Breaking the Silence - Women in Peril

Report
BREAKING THE SILENCE:
WOMEN IN PERIL
21ST ANNUAL NURSING EXCELLENCE IN
LEADERSHIP AND EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE
PI THETA CHAPTER, UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS
ELEANOR MANN SCHOOL OF NURSING
Carolyn Mosley, PhD, RN, CS, FAAN, ANEF
April 16, 2012
NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
STATISTICS
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A women is beaten every 12 seconds in the US
35% of all emergency room visits are a result of
domestic violence
Crimes are committed by men against women
in 92% of all domestic violence cases
Of those who abuse their partner, over 65% also
physically and/or sexually abuse the children
Each day 4 women die as a result of abuse
Each day 3 children die as a result of abuse
ARKANSAS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE STATISTICS
YEAR
2000
2001
RANK
7th in Nation
7th in Nation (Ranked 1st
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
11th in Nation
18th in Nation
12th in Nation
6th in Nation
8th in Nation
4th in Nation
7th in Nation
in Nation for African American Female Domestic Related
Deaths)
(Violence Policy Center Report, When Men Murder Women, 2010)
SEPTEMBER 15, 2009 ARKANSAS SUMMARY
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE COUNT
606 victims served in one day
• 71% - individual support/advocacy
• 63% - emergency shelter
• 46% - group support/advocacy
• 43% - transportation
• 37% - children’s support/advocacy
• 31% - court accompaniment/advocacy
• 23% - advocacy related to public
benefits/TANF/welfare
• 20% transitional housing
• Answered 7 hotline calls every hour
UNMET REQUESTS FOR SERVICES
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60% - not enough funds for needed
programs and services
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26% - not enough staff
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20% no available beds or funding for hotels
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11% - limited funding for translators,
bilingual staff, or accessible equipment
RISK FACTOR FOR THE PERPETRATOR
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Seeing or being a victim of violence as a child
Using drugs and/or alcohol, especially drinking
heavily
Being violent or aggressive in the past
Not having a job or other life events that cause stress
Low academic achievement
Marital conflict or instability
Traditional male norms/societal norms supportive of
violence
Depression
Personality disorders
Weak community sanctions
Note: These are just a few risk factors.
FEMALE VICTIMS OF VIOLENCE AND
PERCENT INCREASE BY NETWORK-’04-’09
Network
% Increase
CBS
119%
NBC
192%
FOX
105%
ABC
39%
EFFECTS OF ABUSE ON CHILDREN
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Powerless
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Confused
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Angry
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Guilty
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Afraid
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Alone
WHY DO THE ABUSED STAY?
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Fear of the batterer’s violence
Immobilization by psychological and/physical
trauma
Connection to perpetrator through children
Belief in cultural, family or religious values
Continual hope and belief that violence will end
or he will change
Belief that batter will commit suicide
Lack of funds
Lack of real alternatives for employment and
financial assistance
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IMPACT ON
HEALTH
Physical
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Cuts, scratches, bruises, and welts
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Internal bleeding, head trauma, broken bones
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Disfigurement, disability
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Abdominal/thoracic injuries,
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Ocular damage
Psychological/Emotional
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Panic attacks
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Post traumatic stress disorder
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Eating and sleep disorders
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Inability to trust others
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Somatic complaints
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Depression, anxiety, suicidal behavior
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Substance abuse
ECONOMIC COSTS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
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ED visits
Outpatient visits
Overnight in hospital
Physician visits
Dental visits
Ambulance/paramedic
services
Physical therapy visits
Cost
458, 096
306, 051
758, 066
860,346
216,955
85,070
974,693
$8.3 billion
(Cost of Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in the United States,
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, March 2003)
UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS CLINTON
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC SERVICE
Needs
• Violence prevention education
• Funds/resources
• Training for service providers
• More mental health counselors with
expertise on treating victims of violence,
and relationship building among service
providers.
Gaps
• Not enough service providers/counselors
• Not enough prevention education
UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS CLINTON
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC SERVICE
Gaps (cont.)
Lack of services for people with mental
health issues
Lack of violence prevention programs for
youth
Lack of standardized program for batterer
2011 ARKANSAS DOMESTIC LEGISLATION
SB 751/Act 1004—An act to provide for adult
abuse and domestic violence reporting. This
Act states that a health care provider may
report to a law enforcement agency an
injury to an adult that they believe may be
due to domestic violence. This report may
be made if the injured adult agrees to the
disclosure or if the health care provider
feels the report is necessary to prevent
serious harm to the adult. The injured adult
must be informed of the report and the
health care provider is immune from
criminal or civil liability for making or
deciding not to make the report.
2011 ARKANSAS DOMESTIC LEGISLATION
HB 2001/Act 1049—An act regarding the care
of pets under the domestic abuse act. This
act list new relief that the court may
provide in an order of protection. An order
may now include language that directs the
care, custody or control of any pet owned,
possessed, leased, kept or held by either
party residing in the household.
2011 ARKANSAS DOMESTIC LEGISLATION
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HB 2198/Act 1199– An act to require a law
enforcement officer to complete continuing
education and training relating to persons
with disabilities in a law enforcement
context. This act states that as part of
certification requirements of the Arkansas
Commission on Law Enforcement
Standards and Training, all law
enforcement officers shall complete a
minimum of six hours yearly on training
related to persons with disabilities in a law
enforcement context.
SO WHAT FOR YOU?
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Research opportunities that address demographic,
social, and environmental factors that may account
for variations in victimization rates among women of
different racial and ethnic backgrounds and the link
between victimization experienced as a minor and
subsequent victimization.
Research that ask what distinguishes men who are
able to form healthy, non violent relationships despite
childhood adversity from those who become abusive?
Development and testing of prevention strategies
Career opportunities working with this population of
individuals

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