is to have an increase in the number
of healthier food options.
Technical Assistance and Training
HEALTHY EATING ACTIVE LIVING
(HEAL) LEARNING NETWORKS
What is HEAL MN?
Healthy Eating Active Living (New!)
 Regionally Based
 Resource Network for local public health
agency staff
 Facilitated by the University of Minnesota
(Extension, Community Vitality, School of
Public Health, etc.)
What Does HEAL MN Do?
 Acts as a communication conduit between
MDH and local public health staff
regardless of funding
 Provides opportunity for local public health
to share resources and problem solve
 Is a source of research-based, relevant,
and real-time TA and training
What Does a HEAL MN
Meeting Look Like?
 Consist of 2 half day trainings
 Healthy Eating in the morning
 Active Living in the afternoon
What Does a HEAL MN
Meeting Look Like?
AM
 First hour MDH will connect via
distance-learning technology to
exchange important information
 U of M staff will facilitate remaining
time to provide TA/Training on a
region-specific issue
What Does a HEAL MN
Meeting Look Like?
PM
 Active Living Facilitators will
replace the U of M
 Process will be repeated for
Physical Activity content
strategies
Sample HEAL MN Agenda
For More Information
http://www.health.state.mn.us/heal
threform/ship/training.html

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