Robert Sadock, M.D. - Area 2

Report
The Main Thing
April 6, 2013
Robert T. Sadock, MD
Area 2 – M&M
The Main Thing
• The Main Thing is the Main Thing
Serve More Youth
• Membership
• Increasing Over Prior Year
Current Status
Insanity – Doing the Same Thing and Expecting a
Different Result
Membership Statistics
• NER – 18 Straight Years of Traditional
Membership Decline
• National – 13 Straight Years of Traditional
Membership Decline
• At Same Loss Rate BSA Will Have No Members
in 40 Years
New Paradigm
•
•
•
•
Diagnose the Problem
Get the Correct Specialist
Treat the Problem
Follow Up
– Make Sure the Treatment Worked
– If Not, Change Treatments
One Year Study and Analysis
National Task Force
• Charged with Making This Happen
• Current Structure is Part of the Challenge
• Current Separate Silos of Responsibility Need
to be Broken Down
• Requires Senior Management Buy-In
Structure The Problem
• Is the Problem in New or Retained
Members?
• Is the Problem in Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts
or Venturing?
• Membership = New Members +
Retained Members
• Each of These Groups Require a Different
Strategy
What is Important?
National Traditional Membership
Area
Cub Scout
Boy Scout
Venturers
Class Retained New Retained New Retained New
%
Rank
35.4% 22.7% 27.2% 6.2%
1
3
2
4
5.0%
5
Total
Total
3.5% 100%
6
Variation
• Tremendous Variation Across Councils
• New Members
• Retained Members
Variation - NER
Cub Scouts
Boy Scouts
Venturers
Retained New Retained New Retained New
High 69.1% 43.8%
95.1%
26.0%
75.2%
49.7%
Low
56.4% 26.2%
75.1%
6.1%
27.6%
21.2%
Range 12.7% 17.6%
20.0%
19.8%
47.6%
28.5%
2011 NER - Traditional
1
0.9
Retained Members
0.8
0.7
0.6
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.1
0
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
New Members
0.4
0.5
Diagnosis at Council Level
•
•
•
•
Each Council Has a Different Set of Problems
Connecticut Yankee Council, Milford, CT
Scout Executive
The Wow Factor
CYC – Retention
Total
Cub Scout
Boy Scout
CYC
71.3%
65.1%
82.6%
NER
71.1%
63.7%
88.7%
Additional
Members
CYC Revised
302
73.4%
65.1%
88.7%
Conclusion
•
•
•
•
Breakdown New vs. Retained by Catagory
Large Variations Within Each Category
Many Routes to Greater Membership
Each Council Needs Their Own Analysis
of the Problem
• National Solution vs. Local Solution
Get the Correct Specialist
• Need to Clearly Define Who is Responsible
Shared Responsibility is No Responsibility
Areas of Responsibility
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Cub Scout Recruitment
Cub Scout Retention
Cub Scout Crossover
Boy Scout Recruitment
Boy Scout Retention
Venturer Recruitment
Explorer Recruitment
Different Participants
• Professional
– Scout Executive
– District Executive
• Volunteer
– Membership Impact
– Program Impact
– Council Operations
– Commissioners
Assign Responsibility
• Job Description for Each Position
• Match the Best Group to the Position
Treat the Problem
• Business
– Fire / Hire
– Best Promoted
– Ask the Best
– Use Business Data
• Strategies
– Best Practices
– Correlations
Best Councils
• By Having a Single Equation, Can
Compare Different Councils
• Each Category Requires Different Skill
Sets and Solutions
• Can Rank Councils For Each Category
• Can Find Out Why a Council is Best in its
Category
New Cub Scouts
Council
%
Yrs>40%
640 Greater New York
48.5%
3
802 Transatlantic
44.1%
5
376 Iroquois Trail
43.8%
1
341 Jersey Shore
42.9%
1
757 Potomac
41.5%
6
225 Annawon
41.4%
1
New Cub Scout Units
• To Launch a New Cub Scout Pack….(640)
•
•
•
•
12 Month Program Planned in Advance
Trained Leaders
18 Month Financial Plans
Required to be in Uniform (Scouts & Adults)
School Recruitment Plan
Membership Committee Took Control of Sign Up
Nights
• Badge of Honor Flyers to Every School with
Dates in Advance (509)
• Extensive Use of Flyers, Yard Signs (512,538,500,341) &
Silicone Wrist Bands Promoting BeAScout.org
(512)
• School Night Chairs For Each District –(376,341)
Presentations by Trained District Volunteers
Retained Cub Scouts
Council
%
Yrs>60%
509 Bucktail
82.7%
1
244 Knox Trail
69.1%
6
388 WestchesterPutnam
69.1%
6
525 Cradle of Liberty
69.0%
3
404 Suffolk County
69.0%
6
374 Hudson Valley
68.1%
6
Keeping Units Healthy
• Council Field Staff Reporting “At Risk” Units
Consistently at Council Staff Meetings
• Targeted Units
– “Red Units”
– 90 Day Action Plan
• Council Staff Networking & Mentoring (500)
Retained Cub Scouts
Unit Committee Training
“Knowledgeable and Trained Leaders is Key to
Strong, Successful Units Which Translates
Directly into Higher Density and Better
Retention Rates” (525)
Retained Cub Scouts
Quality Unit Executive
• Assigned to Work with New or In Jeopardy
Cub Scout Units
• Paid Staff Position
• Councils Applied and Received Support for
Position
• Positions to be Sustained by Membership
Growth via Popcorn, Camping, Events (502, 525)
Retained Boy Scouts
Council
%
Yrs>90%
224 Cape Cod and Islands
104.3%
1
69 Housatonic
99.7%
2
538 Chief Cornplanter
99.4%
1
500 Moraine Trails
95.1%
1
227 Boston Minuteman
94.9%
1
404 Suffolk County
94.5%
4
Retained Boy Scouts
Training
• 100% Trained Leaders is the Expectation (By
Example Not Decree) (69)
• Roundtable Attendance > 75% of Units
– Consistently Solid RT Programs
– Gives Reason to Attend (69,504)
JTE vs. CS Retained
• Correlated - CS Advancement
p<.000000004
• Correlated - District Committee p<.004
Service Hours Rate
Commissioner Ratio
Visitation Rate
Contact Leaders Trained
JTE vs. BS Retained
•
•
•
•
•
Correlated –CS Advancement p<1E-12
Correlated –Contact Leaders Trained p<.00004
Correlated - BS Advancements p<.005
Correlated - Commissioner Ratio p<.02
Correlated – BS Camping p<.02
Service Hour Rate
 Council Leadership Train
Visitation Rate
District Committee
Other Retained Correlations
• Cost per Scout
– Rural & Suburban – No Correlation
– Urban – Less Cost per Scout the Higher the
Retention (p<.02)
• Volunteers per Scout
– Rural & Suburban – Highly Correlated (p<.00005)
– Urban – No Correlation
Trend
• Strongest Correlations Occur at the Unit Level
• Weakest at the Council Level
– CS Advancement - p<.000000004
– Contact Leaders Trained - p<.00004
– District Committee - p<.004
– District Executives
NER BS Retained – Leaders Trained
0.6
BS Retention
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.1
0
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
Leaders Trained
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
Best Practices Website
•
•
•
•
Best Practices From Around the Country
Ratings Tell Us What Others Think
A Place to Share Ideas
A Place to Post What Works
Follow Up
• Track Changes Over Time
• Are We Getting Better or Worse
• What Approaches Worked or Did Not Work
• Monitor the Specialist For Efficacy
• Promote/Train/Replace the Specialist
Insanity – Doing the Same Thing and Expecting a
Different Result
Category
High
Performance
Low
Performance
High
Improvement
Promote
Teach
Low
Improvement
Maintain
Re-Org
Northeast Area 2 Ranking
2012 Cub Scout Retention
Council#
Council Headquarters
Performance
Improvement
66
East Hartford, CT
2
3
67
Greenwich, CT
1
7
69
Derby, CT
4
10
72
Milford, CT
8
6
234
Westfield, MA
10
9
374
Newburgh, NY
9
2
386
Massapequa, NY
5
1
388
Hawthorne, NY
3
11
404
Medford, NY
7
5
405
Kingston, NY
6
8
640
New York, NY
11
4
Best Practices Portal
NER Marketing Committee
Purpose
• To take advantage of “crowd resourcing” that
the Web allows,
• To let ALL Scouters share good ideas
– Volunteers & Professionals
– Unit, District, Council, Regional, and National level
How do I get to it?
•
•
•
•
Go to https://myscouting.scouting.org/
Log in
Left hand side choices, under “Council Tools”
Choose “Best Practices Portal”
Two 5-Star Membership Ideas
From the Best Practices Portal
Using A Cub Scout Rocket Launch As A
Pack Recruiting Night Draw
Originator: seattlepioneer
01 Jul 2011
Chief Seattle Council,
Young boys often don't have much of an understanding of Cub
Scouts. However, when I take a model rocket and launcher
into a school, and ask boys if they would like to make model
rockets and see if their rocket will go the HIGHEST and the
FARTHEST --- they can relate to that!
Using A Cub Scout Rocket Launch As A
Pack Recruiting Night Draw
In exchange for contact information, families receive a Cub Scout
Rocket Pilot License and the makings for a stomp bottle
rocket. It usually takes families ~10 minutes to make a rocket
After parents observe the launch a few times and satisfy
themselves that it's well supervised, they are invited to sign
up for Cub Scouts. That's usually pretty easy---- we don't have
to TALK about how Cub Scouts is a fun family activity
Using A Cub Scout Rocket Launch As A
Pack Recruiting Night Draw
RESULT ACHIEVED:
Greater turnout for pack recruiting nights! More families signing
up for Cub Scouts!
COMMENTS
This sounds like a fantastic idea! Thank you for posting this, Will!
Ben McInnis, Cubmaster, Pack 39, Summit, RI
Report to the City
Originator: tina.brendle
12 Nov 2011
Bay Area Council,
Report to City is a modified version of Report to State with
all ages; Cubs Scouts, Boy Scouts, Venture Crews and
Teams delivering a brief report, to presiding dignitaries,
on their contributions to the community in the past year.
Report to the City
Scouts were nominated as MC, Color Guard and Pledge of
Allegiance, Scout Oath and Dignitary Escort
There were afternoon sessions for rank advancement, belt
loops and merit badges. City depts. such as Park and Rec,
Fire, Police, EMS, hosted 17 activities: Citizen in the
Community, Fire Safety, & First Aid Merit Badges; and
Swimming, Recycle, and Fishing Belt Loops to name some.
To close the day, Scouts partnered with the VFW Post to
conduct a flag retirement ceremony.
Report to the City
RESULT ACHIEVED:
This event exposed Scouts to government, public speaking and
the importance of contributing to the local community.
COMMENTS:
A fantastic idea. Community leaders learn about Scouting
accomplishments & the Scouts get to self promote & learn
communication. A great growth exercise for future leaders.
I enjoyed this idea for its combination of civic duty for the Scouts
with positive PR among community members
New BPP offshoot – “Scout Link”
• Wikipedia like option: A different page where
we invite all users to build a Best Practice on
topics of our choosing. Needs small amount
of computer programming to launch.

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