Horizon School Improvement Plan 2014-15

Report
Horizon Elementary School
Improvement Plans
2014-15
SCHOOL LAND TRUST
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
TITLE I
ESL
SCHOOLWIDE DISCIPLINE
Community Council
 Heather Nicholas
 Parent
 Lindsey Romero

Principal
Chair
Title I Coordinator
Teacher
 Rick Kelson
 Megan Askew
 Paige Bench
 Jai-Dee Riches
 Others to be elected
Teacher
Teacher
Parent
Parent
Title I Committee
 Heather Nicholas






Principal
Lindsey Romero
Title I Coordinator
Trudy Burton
Literacy Specialist
Myrlene Buck
SPED Coordinator
Ruth Riches
Parent
Liberty Kluse
Parent
BLT members will be asked to attend monthly
meetings
School Land Trust Plan ($45071)
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

o
Goal 1: Improve Language Arts Student achievement reducing the number of non proficient students by 5% for whole
school by increasing teacher understanding and effective implementation of the Utah Core including Lesson Design,
Professional Learning Communities and writing strategies
Amended goal (LA): At least 80% of students will constantly demonstrate proficiency of ELA standards in Tier 1
instruction throughout each school year.
Amended Goal (Math): At least 80% of students will consistently demonstrate proficency of math standards in Tier 1
core math instruction.
Logs/records will be maintained to monitor students progress. ILP’s will be used for those students who are not
proficient and will be monitored by the classroom teacher to determine what interventions need to take place within the
classroom. Students who are not proficient on DIBELS, Class, Voyager and Wrap/or equivalent will be progress
monitored using the district assessment tools and other common assessments as determined by the grade level.
ACTION PLAN:
o
1. All teachers will be assigned to work with Instructional Coaches to determine the effectiveness of the differentiated
instruction time.
o
2. School staff will analyze data to identify students scoring below proficiency on end-of-level language arts and
DIBELS and develop a coordinating plan to provide interventions.
o
3. School staff will have a better understanding of the expected student learning outcomes in Language Arts and
Writing
o
4. Intervention planning through PLC will increase staff ownership for meeting individual needs of targeted
students. PLC’s will establish feedback, provide ongoing common formative assessments (use of writing frames and
rubrics) and will determine the effectiveness of their teaching.
o
5. Writing instruction and practice will be a daily activity with focus on informational and persuasive writing.
o
6. Provisional teachers will have additional support provided
o
7. Staff will attend PLC conference in November if it is offered in SLC (or other conferences related to the goal)
School Land Trust Plan (continued)
PLANS FOR EXPENDITURES OF AN INCREASED DISTRIBUTION:

Salaries and Employee Benefits (100 and 200)
$10000
To be used on para and coaching support for differentiated instruction and interventions for Literacy,
Math and Writing.

Professional and Technical Services (300)

PLC training in November (or equivalent)

Implementing effective instruction practices: Big 8, classroom management and effective instructional
strategies (Tim Frost, presenter, Annette Brink man, presenter, Ken Hopkins, presenter).


RTI conferences that would be available (or equivalent if not offered in SLC this year)
Software (670)
$6000

Keyboards and mice for IPADS so students can utilize them for training on assessments
Possible purchase of Success maker licenses for school use (Reading and Math)--This would depend
on the free tools offered through the new SAGE testing
Possibly fund apps for the new IPAD lab which we have acquired 13-14 school year
Equipment (Computer Hardware, Instruments, Furniture) (730)
$18000
$8000
School Land Trust Plan ($45071)
Goal 2: Improve Student achievement reducing the number of non proficient students by 5% for whole school by
improving the delivery of research-based targeted interventions and differentiated strategies based upon diagnostic data in
all areas of the Common Core
Amended goal (LA): 100% of students who do not demonstrate proficiency of ELA standards in Tier 1 will receive researchbased interventions based on MTSS.
Amended goal (Math): AM/PM Kindergarten will teach an average of 40 minutes and all other teachers (OEK and grades 1
– 6) will teach an average of 60 minutes of Tier 1 Core Math Instruction per day
SPECIFIC MEASUREMENTS:

As we look at progress on the DIBELS 2013-14 school year, we notice a trend of more non proficient students, but we see a trend of
growth. We want 2 - 5% growth on DIBELS across all grades. Our goal is to meet 90% proficient by 2020 (as set by the
state). Teachers will be responsible to progress monitor their students and review the data during PLC meetings. They will use the
information to guide their instruction during differentiated instruction time. Intervention planning through PLC’s will continue
to increase teacher ownership for meeting the needs of students. Our staff will continue to identify and develop plan of assistance
for our target students. Progress monitoring and assessment tools will be used to assess all students. Interventions will be
determined using data, not “teacher feelings”.
ACTION PLAN:

Teachers will identify which students need interventions for differentiated instruction. Students will be identified and groups will
continue to change based on progress monitoring. Interventions will address targeted weaknesses of individual students positively
impacting their outcomes on assessments. Teachers will address the wide spectrum of levels within their classrooms. Student
progress will be shared and analyzed during PLC time and be used to improve ILP’s and our intervention process. Student
outcomes will improve due to the varied instructional strategies implemented in the classroom.

Teachers and administrators will know, understand and use the 8 Math Practice Standards.

Supporting Professional Development: Develop and understand consistent standards for identifying at-risk students. Training for
effective teaching strategies will be provided. Training on diagnostic tools for identifying student weakness such as QSI, Core
Phonics Survey, and SAGE formative/summative assessments. Understanding and implementing targeted intervention
strategies/programs and varied strategies for differentiated instruction time. Tools on using paraprofessionals in the classrooms
will be given.
School Land Trust Plan (continued)
Planned expenditures
 Salaries and Employee Benefits
$30000
 Paraprofessional support for Computers, Fine Arts, Reading and Health
 Professional and Technical Services
$5000
1.
2.
3.
UMTSS training in June (registration fee)
PBIS conference
Writing workshops for grade levels as needed (specifically as
it relates to the SAGE testing model)
 General Supplies
$10000
1.
To be used on items in the classroom for teachers. Will be
approved by the SCC. Items must be related to grade level common
core (examples would be Time for Kids, Stock Market experience, Biz
Town, Butterflies, manipulative
Professional Development Plan (Goal #1)
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School Goal: : Improve Language Arts and Math Student achievement reducing the number of non
proficient students by 5% for whole school by increasing teacher understanding and effective
implementation of the Utah Core including Lesson Design, Professional Learning Communities and
writing strategies.
Actual Student Performance Indication:
 In the 2013-2014 school year, Horizon’s number of proficient students increased overall by 5% as
compared to the beginning of the year. Horizon teachers will take ownership of progress
monitoring their own students, using that weekly data to make adjustments to differentiated
groups and show students are making improvements with the interventions they are using in the
classroom.
 SAGE end of year and intermittent assessments will be used to determine skills are being taught
Gap or Strength:
 We will continue to focus on our schoolwide writing program and use frameworks and writing
rubrics to assess our students . We will utilize technology as written in the common core for
writing, language arts and mathematics.
 Intervention planning through PLC’s will continue to increase teacher ownership for meeting the
needs of target students. Our staff will continue to identify and develop plan of assistance for our
target students.
Professional Development Plan (Goal #1 cont.)
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Staff Skills/Competencies Needed to Address Goal:

School staff will analyze individual student data to identify students scoring below proficiency on end-of –level language arts
and DIBELS and develop a coordinating plan to provide interventions.

School staff will have a clearer understanding of the expected student learning outcomes in the language arts curriculum.

A specific language arts assessment tool will be used in alignment with the Utah Core to determine student levels of
proficiency

Intervention planning through PLC will increase staff ownership for meeting the needs of target students.

PLC’s will establish feedback, provide ongoing needs assessment and determine the effectiveness of their teaching.

Writing instruction and practice will be a daily activity . Training will be provided as needed by Literacy coach or other
presenters. Coaches will use Basic 5 techniques with all teachers to improve that Tier 1, whole group instruction.

Provisional teachers will have additional support provided

Staff will attend PLC conference of equivalent n SLC
Supporting Professional Development:

Teachers will be provided a deeper understanding of the data from assessments used throughout the year and how to access
their student data on Gradebook and other district assessment data sources.

Staff will receive additional training on PLC work using Richard Defour’s book Learning By Doing.

Staff will received additional training on RTI using the 5 steps for Building and Maintaining the Framework.

Provide staff with an overview of the writing process and six traits writing and how the process aligns with various aspects of
the core curriculum.

School staff will receive training on lesson design using Understanding by Design by Grant Wiggins. Will determine what is
an essential question and form objectives based on this model.
Measures for the Goal:

Logs/records will be maintained to monitor students progress.

ILP’s will be used for those students who are not proficient and will be monitored by the classroom teacher to determine what
interventions need to take place within the classroom.

Students who are not proficient on DIBELS, Mclass, Voyager and Wrap will be progress monitored using the district
assessment tools and other common assessments as determined by the grade level.

Provisional teachers will be supported by mentors in the building.
Professional Development Plan (Goal #1 cont.)
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Potential Activity:
 School staff will familiarize themselves with Utah Core and use PLC time to identify non
proficient students using DIBELS and other state assessments. Target students with
multiple risk factors.
 Students will receive recognition for their academic proficiency gains by PLC’s. Data will be
kept on the number of students displaying these gains.
 Writing will be a daily classroom activity during all aspects of the core.
Time:
 This plan will begin in August, 2014and end June, 2015
Staff Time:
 All paraprofessionals will sit in on grade level PLC meetings once a week to determine what
is needed for the following week for differentiated time in Language Arts.
Required Resources:
 Understanding by Design by Grant Wiggins
 Designing and Teaching Learning Goals and Objectives by Robert Marzano
 Learning by Doing by Richard DuFour
 Class Acts by Gary Forlini and Annette Brinkman
 Bringing Words Together and Creating Robust Vocabulary by Isabel Beck
 Professional Learning Community Time built in to the school day to assess students on a
daily basis and build positive interventions for each student.
Impact on Goal (high, medium, low):
 HIGH
Professional Development Plan (Goal #2)
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

School Goal:
 Improve Student achievement in areas by reducing the number non proficient students by 5% for
whole school by improving the delivery of research-based targeted interventions and differentiated
strategies based upon diagnostic data.
Actual Student Performance Indication:
 As we look at progress on the DIBELS and WRAP assessment for 2012-13 school year, we see a
decrease of proficient students across the board of 2%. Teachers will be responsible to progress
monitor their students and review the data during PLC meetings. They will use the information to
guide their instruction during differentiated instruction time.
Gap or Strength:
 Intervention planning through PLC’s will continue to increase teacher ownership for meeting the
needs of target students. Our staff will continue to identify and develop plan of assistance for our
target students.
 Progress monitoring and assessment tools will be used to assess all students. Interventions will be
determined using data, not “teacher feelings”.
Professional Development Plan (Goal #2 cont.)

Staff Skills/Competencies Needed to Address Goal:



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Supporting Professional Development:





Teachers will identify which students need interventions for differentiated instruction. Students will be identified
and groups will continue to change based on progress monitoring.
Interventions will address targeted weaknesses of individual students positively impacting their outcomes on
assessments.
Student progress will be shared and analyzed during PLC time and be used to improve ILP’s and our intervention
process.
Student outcomes will improve due to the varied instructional strategies implemented in the classroom.
Develop and understand consistent standards for identifying at-risk students. Training for effective teaching
strategies will be provided.
Training on diagnostic tools for identifying student weakness such as QSI, Core Phonics Survey, and formative
assessments.
Understanding and implementing targeted intervention strategies/programs and varied strategies for differentiated
instruction time.
Tools on using paraprofessionals in the classrooms will be given.
Measures for the Goal:




Logs/records of students identified as Tier 2 students. Student achievement evaluations
Records of diagnostic assessments recorded by staff, indicating areas of weakness.
ILP records used to determine the interventions for targeted academic deficiency.
Accurate records of students assigned interventions.
Professional Development Plan (Goal #2 cont.)
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Potential Activity:
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Time:

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This plan will continue through August, 2015
Deadlines:
Order books (Bringing Words To Life and Creating Robust Vocabulary by Isabel Beck
Staff Time:

All paraprofessionals will sit in on grade level PLC meetings once a week to determine what is needed for the
following week for differentiated time in Language Arts.

Staff will have monthly professional development on the tools provided by the administration beginning with
Learning by Doing, Class Acts and Understanding by Design).
Required Resources:

Bringing Words Together and Creating Robust Vocabulary by Isabel Beck

Professional Learning Community Time built in to the school day to assess students on a daily basis and build
positive interventions for each student.

Professional Development on how to do successful differentiated groups with limited resources

CHAMPS by Randy Sprick so teachers are able to structure their classroom to prompt responsible student behavior,
and focus more time, attention and energy on acknowledging responsible behavior to enrue that they will respond
in a brief, calm and consistent manner.
Impact on Goal (high, medium, low):

HIGH


Teachers will further diagnose Tier 2 students using assessments including but not limited to: Qualitative Spelling
Inventory (QSI), Words Their Way, classroom formative assessments, phonics surveys and benchmark assessments
aligned with the Utah Core to identify individual student weaknesses.
Extended Day interventions (Imagine Learning, Successmaker) will be offered to address student deficiencies.
All teachers will differentiate core instruction during the Language Arts block to better meet individual student
learning styles and needs. Deficient skill based grouping could be done during the differentiated time in Language
Arts block.
Title I Targeted Assistance School Plan
 Student Identification and Selection (Item 18)

Eligibility for language arts services through Title I is determined by the
Utah State grade level Language Arts assessment given each spring and by
measuring all students against state grade level standards three times per
year on the DIBELS NEXT reading DAZE and the QSI word study
assessments. All students are also given the WRAP (Writing Reading
Assessment Profile) at the beginning and end of the school year. The
placement of low performing students is based on several indicators. The
State Language Arts SAGE test, DIBELS NEXT, WRAP, QSI, RLA, and ERI,
as well as teacher observation and evaluation are used to place all students
into individual and small group reading tutoring. The decisions on student
service plans are made based on these indicators in grade-level team
meetings. Students receiving special education services do not typically
receive Title I services, but can receive service if it is determined to be in the
best interest of the student. The following identifiers are used to place
students into individual and small group math tutoring: State Math
benchmarks, AIMS Web benchmarks, Murray City School District CDAS,
other group and individual administered assessments, as well as teacher
observation and evaluation
Title I Targeted Assistance School Plan (cont.)
 Research Based Interventions (Items 20-21)


Reading Interventions: Title I Students are provided tier 2 intervention through the use of
paraprofessionals in the classroom during the language arts block. Paraprofessionals meet with students
in small groups to provide literacy instruction based on their individual needs. This instruction includes
fluency, vocabulary, word work, or comprehension based on Utah core standards. This additional
classroom support allows teachers to individualize reading instruction for all students including Title I
students within the classroom. Students in need of more intensive intervention receive small group or
individual tutoring from trained Title I paraprofessionals using the University of Utah Reading Clinic
Early Steps, Next Steps, or Higher Steps research-based instruction. Paraprofessionals will assist in the
classrooms meeting the needs of individual students based on data provided by the classroom teacher
during PLC (Professional Learning Communities) time. Teachers will guide paraprofessionals and use
them as an academic support in the classroom.
Math Interventions: The AIMS Web Benchmark assessments are administered to all
students 3 times a year to monitor their math computation and concepts and applications
skills. CDAS assessments are given to all students throughout the year to monitor Utah core
curriculum academic standards. M-Comp assessments are given weekly. These
assessments, along with state tests and other teacher evaluation methods aid staff in the
identification of students in need of additional math support. Paraprofessionals will support
the teacher during differentiated math time and assist in small group instruction. Small
group paraprofessional tutoring for 4th grade math is done in a setting using the program
“Do the Math”. Students are grouped by ability and meet daily. A “push-in” model will be
used for ELL, SPED and Title I paraprofessionals based on the school schedule.
Title I Targeted Assistance School Plan (cont.)
 Highly Qualified Staff and Staff development (Item 23, 42-44):

Classroom instruction is provided by highly qualified, licensed teachers. Staff
development and collaboration with teachers occurs in faculty meetings and daily
grade level professional learning community (PLC) meetings as well as weekly PLC
meetings with support staff. The school BLT will receive training in June from
UMTSS and in November from Richard Dufour “Learning By Doing” They will then
be responsible for providing staff with specific strategies on how to make PLC time
effective for student outcomes. The coordination of services for Title I, Special
Education, ESL, and Reading intervention takes place during these meetings.
Continuing staff development will be provided on Marzano’s work Designing and
Teaching Learning Goals and Objectives, Brinkman’s word on Engaging student
learners, Dufour’s work on Professional Learning Communities, Wiggins work on
Understanding by Design and Leinwands work on Accessible Math. All staff will
participate in our Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports discipline plan and
will receive training in differentiated instruction. All staff is highly qualified and
evaluated by their immediate supervisor. Paraprofessionals will receive monthly
Professional Development from the Professional Learning Specialist. New teachers
will also have their own “Rookie Meetings” once a month provided by the Literacy
coach and the Professional Learning Specialist.
Title I Targeted Assistance School Plan (cont.)
 Progress Monitoring (Item 24):
 Student academic progress is reviewed in daily grade level PLC meetings.
Students’ literacy performance is tracked on a grade level assessment wall.
Team members attend to those students in the “At risk zone” and teachers
track these students through an Individual Literacy Plan (ILP). Students
performing below expectations are discussed and further interventions are
explored and implemented based on student needs. Students can be
switched to other groups, added to additional tutoring services, or referred
to the school’s support team if the group feels it is necessary. Teachers will
administer their own progress monitoring tests as opposed to having para
educators administer them.
 Student progress in mathematics is reviewed on a regular basis. Use of MComp’s, AIMSWEB and CDAS assessments help teachers track the growth
their students are making. Grade level teams and paraprofessionals will
work together on building common assessments related to the new adopted
Math text, Math Expressions.
Title I Targeted Assistance School Plan (cont.)
 District and School Parent Involvement (Item 35, 37-40)
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

The Horizon Elementary Title I Committee will develop a School Parent
Involvement Policy. This document will describe how parents will be
involved in planning, reviewing and improving the school’s Title I program;
how the school-parent compact is developed; how parents of children
receiving Title I support will be provided with information about the
program and the services their child is receiving; how the school will provide
assistance to parents to understand State academic core content standards
and assessments used to measure student progress; and how parent
schedules and other needs will be met in school/home communications and
activities.
Parents are encouraged to participate in the School Community Council and
PTA. A school report card indicating overall academic progress of the school
is sent annually to all homes.
Kindergarten Family Fun Nights for Title I students and their parents are
held throughout the year. Literacy and math training for families are held
on Parent Teacher Conference evenings and at other times.
Title I Parent/Student Compact (English)
Horizon Elementary School
Home-School Compact
A compact is an agreement between two or more people.
Commitment from Parents/Guardians
I want my child to have a successful school experience therefore I will:
See that my child attends school regularly
See that my child is on time to school each day
Support the school and classroom discipline program
Establish a time and place for homework and see that it is completed and returned to school.
Read with my child and let my child see me read.
Support my child’s efforts and celebrate my child’s learning.
Commitment from the Student
I want to learn to the best of my ability, therefore I will:
Attend school regularly and on time
Come to school ready to learn
Complete and return homework assignments
Follow school rules
Commitment from Teachers and the Principal
We want our students to have successful school experience, therefore we will:
Provide a challenging, safe, and enjoyable learning environment
Provide reasonable homework assignments
Provide assistance to parents so they can help their children with assignments and homework
Provide students and parents with timely and regular feedback regarding student progress
Promote positive communication between home and school.
Title I Parent/Student Compact (Spanish)
La Escuela Horizon
Compromiso entre la Escuela y el Hogar
Un compromiso es un acuerdo entre dos personas o más.
El Acuerdo del Padre/Tutor
Quiero que mi hijo/a tenga éxito en sus estudios, por eso haré lo siguiente:
Asegurar que mi hijo/a asista a la escuela con regularidad.
Asegurar que mi hijo/a sea punctual cada día.
Apoyar el plan de disciplina de la escuela y de la clase.
Establecer una hora y un lugar específico para hacer las tareas escolares y asegurar que sean cumplidas y entregadas a la escuela.
Leer con mi hijo/a y dejar que él/ella me ve leer.
Animar los esfuerzos de mi hijo/a y celebrar su aprendizaje.
El Acuerdo del Estudiante
Quiero aprender lo mejor que pueda, por eso haré lo siguiente:
Asistir a la escuela con regularidad y ser punctual.
Llegar a la escuela preparado/a para el aprendizaje.
Cumplir y entregar las tareas escolares.
Seguir las reglas escolares.
El Acuerdo del Maestro/a y la Directora
Queremos que nuestros/as estudiantes tengan éxito, por eso haremos lo siguiente:
Asegurar que el ambiente de la clase aumente el aprendizaje de los estudiantes y a la vez que sea un lugar seguro y agradable.
Preparar las tareas escolares apropriadas.
Ofrecer el apoyo necesario para que los padres/tutores puedan ayudar a su hijo/a a cumplir las tareas escolares.
Ofrecer información acerca del progreso estudiantil con regularidad.
Apoyar la comunicación positiva entre el hogar y la escuela.
Title I Parent Involvement Policy
Horizon Elementary School believes that parent involvement plays an important role in a student’s academic success and encourages parents and
guardians to participate in various ways to support their student's education. As partners in helping their student achieve, parents have the right to be involved in the
design and operation of their school's Title I program and, at the same time, have a responsibility to help their own child succeed in school.
The Horizon Elementary Title l committee serves jointly as the school community council. This committee is made up of Title l parents, teachers,
the school administrator, and the Title l coordinator. It oversees the development and approval of the school Title l plan, the home-school compact, and the parent
involvement policy. All Title l documents are reviewed by the committee on an annual basis and revised as deemed necessary.
Ongoing communication with parents is key to parental involvement and student achievement. Our parent involvement policy includes, but is not
limited to, the following methods of communication. These communications will include information on expected state, district and school academic standards,
assessments and student achievement expectations.
Back To School Night
Weekly home note
Home-school compact
Annual school report card
Parent conferences at flexible times
Additional parent/teacher meetings to address student achievement
School website
During an annual meeting, parents will be notified of the school’s participation in the Title l program including the requirements of the program
and their right to be involved. Families of students who qualify for Title I services will be notified of their student’s participation and will be given a description of the
services students will receive.
Information on curriculum standards and district assessments will be addressed by classroom teachers. Additional information on the Utah State
Core Curriculum is available through the Utah State Office of Education website and at the school office upon request. Families will receive annual reports showing
their student’s level of proficiency on the state assessments. These reports include CRT results and the Utah Performance Assessment System for Students report.
Horizon Elementary will provide various activities throughout the school year to promote literacy and math training for parents to help improve
student learning. Activities may include family workshops and materials to provide academic support at home.
Title I funds may be used to implement research-based proven practices, as well as to pay reasonable and necessary expenses associated with
parent involvement activities. These expenses may include transportation, childcare, or home visit costs to enable parents to participate in school-related meetings
and training sessions.
English as a Second Language Plan
 Vision:
 Every student receiving ESL services is given additional and effective
instruction to increase English language development and content area
mastery using an inclusion model.
 Goals:
 Instruction for English Language Learners (ELLs) will be responsive to
the needs of students and based on the framework of WIDA standards.
Its impact will be measured by student achievement data. ELL and
classroom teachers will team-teach wherever appropriate. Differentiated
instruction strategies will be provided to staff to increase knowledge of
responsible inclusion programs . This may include SIOP, REACH or
ESL lead teacher Professional Development.
 We will offer services to our English Language Learners in the regular
education classroom and will utilize a continuum of services which
support academic performance in the Utah core. Building academic
vocabulary will continue to be a focus school wide. We will use Bringing
Words to Life and Creating Robust Vocabulary by Isabel Beck.
English as a Second Language Plan (continued)
 Services for Entering and Emerging Levels (1 and 2):



Imagine Learning 4 times a week for a total of 80 minutes (k-3) and 120 minutes (4-6).
English Development block 4 times a week for a total of 80 minutes (k-6). This replaces the independent
station during the differentiated block in Language Arts. ESL paraprofessionals will “push-in” to the ESL
cluster teacher classroom and facilitate small group instruction. Lessons will be based on ILDP goals and
progress monitoring assessments.
DAZE progress monitoring twice a week (one by teacher, on by ESL paraprofessional).
 Services for Developing and Expanding Levels (3 and 4):



Invitation to attend before/after school Imagine Learning sessions for extended learning time.
English language development block 4 times a week for a total of 80 minutes (k-6). This replaces
the independent station during the differentiated block in Language Arts. ESL paraprofessionals
will “push-in” to the ESL cluster teacher classroom and facilitate small group instruction. Lessons
will be based on ILDP goals but will focus on academic vocabulary.
DAZE progress monitoring weekly.
 Services for Bridging and Reaching Levels (5 and 6):



If additional spots are available, invitation (k-3) to attend early morning Imagine Learning sessions
for extended learning time.
Support as needed for academic vocabulary.
DAZE progress monitoring weekly.
English as a Second Language Plan (continued)
 Content area Support Plan:
 Students will be combined with one ESL endorsed teacher.
 Teachers will follow the school plan for whole group and
differentiated time for Language Arts and Math instruction.
ESL paraprofessionals will “push-in” during the differentiated
block and support the instructional needs of the ELL student.
 Paraprofessionals will use ELL Treasure to frontload content.
This may be taught the week before on Thursday and Friday.
 Depending on the level of the student, based on multiple
assessments, ELL paraprofessionals will support the ELL
cluster teacher by attending PLC meetings when possible.
Mentor Program
 The role of the mentor teacher is to TEACH the provisional teacher what is known
about how to teach, COACH the provisional teacher so that their skills can be
developed in a supportive environment that promotes risk-taking, and provide
opportunities for the provisional teacher to REFLECT on the many aspects of the
teaching and learning process. By encouraging the provisional teacher to analyze
his/her own progress and to identify problems and possible solutions, the transfer
into the role of decision maker in his or her own classroom will be more easily
made.
 Horizon will use District allotted monies and have the Professional Learning
Specialist (Title I coordinator) and the Literacy Coach mentor and coach provisional
teachers. We will have a monthly “Rookie” meeting to discuss classroom
management procedures, assessment, classroom organization, planning, Tier 1
teaching strategies, and the intervention process.
 The Professional Learning Specialist and the Literacy Specialist will use the
Cognitive Coaching model. As the specialist, they will model good teaching
strategies and watch the teachers use the strategy. A dialogue will then take place
where ideas are clarified and questioned. The specialist and teacher will analyze
objectives and essential questions. We will be using the Elements of Lesson Design
to plan and organize effective lessons.
Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports
 What is PBIS?
 PBIS is implemented in both classroom and non-classroom settings
 PBIS is designed to improve the capacity of schools, families and communities to
enhance the environments between research-validated practice and the
environments where teaching and learning occurs.
 PBIS is an interactive approach to correct and improve outcomes, data, practices,
and systems.
 Research has shown that the implementation of punishment, especially when it is
used inconsistently and in the absence of positive strategies, is ineffective.
 Introducing, modeling and reinforcing positive social behavior is an important
step of a students educational experience.
 Teaching behavioral expectations and rewarding students for following them is a
much more positive approach than waiting for misbehavior to occur.
 The purpose of a school-wide PBIS is to establish a climate in which appropriate
behavior is the norm.
 There are three tiers of PBIS which will be discussed and outlined with all staff.

LINK to PBIS Presentation
Four Components to PBIS
PBIS
PositiveBehavior InterventionandSupport
TieredBehavioral InstructionandIntervention
Proactive, Preventative, Efficient
Establish
Expectations
All Areas
All Staff andStudents
ExplicityTeach
Expectations
All Areas
All Staff andStudents
Reinforce
Expectations
All Areas
All Staff andStudents
Correct
Behavioral Errors
All Areas
All Staff andStudents
Child Access Routing Plan

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