Comprehensive Lesson Plan for *The Mitten* by Jan Brett

Report
Comprehensive Lesson Plan for
“The Mitten” by Jan Brett –
Developing & Sequencing a
timeline
The Mitten
Essential Question
 How do readers use sequencing to understand and
retell the text?
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Topic & Grade Level
 Topic
 Sequencing events & building a timeline to assist
students in recalling the events of a story.
 Grade Level
 This lesson was can be utilized with students in
first Grade through third grade (ages 6-9).
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Learning Outcomes
 Outcome #1
 The students will comprehend and be able to recall the
definition and purpose of sequencing the events of a
story.
 Outcome #2
 The students will be able to recall and discuss the main
events of the story “The Mitten.”
 Outcome #3
 The students will be able to construct a timeline as a
group based on the correct sequence of events as they
occurred in the story.
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Multiple Intelligences
Word Smart
 Students who are word smart
may be particularly drawn to this
type of activity due to the
reading component. Each
student must be able to read his
or her designated story piece in
order to participate in the
activity. Students who are word
smart may enjoy this activity
more than students who are
inclined by other multiple
intelligences.
Number Smart
 Students who are number smart
will benefit from the numbering
portion of this activity that
represents the sequence that
each part of the story is
represented by.
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Multiple Intelligences
Continued…
Nature Smart
 Students who are nature smart
will benefit from the book “The
Mitten” by Jan Brett. The story
goes through a series of events
in which several animals gather
into the main character “Nicki’s”
mitten. This type of sequencing
would draw in the nature smart
students due to the story’s
focus.
Body Smart
 Students who are body smart
will enjoy being able to move
around in order to physically
place their slip of paper into it’s
appropriately designated mitten.
A self- checking system is
included in this activity so that
the student has to manipulate a
part of the mitten in order to
check to see if their sequenced
piece has matched its proper
mitten.
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40 Developmental Assets
Incorporated
External Assets
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Other Adult Relationships
Caring School Climate
Safety
School Boundaries
Adult Role Models
High Expectations
Child Programs
Internal Assets
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Learning Engagement
Bonding to School
Reading for Pleasure
Interpersonal Competence
Self-Esteem
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Timeframe & Materials
Timeframe
 This activity based on the
story “The Mitten” by Jan
Brett will be conducted
during a 90-minute class
period.
Materials
 “The Mitten” by Jan Brett
 12 Sequencing strips of
paper
 12 Mittens numbered 1-12
 Graphic Organizers
 Pencils/Crayons/Markers
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Procedures, Steps & Activities
for the Lesson
 Activity #1
 Read “The Mitten” by Jan Brett
 Sensory Input: The students can listen to the teacher read as well as
visually observe the pictures that go along with the book
 Sensory Output: Discussing the different parts of the book by allowing the
students to pick out their favorite parts. Have each students share their
favorite animal that was in the mitten.
 Teaching Strategies: Presentation of sequences through reading, choral
reading, taking a picture walk through the book, and allowing the students to
pass around the book.
 Learning Strategies: The students will learn how to follow along while
someone else is reading to them. Using the appropriate in-class rules while
the story is being read (use good sitting, eyes on the speaker, listen to your
teacher.)
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Procedures, Steps & Activities for
the Lesson Continued…
 Activity #2
 Discuss how to sequence events and why it is necessary in
learning the text
 Sensory Input: The students can listen to the teacher while sequencing
is being introduced and explained in context. Draw an example of
sequencing on the board (i.e. making a PB & J sandwich to show order
of events).
 Sensory Output: The students will draw their own example of a
sequenced event of their choice and will participate in a wrap up
discussion of what it means to sequence events.
 Teaching Strategies: Modeling how to sequence events by
brainstorming the different parts of the story with the students. Teacher
draws pictures that represent the order in which the events occur to
create a visual correlation.
 Learning Strategies: The students will learn by observing the modeling
of an appropriate sequencing instruction.
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Procedures, Steps & Activities for
the Lesson Continued…
 Activity #3
 Discuss the main events and the plot of the story as a class.
 Sensory Input: The students will hear the teacher walk through the main
events of the story, the teacher will show a visual representation of each
main event by passing around the book to show illustrations.
 Sensory Output: The students will engage in a correlation of words to
pictures by viewing the illustration that goes along with a particular sequence
and retell the events of that portion in the own words.
 Teaching Strategies: Have the students pick out what they believe the
main events of the story to be. Find those portions of the story and re-read
the portion that the students chose.
 Learning Strategies: The students will participate in the class discussion of
the main events that occurred in the story “The Mitten.”
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Procedures, Steps & Activities for
the Lesson Continued…
 Activity # 4
 Create the timeline of the story by placing the appropriate slips
of paper in the correctly numbered mitten.
 Sensory Input: The students will hear the teacher explain the process of
sequencing the strips of paper that go along with the events of the story.
Students will then read the slips of paper to later determine the correct order
of events.
 Sensory Output: The students will read their slip of paper in front of the
class when they have determined that their slip of paper comes next in the
sequence. Students will stand up and present their sequence and discuss
their reasoning behind it.
 Teaching Strategies: Teacher will model the process the students need to
utilize in order to accomplish their goal of sequencing the events. The
teacher will verbally affirm and assist them in the process of sequencing.
 Learning Strategies: Students will organize their events in the order in
which they believe they occur in the story.
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Strategies for Empowerment
 Strategy #1
 Encourage the students to
complete the activity by
empowering them through
verbal praise.
 Strategy #2
 Provide the students with a
wealth of knowledge and an
enriched environment where
they feel that they are able to
succeed with confidence.
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Utilizing Graphic Organizers
 Before Learning
 Have students develop a word web centered on “mittens”.
Students will tell what they know about mittens and develop
three complete sentences based on their word web facts.
 See handout for further explanation of the mitten word web…
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Utilizing Graphic Organizers
 During Learning
 Students will match an illustration of an animal that appeared
in the story with the correct number sequence as it occurred in
the story being read to them. This will be beneficial for them to
refer back during the timeline activity.
 See handout for further explanation of “The Mitten” matching activity.
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Utilizing Graphic Organizers
 After Learning
 The students will be given 4 slips of paper each. After reading
each sentence aloud, the students will come together as a
group and decide the order in which each of the events
occurred in “The Mitten.” There will be an interactive organizer
mounted on the classroom wall. There will be 12 mittens
(numbered 1-12) in which the students will put their slips of
paper into after determining which order the events occurred
in. To check their work, a dot on the top of each paper must
coincide with a dot that is sealed up on the front of each
mitten.
 See handout for further information on the interactive organizer
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Assessment that Encourages
Involvement & Choice
 Options for the students to choose from include:
 Option 1: Draw a comic scene of the main events that occurred in
the story “The Mitten” by Jan Brett.
 **See handout for further explanation of the comic scene option.
 Option 2: Write a short story using an appropriate beginning
/middle/ end following the prompt “if you had a magical mitten
that could fit any amount of people/animals/items in it…who or
what would you put in your mitten?”
 ** See handout for further explanation of the short story option.
 Option 3: Answer a pre-made question sheet that assesses the
students understanding of the story and sequencing events.
 ** See handout for further explanation of the question sheet option.
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Rubric for Alternative
Assessments
Points Awarded
1
2
3
Demonstration of
understanding
sequencing
The students do not
demonstrate an
understanding of
sequencing and developing
a timeline. The student does
not engage in purposeful
application of the material
presented.
The students demonstrate a
verbal understanding of
sequencing a timeline but
cannot apply the process in
developing their own
timeline.
The students fully
understand and can apply
the process and definitions
that accompany the
development of a sequenced
timeline.
Participation in
Discussion
The student does not
attempt to participate in
class discussion regarding
sequencing.
The student attempts to
participate in class
discussion
The student fully
participates in class
discussion and develops a
solid foundation for building
a timeline and sequencing
events.
Development of
Timeline
Student does not attempt to
develop an adequate
timeline in a group setting.
The student partially
attempts to develop the
timeline according to class
instruction.
The student is able to
demonstrate a complete
understanding of developing
a timeline and how to
sequence the events of a
story.
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