Behavioral Safety by Zulekha Soorma (Envt. Mngt Consultant).

Report
1
by
Ms. Zulekha Soorma
(HSE Advisor- Environmental Management
Consultants)
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3
Agenda
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INTRODUCTION
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Any directly
measurable thing that a
person does, including
speaking, acting, and
performing physical
functions
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Development of Behavioral
Safety
 Heinrich 1930’s – 88-90% of
incidents at workplace were
caused by unsafe acts
 DuPont ‘s STOP program
(Safety Training Observation
Program)
 Chevron’s POWER
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What is Behavioral
Safety ?
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




Reflects a proactive approach to
safety and health management
Reflects a proactive approach to
injury prevention
Focuses on at-risk behaviors that
can lead to injury
Focuses on safe behaviors that can
contribute to injury prevention
Is an injury prevention process
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Principles of Behavioral
Safety
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



Focus intervention on
observable behavior
Look for external factors to
understand/improve behaviors
Direct with activators and
motivate with consequences
Focus on positive consequences
to motivate behavior
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


Apply the scientific method
to improve intervention
Use theory to integrate
information, not to limit
possibilities
Design interventions with
consideration of internal
feelings and attitudes
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The Incident Triangle
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Measured /
Reported
Not
Measured
Reported
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Serious Injury
Minor Injury
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Property/Equipment
Damage
600
Near Miss
3000 - 5000
Unsafe Acts
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
Sense

Know

Plan , Act and Maintain

Look, Speak and Listen
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Three elements :
Activator
is a person, place, thing, coming
before a behavior that encourages
you to perform that behavior
Behavior
is something you can see a person
doing
Consequence
are events that follow behaviors and
change the probability that they will
recur in future
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Activators
•Goals
• Objectives
• Priorities
• Accountabilities
• Policies/Procedures
• Standards
• Training/Education
• Job aids such as checklists, flowcharts
•Loss Prevention Guide
•Pre-Job Safety Instruction
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Activators
•Always come before behavior
•Communicate information
• Consequences can also be activators
•Prompt or activate behavior
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Behavior
•Any observable and
measurable act
•Anything you can see a
person do
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Consequences
•Events that follow behaviors
and change the probability
that they will recur in the
future
•Have the greatest influence
on behaviors
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Antecedents
Feedback
15%
Instructions
Manuals
Procedures
Feedback
Consequences
85%
Behavior
Recognition
Rewards
Punishment
+/- Reinforcement
Habit
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
Cigarette Smoking Negative , Future, Uncertain
H2S Exposure – Negative ,
Immediate, Certain
Which is the better example for
protection of the respiratory
system ?
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 Daily recognition from
Superintendent /Foreman Positive, immediate, certain.
 Infrequent recognition from
Superintendent / Foreman –
Positive, future, uncertain.
Which will result in the desired
behavior?
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Critical Behaviors and
Barriers to Safety
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The Safety Triad
ENVIRONMENT
PERSON
BEHAVIOR
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Types of At-risk Behavior
 Conscious behavior
Habitual behavior
Unintentional
behavior
BBS focuses on habitual
and unintentional
behavior
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Critical Behaviors and Barriers to Safety
 At-risk behaviors that lead
to serious injury or fatality
 At-risk behaviors that
could lead to serious
injury or fatality
 At-risk behaviors that lead
to a large number of
minor injuries or near
misses
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Critical Behaviors and Barriers to Safety
At-risk behaviors that could
contribute to a large
number of injuries because
many people perform a
given task
 Safe behaviors that need to
occur consistently in order
to prevent personal injury
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Implementation Phases
of Behavioral Safety
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Phase 1
Assess the safety culture
Phase 2
Educate and train team leaders
Phase 3
Educate and train employees about the
principles, tools and implementation
strategies
Phase 4
Monitor the progress
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The Do It Process
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
Define behaviors

Observe behaviors

Intervene

Test the intervention
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ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT &
MONITORING PLAN
Why Behavioral Safety
Programs Fail
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Lots of negative
feedback - policing
Observations not
done as required
Absence of feedback
to workers
Introduced as a
“flavor of the month”
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

All members of the
organization, from top
management to the shop floor
are fully engaged and
supportive
The system is constantly
maintained and is not seen as
a one-off
The underpinning safety
management systems and
working environment are also
fully maintained.
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