StrategicSixOverview _1_

Report
THE STRATEGIC SIX
Six Core Strategies for Instructional Design
In-service Training by Matt Foster 2013
Resources
Cain, S., & Laird, M. (2011). The fundamental 5: The formula for
quality instruction. Author.
Dean, C., Hubbell, E., Pitler, H., & Stone, B. (2013). Classroom
instruction that works: Research-based strategies for increasing
student achievement (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: ASCD.
Lemov, D. (2012). Teach like a champion field guide. San Francisco,
CA: Jossey-Bass.
Schmoker, M. (2011). Focus: Elevating the essentials to radically
improve student learning. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.
Marzano, R. (2007). The art and science of teaching: A
comprehensive framework for effective instruction. Alexandria,
VA: ASCD.
WHAT ARE THE STRATEGIC SIX?
• An instructional
design model
• Focuses on
classroom
instructional
practices
• Uses six best
practices of
quality instruction
The Learning
Space
Engagement in
Meaningful
Conversation
I Can
Statements
Affirmations &
Reinforcement
Reflections
through
Focused Writing
Responsive Interventions
1) I CAN STATEMENTS
1. Daily learning
objective
I Can
Statements
2. Daily closing
task or product
1) I CAN STATEMENTS
4 Ms
• Made First: Determines activities, not the other
way around
• Most Important: Focuses on Critical Teaching
Concepts in the district curriculum map
• Measureable: Student results at the end of the
class
• Manageable: Can be taught in one lesson,
not days or weeks
Lemov, D. (2012). Teach like a champion field guide. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
1. Daily
learning
objective
1) I CAN STATEMENTS
Studentfriendly and
focused
Simple
statement
of today’s
learning
Addressed
at
beginning
of lesson
1. Daily learning
objective
Concrete
language
Students’
proof of
learning
2. Daily closing
task or product
End of
lesson
1) I CAN STATEMENTS
• Social Studies Example
• “I can understand how the geography of Texas affects the economy in Texas. At
the end of the lesson I will write a paragraph to describe how population
patterns create businesses.”
• Reading Example
• “I can use my knowledge of themes. I will do this by:
 Identifying themes from two stories, and
 Write a paragraph about how the themes apply to my life.”
• Math Example
• “I can use two-digit multiplication.
Closing Task: I will solve problems by multiplying length times width to find the
area.”
Responsive Interventions
2) THE LEARNING SPACE
Retention
of Content
Discipline
Issues
On-task
behaviors
“Teaching or monitoring in close proximity to one student, or
a small group of students, or the entire classroom full of
students” (Cain & Laird, 2011, p. 45).
2) THE LEARNING SPACE
Teacher
Work
Area
Teacher’s
desk
At the
computer
Email;
paperwork
Lecture
Position
Front, side,
or rear of
room
Power
Zone
Proximity
to students
Apart from
students
Ensure ontask
behavior
Lecturing
Gather
formative
data
Cain, S., & Laird, M. (2011). The fundamental 5: The formula for quality instruction. Author.
2) THE LEARNING SPACE
• Teacher Commitments:
Check email before school, conference period, or after
school
Purposeful room arrangement
Minimize clutter and storage for ease of movement
Responsive Interventions
3) ENGAGEMENT IN MEANINGFUL
CONVERSATIONS
• Frequent, brief, and purposeful
• Small-group, peer-to-peer discussion
• Seed question and prompts
• Increase rigor and relevance
• Increase engagement
• Structure provided by planning, proximity, and regular intervals
Cain, S., & Laird, M. (2011). The fundamental 5: The formula for quality instruction. Author.
3) ENGAGEMENT IN MEANINGFUL
CONVERSATIONS
Frequency
Group
Size
Planned
Questions
Cain, S., & Laird, M. (2011). The fundamental 5: The formula for quality instruction. Author.
Learning
Space
Structure
3) ENGAGEMENT IN MEANINGFUL
CONVERSATIONS
10-15m of
Instruction
1-2m of
Student
Talk
1-2m of
Student
Talk
10-15m of
Instruction
Cain, S., & Laird, M. (2011). The fundamental 5: The formula for quality instruction. Author.
3) ENGAGEMENT IN MEANINGFUL
CONVERSATIONS
• Ways to Use Meaningful Conversations
1. In your own words: Pairs/groups summarize or explain
2. Take a stand: Pairs/groups discuss whether they agree or disagree
3. Name the Steps: Pairs discuss how to do it
4. Making connections: Pairs/groups compare and contrast
• To their personal interests
• To other subject areas
• To previously learned content
• To real-life applications
• Between two sources (teacher example vs. student; textbook vs.
online; novel vs. movie)
Responsive Interventions
4) AFFIRMATIONS &
REINFORCEMENT
Two
Aspects
Academic
Cain, S., & Laird, M. (2011). The fundamental 5: The formula for quality instruction. Author.
Behavioral
4) AFFIRMATIONS &
REINFORCEMENT
Two
Aspects
Academic
Affirm
• Recognize success, effort, and
progress
• Provides motivation and
commitment to learning
Behavioral
Reinforce
• Acknowledge/praise work required for
achievement
• Work includes: organization, timeliness,
studying, the discrete tasks that form a
complete assignment, etc…
4) AFFIRMATIONS &
REINFORCEMENT
Two
Aspects
Academic
Behavioral
Affirmations
• For small groups and individuals
• Clarify specific positive behaviors
that warrant recognition
Cain, S., & Laird, M. (2011). The fundamental 5: The formula for quality instruction. Author.
Reinforce
• Positive social behaviors
• Promote positive behaviors to see
more of them
• Conditioning through attention
4) AFFIRMATIONS &
REINFORCEMENT
Enthusiastically affirm when expectations have
been met.
Save praise for when expectations are
exceeded.
Lemov, D. (2012). Teach like a champion field guide. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
4) AFFIRMATIONS &
REINFORCEMENT
Examples
Non-examples
•“You did it just like the •“You’re smart!”
sample, Shayna. Good •“Good job!”
work.”
•“Johnny B! Bringing
your tools to work
today!”
Lemov, D. (2012). Teach like a champion field guide. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Responsive Interventions
5) FOCUSED WRITING
In all subject areas, students writing about their learning.
Making
Connections
Relevance
Rigor
Summarizing
Recalling
Details
Key Ideas
A Natural
Closing
Task
Brief
Formative
1-10
minutes
WRITE CRITICALLY
Ways to Use Critical Writing
1. During segments of notetaking, have students “put it in
their own words”
2. Summarizing how to do a skill
or steps to solve a problem
3. Summarizing information read
or discussed
4. Identifying similarities and
differences between
ideas/concepts or between
two processes.
5. Making connections
• To students’ personal interests
• To other subject areas
• To previously learned content
• To real-life applications
6. Increase rigor
• Have students explain in
writing how information is
organized
• Ask students to generate
hypotheses using new
information
Responsive Interventions
6) RESPONSIVE INTERVENTIONS
Meeting
Student Needs
Check for
understanding
Ongoing/
During
instruction
Closing Tasks
Make
adjustments
Give
feedback
Re-learning &
re-teaching
Daily lesson
plans are
designed to
include tasks
anchored on
these six
strategies.
Responsive Interventions

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