Project Based Learning Powerpoint

Report
Presenters: Tania Crane
“Project work in the curriculum promotes
children’s intellectual development by
engaging their minds in observation and
investigation of selected aspects of their
experiences and environment, ideally those
aspects worthy of their attention and energy”
(Katz and Chard, 2)
Katz, Lillian & Sylvia Chard. Engaging Children’s Minds: The Project Approach 2nd Edition. Ablex
Publishing Corporation. Stamford: Connecticut.






Is an instructional method centered on the learner
Allows in-depth investigation of a topic worth
learning more about
Learners represent what they know through a
personally-meaningful artifact
Students have more autonomy over what they learn
and take more responsibility for their learning
Learners shape their project to fit their own interest
and abilities
Enables the expression of diversity in learners, such
as interest, abilities and learning styles
Getting a Grip on Project-Based Learning: Theory, Cases and Recommendations- Michael M. Grant

Katz & Chard use the term project to refer to
an “indepth study of a particular topic,
usually undertaken by a whole class working
on subtopics in small groups, sometimes by a
small group of children within the class, and
occasionally by an individual child” (Katz and
Chard, 2).
Katz, Lillian & Sylvia Chard. Engaging Children’s Minds: The Project Approach 2nd Edition. Ablex
Publishing Corporation. Stamford: Connecticut.


A key feature of a project, according to Katz and
Chard is that it is an investigation—where
children are seeking answers to questions that
are formulated by themselves or in cooperation
with their teacher and that arise as the
investigation proceeds
The exploring and investigating a topic can
usually extends over a period of days or weeks
depending on the children’s age and nature of
the topic
Katz, Lillian & Sylvia Chard. Engaging Children’s Minds: The Project Approach 2nd Edition. Ablex Publishing
Corporation. Stamford: Connecticut.






“To cultivate the life of the young child’s mind” (Katz & Chard, 5)
Encourages students to pose questions, pursue and solve
puzzles, and increase their awareness of significant phenomena
around them
“Children’s minds are engaged in ways that deepen their
understanding of their own experiences and environment and
thereby strengthen their confidence in their own intellectual
powers” (Katz & Chard, 7).
…are for adults and children to experience their lives together
…are for the children to experience the class as a community
…are for teachers themselves to experience their work as
engaging and challenging
Katz, Lillian & Sylvia Chard. Engaging Children’s Minds: The Project Approach 2nd Edition. Ablex Publishing
Corporation. Stamford: Connecticut.


What does Project Based Learning Look Like?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMCZvGes
Rz8


According to the Buck Institute for Education
(BIE), project-based learning has its roots in
experiential education and the philosophy of
John Dewey
The method of project-based learning
emerged due to developments in learning
theory in the past 25 years





The BIE suggests, “Research in neuroscience and psychology has
extended cognitive and behavioral models of learning — which
support traditional direct instruction — to show that knowledge,
thinking, doing, and the contexts for learning are inextricably
tied.” (Heather Coffey)
Learning is a social activity-- teaching methods can scaffold on
students’ prior experiences and include a focus on community
and culture
More technological and global society--teachers realize that they
must prepare students not only to think about new information,
but they also must engage them in tasks that prepare them for
this global citizenship
Based on the developments in cognitive research and the
changing modern educational environment in the latter part of
the 20th Century, project-based learning has gained popularity.
http://www.bie.org/

Project-based science:
◦ Emphasis is placed on a driving question to guide an
investigation
◦ In teams, the class performs similar experiments and
collects data to help answer the driving questions, and
the students help determine how the data is analyzed,
what it means and how the results will be presented
◦ This process take a considerable amount of time and
requires that students to work collaboratively and
collectively
◦ The process, in the end, is representative of authentic
scientific investigation
Getting a Grip on Project-Based Learning: Theory, Cases and Recommendations- Michael M. Grant

WebQuests:
◦ Usually are inquiry-oriented
◦ Require an engaging task or project
◦ Uses a predefined list of resources, that are prescreened by
the teacher, from:
 World Wide Web (primarily); Textbooks; CD-ROM; Videos; Subject
matter experts
◦ Focus is on using information instead of looking for
◦ can incorporate cooperative or collaborative artifacts and
guidance on cognitive and social skills
◦ Often includes an embedded scenario or role for the
student to play—or the anchor
◦ They provide an opportunity to reflect on the inquiry
process and on an individual’s results
Getting a Grip on Project-Based Learning: Theory, Cases and Recommendations- Michael M. Grant
Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 3
•Teacher either
introduces a topic or it
is selected in
agreement between
teacher and the
children
•Pool prior knowledge
on topic
•Teacher helps
students formulate
inquiry questions
•Discussions,
conducting
investigations,
classroom visitors
•Teachers are enabling
students to learn new
information
•encourage
independent work;
support and
encouragement when
needed
•Classroom visitors
•Teacher may collect
related books, objects
or artifacts for
children to study
•Teacher helps
students bring their
project to a
completion
•Students summarize
what they have
learned
•Gallery walk and a
celebration of work
accomplished







An introduction to “set the stage” or anchor the activity
A task, guiding question or driving question
A process or investigation that results in the creation of
one or more sharable artifacts
Resources, such as subject-matter experts, textbooks and
hypertext links
Scaffolding, such as teacher conferences to help learners
assess their progress, computer-based questioning and
project templates
Collaboration, including teams, peer reviews and external
content specialists
Opportunities for reflection and transfer, such as
classroom debriefing sessions, journal entries and
extension activities
Getting a Grip on Project-Based Learning: Theory, Cases and Recommendations- Michael M. Grant
http://www.ncsu.edu/meridian/win2002/514/
holocaust

Getting a Grip on Project-Based Learning: Theory, Cases and Recommendations- Michael M.
Grant










Topic selection
Facilitator
To provide expertise and specialized resources
Helping children with difficulties they are likely to encounter
Advisor
Modeling inquiring disposition
Teachers can help children to adopt criteria or develop rubrics for
evaluating their efforts by encouraging them to think about whether the
work is as clear, detailed, accurate or as complete as it could be
Teachers can encourage children to create second or third drafts of how
they wish to display findings
A teacher can indicate his/her criteria as to how they are going to assess
the students work
Debriefing learners
Katz, Lillian & Sylvia Chard. Engaging Children’s Minds: The Project Approach 2nd Edition. Ablex Publishing Corporation. Stamford:
Connecticut.
Third Grade Classroom Teacher notes:
“By giving children the tools and opportunities
to self-assess and self-evaluate their work,
we are teaching children to become
responsible for their learning and to be
responsible for what is expected of them”
(Katz & Chard, 17).



work in small, collaborative groups in the
project-based learning model
Self managers
◦ Find sources
◦ Conduct research
◦ Hold each other responsible for learning and the
completion of tasks throughout



Ask thought provoking questions
To ask for assistance
Be motivated and responsible for their own
learning and the learning of others

Project-based learning can involve, but is not
limited to:
◦
◦
◦
◦
◦
◦
◦
◦
◦
Asking and refining questions
Debating ideas
Making predictions
Designing plans and/or experiments
Collecting and analyzing data
Drawing conclusions
Communicating ideas and findings to others
Asking new questions
Creating artifacts
Systematic Instruction
Project Work
The teacher focuses on helping
children acquire skills
The teacher provides opportunities
for the children to apply skills
The children are motivated by their Children’s interest and
desire to please the teacher and
involvement promote effort and
obtain rewards
motivation
The teacher chooses learning
activities and provides materials at
the appropriate instructional level
The children choose from a variety
of activities provided by the
teacher; they determine their own
level of challenge at which to work
The teacher is the expert; the
teacher addresses children’s
deficiencies
The children are the experts; the
teacher capitalizes on the
children’s proficiencies
The teacher is accountable for the
children’s learning, progress and
achievement
The children and teacher share
accountability for learning and
achievement

Constructivism
◦ Explains that individuals construct knowledge
through interactions with their environment, and
each individual’s knowledge construction is
different
◦ Through conducting investigations, conversations
or activities, an individual is learning by
constructing new knowledge by building on their
current knowledge


Constructionism
◦ Posits that individuals learn best when they are
constructing an artifact that can be shared with others
and reflected upon (i.e. play, poems)
◦ Artifacts must be personally meaningful, where
individuals are most likely to become engaged in
learning
By focusing on the individual learner, projectbased learning strives for “considerable
individualism of curriculum, instruction and
assessment—the project is learner-centered”
Getting a Grip on Project-Based Learning: Theory, Cases and Recommendations- Michael M. Grant


Project-Based Learning= Differentiated Learning
Every student is different (i.e. has different
background knowledge, forms and degrees of
intelligence, learning styles, interests, goals, and
motivation)
◦ teaching all students at the same level and in the same
way, and maintaining the same expectations, and using
the same reinforcement structures for all students
makes little sense


teachers can differentiate instruction (i.e., use a
wide array of teaching and motivation
techniques, match expectations to each student’s
developmental levels) according to the
characteristics of each individual student
Capitalize on students talents and skill which
promotes motivation and a love for learning
You Tube Video
Math Board Games
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUDDh0Wx
bAc&feature=relmfu
School Wide Project on Gender Roles
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPVXg8fmt
dM&feature=relmfu










http://pbl-online.org/About/whatisPBL.htmx
http://www.bie.org/
http://www.ncsu.edu/meridian/win2002/514/holocaust
http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/4753
http://www.bie.org/index.php/site/PBL/pbl_handbook_introduction
/#history
http://www.una.edu/faculty/onlineacademy/State/Adobe%20Reader
/DO%20NOT%20OPEN%20program%20files/Instruction/Designing%2
0Lessons/ACTIVITIES/PBLS/Why%20use%20PBL.pdf
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUDDh0WxbAc&feature=relmfu
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPVXg8fmtdM&feature=relmfu
Getting a Grip on Project-Based Learning: Theory, Cases and
Recommendations- Michael M. Grant
Katz, Lillian & Sylvia Chard. Engaging Children’s Minds: The Project
Approach 2nd Edition. Ablex Publishing Corporation. Stamford:
Connecticut

similar documents