The PBLA Model

Report
Implementing PortfolioBased Language Assessment
(PBLA) in LINC & ESL
CESBA Conference, Toronto
December 2012
Presenters
 Mia Gauthier, Policy Analyst, Language Policy
Information, Language, Community Policy
Division, Integration Branch, Citizenship and
Immigration Canada
 Joseph Colonna, Language Training Unit, Ontario
Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration
 Shirley Graham, LINC and ESL Coordinator,
Ottawa-Carleton District School Board
2
Presentation overview







Introductions
CIC language training policy priorities
PBLA pilots and findings
Implementing PBLA in ESL and FSL
The PBLA model
Implementing PBLA in the classroom: Ottawa Pilot
Impact of PBLA implementation on programs –
Ottawa-Carleton District School Board
 Plan for national PBLA implementation
 Q&A
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CIC LANGUAGE TRAINING POLICY PRIORITIES/
PBLA PILOTS AND FINDINGS
Mia Gauthier
Policy Analyst, Language Policy
Information, Language, Community Policy Division
Integration Branch, Citizenship and Immigration Canada
4
National Plans and Priorities
CIC has established a set of national Plans & Priorities for
the Settlement Program for the next three years:
1. More newcomers to Canada engage early in their settlement experience and participate
actively in the settlement services they need to reach their expected outcomes
–
–
Maximize the number of eligible clients accessing CIC-funded services
Make individual needs assessment and settlement plans for clients a systematic practice across SPOs
2. CIC has an innovative and coordinated settlement delivery network
–
–
–
Improve planning to eliminate duplication among competing initiatives in a community
Promote collaborative partnerships with provinces, territories and municipalities
Maintain a diverse network of SPOs with strong organizational integrity
3. CIC can report on Program to Canadians
–
–
Strong financial accountability
Demonstrate the impact of the program through measurable and comparable newcomer outcomes
5
TEACHER
TRAINING
ONGOING AND EXIT
ASSESSMENT
UPFRONT
ASSESSMENT
Strategic Plan for Language Program Improvements: 2012 -2015
CLBLA/CLBA
/CLBPT / BTC/
ELTPA
• Analysis of existing placement tools; work toward a unified tool for all programs
• Pilot Coordinated Language Assessment and Referral System (CLARS) in Ontario
Online SelfAssessment
(CLB-OSA)
• Increase Promotion of CLB-OSA and connectivity to other CIC sites
Milestones
Test
• Continue development of CLB Milestones Test; construct pilot, develop French language
equivalent of Milestones; begin CLB/NCLC Milestones Test promotion
• Research options for computer-based testing
PBLA
• Roll out phased implementation of PBLA as a standard feature of LINC in all regions
• Work towards inclusion of PBLA training in TESL teacher training programs
LINC/CLIC
• Manage introduction by Service Provider Organizations (SPOs) of LINC/CLIC
certificates, and support similar process in BC, Manitoba and Quebec
completion
certificates
Certification
• Launch and promote the Framework for Post-TESL Certification in Ontario
• Liaise with teacher certification bodies in other provinces to introduce and harmonize postTESL qualifications
In-service
training
• Encourage the use of Tutela.ca to conduct PD activities, including user groups, webinars,
videoconferencing, etc.
6
PROGRAM ARCHITECTURE
ONLINE
DEVELOPMENT
Strategic Plan for Language Program Improvements: 2012-2015
National
repository
www.tutela.ca
Online &
blended
training
• Launch Tutela.ca, national repository of language teaching tools and resources
• Build on provincial government support for additional website features and promotion
• Increase the proportion of blended and online training to expand access
• Continue to support LearnIT2teach in Ontario and export the model to other Regions
• Implement CLIC en ligne 2-6
• Move to open source software approach and pilot universal Learning Management System
(LMS) in traditional and blended classes
BC &
Manitoba
Transition
• Ensure national program alignment of language training programs across the country (LINC,
ELSA, EAL)
• Strengthen adherence to core national program standards (Teacher certification, curriculum,
etc.)
Phasing out
LINC/CLIC
levels
• Provide policy guidance for moving away from LINC/CLIC level course organization
• Support modifications to iCAMS/iCARE to enable learner data tracking in CLB terms
• Implement LINC/CLIC level phase-out
• Adapt and disseminate Curriculum Guidelines and classroom materials
Program
standards
• Print/distribute new CLB/NCLC documents, develop supporting tools, adapt resources as
required
• Lift restriction on access to English and French training for learners in official language
minority communities
• Replace iCAMS with new iCARE system, train regional staff and service providers
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CIC Language Training Policy Priorities – in brief
 Renewing national standards through revisions to the
Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB) and the Niveaux
de compétence linguistique canadiens (NCLC)
 Supporting students to achieve their goals through the
creation of CLB/NCLC-based assessment tools
 Bridging students to the wider community by
introducing certificates of achievement in LINC and CLIC
 Supporting teachers by disseminating best practices
through Tutela.ca, a national online repository of
resources for ESL professionals
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Revising National Standards
 The CLB/NCLC provide a common framework for
describing, measuring and recognizing second language
proficiency of adult immigrants and prospective immigrants
for living and working in Canada
 CIC has contributed to the initial development of the CLB in
1996, their revision in 2000, the development of the NCLC
in 2006, and the latest revision of both this past year
 Training for assessors and teachers on the revised
CLB/NCLC began this fall in Ontario, and is expected to
take place in other parts of the country within the next
year
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Need for a CLB-based in-class assessment tool

The 2010 LINC evaluation noted the absence of tools to measure the impact of
LINC/CLIC on students’ learning progress

A 2009 pan-Canadian report on government-funded language training
recommended that Manitoba’s tried and tested portfolio assessment system
become a national initiative

Portfolio-Based Language Assessment (PBLA) is an in-class assessment protocol
that is directly aligned to the CLB framework

PBLA was developed to improve CIC’s ability to measure program impact, to
bring teachers to a common standard of practice and provide them with a
standardized approach to measure student advancement, and to support
better learning results for its students

More consistent assessment practices also support CIC’s plan to have
LINC/CLIC results used in the citizenship application process
10
PBLA pilots and findings
 CIC introduced PBLA through pilot projects in Ottawa (Oct 2010-Dec
2011), and in Edmonton, Moncton, St. John and Fredericton (Aug
2011-ongoing)
 Ontario’s Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration also co-piloted PBLA
with CIC in Ottawa from January 2011
 The findings of an independent review of the Ottawa pilot showed
that teachers assessed their students more effectively, while students
took up a more active role in their learning
 The pilots also highlighted a significant disparity within and across
regions in terms of teachers’ instruction and assessment practices,
which confirmed the need for a consistent assessment standard to
improve the reliability of LINC and CLIC data used to measure
students’ language learning results and report on program impact
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Implementing PBLA in ESL/FSL
Joseph Colonna
Language Training Unit, Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration
12
Redesigning the ESL/FSL Program
Goal:
To ensure the provincial Adult Non-Credit
English/French as a Second Language Training Program:
 is learner-focused and results-based;
 addresses the full spectrum of adult language training needs;
 aligns with provincial objectives for adult education; and
 is coordinated with federal language training programs.
5 OBJECTIVES:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Access to training
Program accountability and standards
Labour market language training
Coordination with the federal government
Funding and program design flexibility
Coordination with Federal Language Training
A number of enhancements will help to improve coordination between provincial and
federal language training programs. These include:
Alignment
of all language training courses to the Canadian Language Benchmarks
framework
Introduction
Adoption
Piloting
of the Coordinated Language Assessment and Referral System (CLARS)
of a shared common learner and course database (called HARTs)
Portfolio Based Language Assessment as a potential model for standardizing
in-class learner assessment and recording progress
Piloting of Portfolio-Based Language Assessment
•
•
Piloting in the Ottawa region (Ottawa Catholic School Board and Ottawa
Carleton District School Board).
Initial indications include:
– increased retention of learners in courses as well as great interest in developing
their portfolios of samples confirming their progress
– increased consistency in measuring progress
•
Currently considering the impacts of implementing PBLA more widely In
MCI’s Adult Non-Credit Language Training Program, including
–
–
–
–
managing PBLA within a large class size environment & continuous intake
cost of implementation
training of instructors
Timing to coincide / complement other major Redesign initiatives
The PBLA Model
Prepared by Joanne Pettis
EAL Specialist and former Coordinator of Adult EAL Curriculum Development for
the Government of Manitoba
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The PBLA model
An assessment approach that…
 Reflects CLB principles
 Fulfills formative and summative assessment
purposes
 Promotes and enhances learning
 Builds on and enhances teacher expertise
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Portfolio Based Language Assessment: Description
 Portfolio-Based Language is a CLBreferenced approach to assessment in
language training programs that engages
teachers and students in dialogue to tell
the story of the student’s journey in
learning English and meeting
their personal goals.
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Portfolio-Based Language Assessment
 PBLA is embedded in curriculum and is an
integral part of the teaching and learning
cycle
 Teachers and students collaborate to set
language learning goals, compile numerous
examples of language proficiency and
learning in a variety of contexts over time,
analyze the data, and reflect on progress
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Types of Portfolio
 Learning Portfolios
 Document learning over time in relationship
to goals and needs
 Presentation Portfolios
 Showcase exemplary work and skills, often for
employment purposes
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Portfolio Contents
 Student entering CLB levels, needs and goals
 Assessment tasks and skill-using activities
(Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing)
 Addressing the range of CLB outcome
competencies (e.g. in Listening & Speaking social interaction, instructions, suasion, and
information)
 Self-assessment (often using the Can Do
Checklists)
 Student reflection on learning
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Protocol: Beginning of the Term
 Set aside a regular time (usually weekly) to do
PBLA-related activities
 Intro students to new resources for PBLA
 Intro students to the concepts and develop the
language skills for PBLA
 Record entering levels, needs and goals
 Add autobiography, and samples of language
 Begin master list of portfolio tasks
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Protocol: Throughout the Term
 Assess regularly and provide action-oriented
feedback
 Add samples of language learning (minimum 4 –
5 assessment tasks per skill to make an informed
CLB decision):
 FT class – 2-3 language task samples + reflection per
week
 PT class – 3-4 language tasks sample + reflection
every 2 weeks
 Periodically review the portfolio and discuss
progress
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Protocol: At the End of the Term
 Collect portfolios
 Use master list of assigned assessment tasks
to review and evaluate portfolio data and
other documentation (e.g. anecdotal records,
SAM tasks, test results…)
 Write progress report
 Discuss progress report with students,
referencing items in the portfolio (there
should be no surprises for the student)
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Standardized Progress Report
 Page 1:
 Program & student info
 Attendance
 Current & previous CLB levels
 Page 2:
 Comments about language
learning
 Page 3:
 Additional Comments
 Suggestions
 Student Comments
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Lead Teachers (LTs)
 Support their colleagues in PBLA implementation:
 Use PBLA in their own classrooms, model promising
practice, and explore the potential of PBLA to enhance
learning
 Train colleagues in PBLA
 Support but not supervise or evaluate colleagues
 Facilitate collegial collaboration, inquiry and problemsolving around PBLA implementation
 Liaise with program administrators regarding conditions
that will best support PBLA implementation
 Must successfully complete LT training
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Student Language Companion
 A support to language learning &
settlement
 Three versions:
 ESL Literacy
 CLB Stage 1
 CLB Stage 2
 6 Sections






The Canadian Language Benchmarks
My Canada
My Community
Helpful English
My Notes
My Portfolio
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IMPLEMENTING PBLA IN THE CLASSROOM:
OTTAWA PILOT
Prepared by Larry Iveson
PBLA Lead Teacher, Adult LINC/ESL, Continuing Education,
Ottawa Carleton District School Board
28
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Role of the PBLA Lead Teacher
 Clerical/office/binder management
 PBLA Administration
 Support Students
 Provide Instructor support
 Provide instructor professional
development
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From our experiences with PBLA
 When beginning PBLA don’t feel you have to throw
everything away and start over
 The PBLA term moves really fast – take it step by step
 Students at all levels can come up with specific task
based needs and short term goal statements
 Task based outcomes allow for reinforcement of
learning
 Regular PBLA feedback on learning through rubrics,
assessments and tests allows students to focus on
their strengths and weaknesses
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IMPACT OF PBLA IMPLEMENTATION ON PROGRAMS
– OTTAWA-CARLETON DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
Shirley Graham
LINC and ESL Coordinator, Ottawa-Carleton District School Board
32
PBLA Roles and Responsibilities
 PBLA Leads
 Are vital to the success of integrating the PBLA into
your process
 Not only well-versed in CLB, but should have taught all
levels, supportive and positive by nature, processoriented with strong attention to detail
 Program Coordinators
 Coordinate program activities by refining processes
 Identify gaps in program delivery and in the community
 Harness as many efficiencies from within your
organization and offer opportunities to share
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Impact of PBLA on programs
 Managing expectations by:
 Integrating what you already are doing with the
PBLA and building upon those common
denominators
 Establishing clear lines of communication and
support regarding timelines, scheduling and
expectations
 Preparing for the introduction of progress reports
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Impact of PBLA on instructors
 Formalized approach to language delivery
and assessment that provides recalibration
to the CLB
 Establishes a common language of
understanding of benchmarks between:
 Instructor and student
 Instructors
 Service providers
35
Impact of PBLA on students
 They like the portfolio
 They like the process of communication with the
instructors and PBLA Lead
 They appreciate the explanation of their progress
and how it is captured in the portfolio
 They have a better understanding of what they do
well and what they need to do to improve
 Easier movement between service providers and
between ESL and LINC programs
36
Resistance to change
 Commonly expressed challenges:
 The process is time consuming
 The progress reports are time consuming
 Less time with students
 Too much time spent assessing, not enough
time left for teaching
The world hates change, yet it is the only thing that
has brought progress.
- Charles Kettering
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Working with resistance - Harnessing Excellence from Within
Staff have years of experience and expertise –
they have seen changes come and go!
 Identify and refer to the common denominators of what is already in
place in the program
 Identify what works and what doesn’t; who is excelling and who is
struggling
 Provide opportunities for instructors to come together to share their
own best practices
 Harness the positive engagement of your staff and support them in
developing and delivering PD on their own best practices in-house, at
local PD days, and/or regional TESL conferences
Be the change you want to see in the world
- Mahatma Gandhi
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Scheduling and Managing Expectations
 Establish clear timelines and schedule for:
 Portfolio assessment
 Student conferencing
 Completing progress reports
 Discuss challenges openly
 Find creative solutions within your program
 Progress reports are time consuming. What can be
done to ease that constraint?
 Survey your instructors on the impact this process
has had on them
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Pending issues and challenges
 Matching the language of the progress
report to the level of the student
 Providing more time for instructors to
complete the progress report
 Putting what we use on Tutela.ca
 Provide opportunities to recent grads from
TESL programs to learn about the PBLA
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PLAN FOR NATIONAL PBLA IMPLEMENTATION
Mia Gauthier, CIC
41
CIC Plan for National PBLA Implementation
 Adapt PBLA for CLIC
 Make all PBLA-related materials available online through Tutela.ca
 Allow teachers time to conduct assessments of students’ progress and to
improve assessment practices
 Equivalent of 5min/teaching hour and 8hrs of meeting time per year
 Identify and train a cadre of Lead Teachers (LTs) across Canada
 LTs would then train colleagues and guide them through the first year of PBLA
implementation, as is currently being done in Edmonton and New Brunswick
 Make the Language Companion (LC) available to all students, in hard copy
or online
 Continue to work closely with provincial & territorial partners to support
their efforts in introducing PBLA in their programs
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Questions & Answers
Thank you!
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