2014 Yr11 Info night Presentation VCE - bmo

Report
Craigieburn Secondary College
Senior School Information Night
Parents, Students & Teachers working together
The Senior School & Pathways Team
Essential VCE Information
Getting Organized – Study Timetable
VCE in
2014
WELCOME
Ms. Kate Morphy
Principal
Senior School Leadership Team
Senior School Principal: Ms. Morphy
Senior School Leader: Mr. Ormrod
Pathways Leader: Ms. Bongrain
Program Manager: Ms. Korkoneas
Yr11 Co-ordinator: Ms. Peiffer
Welfare Co-ordinator: Mr. Owen
VET Co-ordinator: Mr. Ellul
Executive Officer: Ms. Sirianni
Student Leaders
Captain: Beau Barberra
Captain: Kimberly Causevska
Vice Captain: Jessica Walters
Vice Captain: Jaqueline Corsetti
What do I need to do to get my VCE certificate?
In order to be awarded your VCE certificate you must
meet the basic requirements according to the VCE rules
which include:
Satisfactory Completion of VCE - Minimum Requirements:
• 16 VCE units in total across Yr11 & Yr12
• 3 Units of VCE English
• 3 x Unit 3 & 4 sequences (year long Yr12 Subjects) other than
English
• 90% attendance rate across all classes
A ‘VCE Unit’ takes place over one semester, there are two semesters in each school year.
How is the VCE structured?
The VCE is made up of 4 units (or semesters) worth of work across
two years:
• Units 1 & 2 are completed in Yr11
• Units 3 & 4 are completed in Yr12
How is the VCE structured?
• Units 1 & 2 (Yr11):
• Students are enrolled in 6 subjects for the year
• Unit One: in semester one students complete a unit for each
subject (6 in total)
• Unit Two: in semester two students complete a unit for each
subject (6 in total)
• Students who pass all subjects will have a total of 12 Units towards
their VCE
• Students who have completed a VET subject in Yr10 can add 2
extra Units toward their VCE (14 in total)
How is the VCE structured?
• Units 3 & 4 (Yr12):
• Students are enrolled in 5 subjects for the year
• Unit Three: in semester one students complete Unit 3 for each
subject
• Unit Four: in semester two students complete Unit 4 for each
subject
• Students who pass all subjects in Yr12 will have 10 Units to add to
their Yr11 Units
• At the end of Yr12 the student will have 22 units in total OR 24 if
they completed a VET subject in Yr10
How is the VCE structured?
Yr10
VET Business Unit 1
Semester 1
S
Yr10
VET Business Unit 2
Semester 2
S
Yr11
English Unit 1
History Unit 1
Legal Studies Unit 1
Psychology Unit 1
Literature Unit 1
VET Business Unit 3
Semester one
S
S
S
S
S
S
Yr11
English Unit 2
History Unit 2
Legal Studies Unit 2
Psychology Unit 2
Literature Unit 2
VET Business Unit 4
Semester 2
S
S
S
S
S
S
Yr12
English Unit 3
History Unit 3
Legal Studies Unit 3
Psychology Unit 3
Literature Unit 3
Study Session
Semester 1
S
S
S
S
S
Yr12
English Unit 4
History Unit 4
Legal Studies Unit 4
Psychology Unit 4
Literature Unit 4
Semester 2
S
S
S
S
S
Study Session
The student in this sample has:
• 12 Unit 1 & 2 credits (including VET 1 & 2 which were studied in Yr10)
• 12 Unit 3 & 4 credits (including VET 3 & 4 which were studied in Yr11)
• A total of 24 VCE Units
• A total of 4 English units
• A total of 5 Unit 3 & 4 sequences (year long Yr12 subjects)
• This student would receive an ATAR score based on their SAC & exam grades
How is the VCE structured?
Yr10
Semester 1
Yr10
Semester 2
Yr11
English Unit 1
History Unit 1
Legal Studies Unit 1
Psychology Unit 1
Literature Unit 1
Biology Unit 1
Semester one
N
S
S
S
S
S
Yr11
English Unit 2
History Unit 2
Legal Studies Unit 2
Psychology Unit 2
Literature Unit 2
Biology Unit 2
Semester 2
N
S
S
S
S
S
Yr12
English Unit 3
History Unit 3
Legal Studies Unit 3
Psychology Unit 3
Literature Unit 3
Study Session
Semester 1
S
S
S
S
N
Yr12
English Unit 4
History Unit 4
Legal Studies Unit 4
Psychology Unit 4
Literature Unit 4
Semester 2
S
S
N
S
S
Study Session
The student in this sample has:
• 10 Unit 1 & 2 credits
• 8 Unit 3 & 4 credits
• Although they have a total of 18 Units they would not receive their VCE because:
• They do not have at least 3 units of English
• They do not have at least 3 Unit 3 & 4 sequences other than English
• The student would not pass their VCE & would not receive an ATAR score
How do I satisfactorily complete a VCE unit?
For a student to gain a satisfactory result in any VCE unit, they must demonstrate
an understanding of each of the Outcomes set out in the subject study design by
completing both Coursework & SACs
What are Course Work tasks?
Coursework includes any work tasks set by the teacher during the unit, such as:
• bookwork
• hurdle requirements
• class activities
• Assignments
• tests
Students must complete all coursework set during the unit
School Assessed Course Work (SACs)
SACs are work tasks which are conducted under exam-like conditions and can
include:
• Essays, assignments, projects, presentations, tests, exams etc
• a graded assessment of student performance
• Student receives a score for the SAC which goes toward their ATAR score
• Students must complete all SACs set during the unit
Is there a minimum attendance rate for VCE?
VCE students must maintain a 90% attendance rate for each subject in order to
gain a satisfactory result
• A student who does not maintain this minimum
attendance requirement will be issued with an
‘Not Satisfactory’ result for that unit
• Students must have medical certificates for all
absences & must submit them to their form
teacher as soon as they return to school after an
illness
QUESTION TIME
PATHWAYS INFORMATION
Ms. Genevieve Bongrain
What will be covered:
•
•
•
•
•
About VTAC and its resources
Planning for next year
Special consideration and the Special Entry Access Scheme
Applying for Scholarships
LEAP
What is VTAC
• VTAC administers
application services for
• Tertiary courses
• SEAS (Special Entry Access
Scheme) 2013
• Scholarships 2013
• Admissions tests (STAT and
ALSET)
• VTAC also
• Calculates and issues the ATAR
(Australian Tertiary Admission
Rank) for VCE students.
• Provides information and enquiry
services including telephone,
email, blog, Facebook and
Twitter.
• Conducts information sessions.
Public and free resources
 VTAC Website: This is the definitive resource to obtaining current information on
courses, policies and procedures, applications and offers through VTAC –
www.vtac.edu.au
 VTAC Guide 2015
◦
◦
Printed book, (the school will provide copies to students)– is a synopsis of what’s on offer.
Doesn’t include detailed course information.
Online information
 ABC of Applying – printed and online.
◦
◦
Printed copies are distributed free to VCE students for their parents.
Also available for download onto your device.
 Social media
Stay up to date with timely information, provided when you need
it by subscribing to one of the following:
◦
◦
◦
VTAC Blog - http://vtacmedia.wordpress.com
Facebook - Facebook.com/vtacguide
Twitter @vtacguide
Searching for courses on VTAC
• Bring up the VTAC web page (www.vtac.edu.au)
• Use CourseSearch and then search for interested course
Online course entry
VTAC heading: This heading is created for the VTAC Guide
and CourseSearch only.
Campus, VTAC course code and fee-type: Only courses with
applications through VTAC have VTAC course codes. These codes show
which institution, campus, course and type of course fees you are
applying for.
Check the application method.
Qualification, title, length: The official title of the course and number
of years to complete the course.
Brief description about the course.
All material in this presentation is copyrighted.
Online course entry continued
Major studies: Provide a broader picture of what the
course is about. Should be used as a research tool. i.e.
Journalism
Prerequisites: Are compulsory – if a student doesn’t
meet prerequisites then won’t be considered for the
course.
Middle-band: Provides additional bonus to the ATAR – it
can assist students whose ATAR is a bit lower than the
required ATAR.
Selection mode: provides a broad overview of what is
considered as part of the selection.
Extra requirements: are compulsory requirements that
must be done, in addition to applying. Must be taken
seriously.
All material in this presentation is copyrighted.
What is SEAS
• Allows selection officers to grant special
consideration to applicants for course entry
whose education has been impacted by
disadvantage
• It is not a get out of jail free card or a
guarantee to getting into a course
SEAS Categories
 Category 1: Personal Information and Location*





Age
Recognition as an Indigenous Australian
Living or school postcode
Under represented schools
Gender
 Category 2: Non-English speaking background
 Category 3: Difficult circumstances
 Category 4: Disadvantaged financial background
 Category 5: Disability or medical condition
 Category 6: SALT (La Trobe University), PPP (Victoria University) and REEP schemes
(University of Ballarat)
* Everyone is encouraged to answer yes to Category 1. Let the system sort out if you are eligible or not!
LEAP
• The LEAP Program aims to strengthen the links
between school, university and professions.
• LEAP seeks to encourage secondary students
from low SES communities to consider higher
education as a future option.
• The focus areas are
–
–
–
–
–
Engineering,
Health,
Design,
Law and
Science
Your child's career - how you can help
• From an early age many children have ideas
about what jobs they would like to do when they
'grow up'.
• The LEAP program has been set up to help young
people learn about professions, especially ones
which require study at university.
• At home, you can talk with your child about these
things to help begin to form ideas about future
careers
Website
www.leap.vic.gov.au
Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR)
• The ATAR:
▫ Is not a score out of 100 it is a rank between 0.00
and 99.95
▫ It is not the be all and end all of a person. It is a
tool that:
▫ Allows tertiary institutions to rank students
▫ Provide a level playing field for applicants who have
all done different types of programs
All material in this presentation is copyrighted.
Calculating the ATAR
• To calculate the ATAR VTAC uses:
– English plus three other permissible scorable
studies
(primary four)
– Plus up to two other
studies
(5th and 6th increments)
Student Profiles
Student Profile 1.
Capable, high sustained effort
•
•
•
•
•
Completed all class work and home work
Attended extra classes
CHAC & Aiming High
Sought out teachers for extra work
Exam preparation – approx 8 per subject –
marked by teacher
Student Profile 2
Average achievement, high sustained
effort
• At times struggled with the concepts but
always sought teacher help
• Despite finding homework difficult she did
what she could, didn’t give up and completed
all classwork / homework
• Attended extra classes
• Exam preparation – completed practice exams
and had them marked
Student Profile 3
Capable, minimal effort
• Didn’t complete all set classwork or
homework
• Didn’t use class time effectively
• Didn’t seek to clarify areas of difficulty
• Had an outside tutor
• Little to no exam preparation
• Came to extra classes occasionally
Student Profile 4
Average, minimal effort
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Rarely completed classwork or homework
Came to school or class late
Poor organisational skills
Didn’t engage in class activities
Found excuses for not completing work
Work and socialising were a priority
Didn’t have a realistic understanding of what was
expected and required to achieve ATAR goal
Activity
• Discuss with your family which profile best
suits you
• Discuss your desired / required ATAR
Student Profile 1.
Capable, high sustained effort
• ATAR 89.6
Student Profile 2
Average achievement, high sustained
effort
• ATAR 74.2
Student Profile 3
Capable, minimal effort
• ATAR 40.8
Student Profile 4
Average, minimal effort
• ATAR 20.8
Study Timetable Activity
Things to include:
•
•
•
•
Work Commitments
Sport
Course work (3hrs per subject)
Additional Study time (3hrs per)

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