Call to Action – Sustaining FCS ED-Healthy Weight

Report
Call to Action:
Healthy Lifestyle: Obesity
Prevention
Janet F. Laster, Ph.D.
Sandra Laurenson, M.S.
OAFCS Public Policy Co-Chairs
Ohio’s Call to Action:
In 2009 and Now
•
School districts, facing
inadequate school
funding, reduce or
eliminate FCS programs
.
• Poor dietary habits, lack of
food preparation skills,
inactive life styles, and
“obesgenic” environment
cause obesity and related
chronic diseases—all
driving up personal,
healthcare, and national
debt
• Dr. Lichtenstein: “Bring
back Home Economics”
(JAMA editorial)
• Public’s lack of FCS
name recognition and farreaching effects
2011 AAFCS Resolutions
• Sustaining Family and Consumer
Sciences Education
• Obesity Prevention & Healthy Weight
Initiative
www.aafcs.org Advocacy  Resolutions
Sustaining FCS Education:
Be it Resolved that
AAFCS, Affiliates, Communities...
• Promote name recognition of “Family and Consumer
Sciences” and understanding of scope of FCS and its
relevance to serious societal concerns today such as
obesity, food safety, financial literacy.
• Support and facilitate development and implementation of
national, state, and local intervention strategies to sustain
FCS Education in current economic and education
environment.
Obesity Prevention-Healthy Weight
Initiative: Be It Resolved that
AAFCS, Affiliates, Communities, Members...
• Advocate collaborating with nutrition science, medicine,
education, policy makers to garner support for FCS
Education in MS, HS, Extension programs
• Partner with others to advocate comprehensive national
obesity prevention and nutrition education
• Utilize opportunities within range of influence and practice to
promote national obesity prevention and nutrition education
in public schools and communities
• “Take Obesity Prevention to Streets!”
Healthy Lifestyle - Obesity Prevention:
National CALLS for Action
•
2010 First Lady Michelle Obama’s
•
Dr. Lichtenstein’s “Bring back Home Economics
Education” in JAMA, May 12, 2010
•
Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010
•
Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (PL 111-296)
signed into law
•
Institute of Medicine Report, May 8, 2012
•
Bipartisan Policy Center Report, June 6, 2012
Sustaining FCS Education +
Obesity Prevention-Healthy
Lifestyles = Synergy
Ohio’s Action Plan Goals:
•
•
•
•
Align FCS curriculum, strategies & public image:
Professional Development workshops, conferences.
Become active advocates for public policy supporting
healthy lifestyles, FCS ED.
Initiate/Participate in community healthy lifestyle initiatives.
Use FCS branding resources.
What has been done?
In Ohio?
•
FCS Education Promotion Task Force
•
OAFCS Annual Conference: Resolution Support - Keynote:
Dr. Cheryl Achterberg, Advisory Committee
Member
for DGFA201
•
Obesity Prevention Projects: Extension, United Way,
Action for Healthy Kids, Dairy Council
•
Professional Development Workshop: Status of FCS
Education in Ohio - Obesity Research, Trends &
Developments, e.g.,Dietary Guidelines for Americans
•
2010 - Public Policy Panel:
State Rep & School Board member
What has been done?
•
Developed/adapted resources (with FCS branding):
•
Affiliate Action Plan Framework
•
Sample letter for State legislators, school board
•
Call to Action Briefs & Resources
•
Call to Action: FCS Professionals
•
Call to Action: Americans
•
FCS Education Brief (with branding)
•
A Call to Action—Private and Public Policy
Recommendations for Obesity Prevention
•
Leadership Action Plan Framework
•
4 PowerPoint Slides (with FCS branding)
What has been done?
•
Developed/adapted resources:
•
4PowerPoint Slides (with FCS branding)
•
FCS Branding slides (4 slides)
•
Obesity Crisis Slides
•
Call to Healthy Lifestyle: Obesity Prevention
•
Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010:
Quiz Yourself! (145 slides with FCS branding)
Portion Control slides (with FCS branding)
Adapted from Alice Henneman, MS, RD, U Nebraska- Food.unl.edu
www.aafcs.org  Advocacy  Resolutions
Key Message: Policy Makers
Please, ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (formerly
home economics) Education programs are in every middle and
high school and community in our state.
REASONS:
1. To develop the essential life skills needed to address this
complex obesity-related crisis: nutrition, food selection and
preparation, parenting, personal and family finance, and career
planning skills.
Key Message:
Reasons to support FCS ED
2. Only Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) educators
have the expertise and credentials * to “provide
comprehensive health (and) nutrition…education programs
in educational settings, (with) special emphasis on food
preparation skills, food safety, and lifelong physical activity”
and * to “encourage healthy weight gain during pregnancy
and breastfeeding” as part of this “comprehensive health
(and) nutrition…education program”
recommended in USDA and HHS’s Dietary Guidelines for
Americans 2010 and Institute of Medicine’s Accelerating
Progress in Obesity Prevention Report
Key Message:
Reasons to support FCS ED
3. Providing a mandatory food preparation curriculum to
students throughout the country may be among the best
investments society could make [to reduce health care
expenditures]”.
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein of Tufts University, co-author of “Bring Back Home
Economics Education” article in the Journal of the American Medical
Association, at the
Youth Obesity Prevention Summit sponsored by the FCS Alliance member:
Board on Human Sciences
See “Point of View Obesity Prevention Summit: Positive Change Seen”
Carolyn W. Jackson, AAFCSExecutive Director, Winter 2012 Journal of FCS
Key Message:
Reasons to support FCS ED
4. Contemporary family members do not know how to
cook or understand ingredients of foods, their nutrients,
and their effects on the health of their bodies.
5. FCS educators help their students with other critical
and essential skills needed to successfully live and
work in our complex and constantly changing world:
career planning skills, such as understanding the
impact of obesity and health on employment, lifetime
earnings, and productivity.
Next Steps:
• Update: Use resources
* Obesity causes, consequences
* Nutrition research
* Public policy recommendations
• Take Responsibility, Leadership Action:
- As individual, family leader
- In workplace, profession
- In community
My Responsibility-Leadership Action
Plan to help make America Healthy
Individual/Family Action
Community-Related Action
• Monitoring my calories:
www.myfitnesspal.com
• Eat healthy foods, including
2 ½ cup veggies/day,
less than 20 g sugar/day
• Walk 60-70 min./day
• Special fruits, berries as
treats for grandchildren
rather than cookies, cake
• Encouraging husband to
make whole grain bread
rather than cookies, cakes
• Proposed/organizing
Healthy Lifestyle Advisory
Committee at church
• Proposed/organizing
Forums at church:
1) Obesity Crisis
2) What should we do to
prevent obesity of our
children? Ourselves?
Goals to Accelerate Obesity
Prevention
1. Integrate physical activity every day in every way.
2. Market what matters for a healthy life.
3. Make healthy foods and beverages available
everywhere.
4. Activate employers and health care professionals.
5. Strengthen schools as the
of health.
… accomplishing any one of these might help speed up progress in
preventing obesity, but together, their effects will be reinforced,
amplified, and maximized.
Institute of Medicine
Everyone has a role in the movement to
make America healthy.”
Dietary Guidelines for American, 2010
“Success is only possible if all…work
together and bring creativity, innovation and
focused commitment to the effort.”
Lots to Lose. Bipartisan Policy Center
Features & Benefits of
Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS)
Family and Consumer
Sciences (FCS)
Areas of Study*
 Nutrition and Wellness
 Food Preparation and Safety
 Consumer and Family Resources, including Financial
Literacy
 Parenting
 Reasoning for Action
 Career, Community and Family Connections
 Family
 Human Development
 Interpersonal Relationships
*National Standards for FCS
nasafacs.org/national-standards--competencies.html
Healthy People 2010 Targets
Adults (20 and older):



Healthy weight: 60%
Overweight:
Obese: only 15%
Did we reach 2010 Targets?
National Center for Health Statistics. National Health
Trends
Adults (20 and older):
• Healthy weight: Falling
From 52% (1971) to 30% (2008)
• Overweight: Stable
From 32% (1971) to 33% (2008)
• Obese: Rising
From 14% (1971) to 34% (2008)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics. National Health
Dramatic Increase of Obesity* Among U.S. Adults
BRFSS, 1990, 2000, 2010
(*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs. overweight for 5’4” person)
2000
1990
2010
No Data
<10%
10%–14%
15%–19%
20%–24%
25%–29%
≥30%
U.S. Obesity* Trends:
Dramatic Increase in 20 Years
*Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater.
• In 2010 thirty-three states had a prevalence equal to or greater than 25%;
12 of these states had a prevalence of obesity equal to or greater than 30%.
• Ohio’s obesity rate is currently 29.8%.
http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/trends.html
2010
No Data
<10%
10%–14%
15%–19%
20%–24%
25%–29%
≥30%
Over last 30 years, rates of obesity
(BMI >30) in US more than doubled for
adults and more than tripled for children
Definitions: Weight Groups
Adult (BMI*):
Underweight: BMI less than 18.5 kg/m2
Healthy weight: BMI between 18.5 - 24.9 kg/m2
Overweight:
BMI between 25.0 - 29.9 kg/m2
Obese: BMI equal to or greater than 30.0 kg/m2
BMI (Body Mass Index) measurement:
Divide weight (in kilograms) by height (in meters)
squared: kg/m2
Source: Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010
Definitions: Weight Groups
Children and Adolescents
(BMI for Age Percentile Range):
Unhealthy weight:
Less than 5th percentile
Healthy weight: 5th to less than 85th percentile
Overweight: 85th to less than 95th percentile
Obese: Equal to or greater than 95th percentile
Source: Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010
Epidemic of overweight and obesity
64% of women
72% of men
Childhood obesity also rising
Sources: National Center for Health Statistics (June 2010)
Trends
Childhood obesity also rising
•
•
•
•
Childhood obesity has more than tripled in last 30 years in
US
More than 1/3 of children (ages 2-19) are overweight or
obese
Obese children aged 6-11: 7% in 1980
to 20% in 2008
Adolescents aged 12-19: 5% in 1980
to 18% in 2008
What is the percentage today?
2011 Centers for Disease Control
Resources
USDA & USDHHS, Dietary Guidelines for American
2010 www.dietaryguidelines.gov
See p.59 for Resource List
Local data related to obesity:
http://www.countyhealthcalculator.org/widget
State specific data on health care costs and quality,
prevention, insurance coverage, public health,
childhood obesity, examples of community creativity,
and possible funding source:
http://www.rwjf.org/childhood obesity/
http://www.rwjf.org/healthpolicy/
Trends
Health risks rising with childhood obesity
•
•
Risk of adult obesity increases:
o 25% chance as preschooler
o 40% at age 7
o 75% at age 12
o 90% as teenager
Risk factors for adult chronic diseases
increasingly found in younger ages
2011 Centers for Disease Control
Trends
Long-term health effects:
Obese children likely be obese adults with risk for:
•
•
•
•
Many types of cancer, including breast, colon,
endometrium, esophagus, kidney, pancreas, gall bladder,
thyroid, ovary, cervix, prostate, multiple myeloma and
Hodgkin's lymphoma
Type-2 diabetes (with likely more complications earlier
than adults)
Heart disease & stroke
Osteoarthritis
2011 Centers for Disease Control
Trends
•
•
•
•
Immediate health effects of
childhood obesity:
Cardiovascular disease, such as high
cholesterol or high blood pressure
Prediabetes (more difficult to treat than for adults)
Bone and joint problems
Social & psychological problems, such as
stigmatization and poor self-esteem
2011 Centers for Disease Control
Trends
Overweight, obesity, and cancer
BAD NEWS:
Obesity & being overweight increases risk of death
from many cancers:
14% of cancer deaths in men
20% of cancer deaths in women
GOOD NEWS:
Prevention of overweight & obesity reduces risk for
several types of cancer
2011 Centers for Disease Control
Trends
Reduced personal income
• Workers who are obese are less likely to be
promoted than fit peers.
• Obese women earn about 11% less salary
than women of healthy weight or $76 less
per week in 2010.
Health economist John Cawley, Cornell University, and Reuters
Trends
Rising business costs
Obesity related absenteeism costs
employers as much as $6.4 billion a year.
Health economists led by Eric Finklelstein,
Duke University
Trends
Rising healthcare costs
According to CDC, obesity costs U.S.
 as much as $147 - $190 billion annually.
 or one-fifth of all health care spending in the
U.S.
 At current rates of increase, obesity costs
expected to exceed $300 billion by 2018.
Trend
Rising healthcare costs and national debt
Obesity Crisis:
Private and Public Policy Issue
Family/Public health crisis &National economic
crisis:
- Affects all segments of society:
Adults, children; rich, poor
- Long-term budget issue
- Bipartisan issue
Source: Bipartisan Policy Center
What’s causing this increased
weight gain?
From 1970s until 2008, changing food supply
• Increased availability of all food categories
• Eating out, particularly at fast food restaurants, rather than
cooking at home
• Average daily calories available per person in marketplace
increased approximately 600 calories
• Greatest caloric increases in availability of added fats and
oils, grains, milk and milk products, and caloric sweeteners
• Increased portion sizes offered for sale Obesogenic
environment
Source: Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010
Obesogenic Environment
Promotes over
consumption of
calories, sodium,
sugar, solid and
trans fatty acids
Obesogenic Environment
Discourages
physical
activity and
calorie
expenditure
What has been done?
What needs to be done?
Increase Breastfeeding
...if 90 percent of new mothers in the
United States breastfed exclusively for
six months, this change alone could
deliver health care cost savings on the
order of $13 billion annually.
Source: Business Case for Breastfeeding. HHS.
What needs to be done?
Health Consequences of Obesity
What needs to be done?
...if 90 percent of
new mothers in the
United States
breastfed exclusively
for
six months, this
change alone could
deliver health care
cost savings on the
order of $13 billion
annually.
Source: Business Case for
Breastfeeding. HHS.
Recognizing the obesity crisis in the
U.S., First Lady Michelle Obama
launched her Let’s Move! obesity
initiative in February 2010.
TIS Leadership Team 2010-11
“Taking it to the Streets”
2010-2011 Initiative: Preventing Obesity
Private and Public Policy Issue
Obesity, rising healthcare costs
and national debt
How can businesses, communities and
individuals come together to turn the tide
and restore America's intertwined
physical and fiscal health?
Bipartisan Policy Center
What has been done?
In state? Locally?
What has been done?
Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010
(PL 111-296)
• Authorizes funding and sets policy for USDA’s core
programs: National School Lunch, School Breakfast,
WIC, Summer Food Service, Child and Adult Care
Food Programs
• Allows opportunity, for first time in 30 years, for real
reforms to school lunch and breakfast programs by
improving safety net for millions of children
USDA.gov
What has been done?
Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010
• Based on most recent scientific evidence
summarized in Report of the Dietary Guidelines
Advisory Committee on the Dietary Guidelines for
Americans, 2010 at http://www.dietaryguidelines.gov
•
For health promotion and disease prevention for
Americans 2 years old and older
•
Form basis for nutrition policy in Federal food,
education, and information programs
Grading the Strength
of the Evidence
• Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC)
grading criteria:
Quality of studies
Quantity of studies and subjects
Consistency of findings across studies
Magnitude of the effect or public health impact
Generalizability to the population of interest
• Qualitative words used to describe the strength
of the evidence:
Strong, Moderate, Limited, Expert Opinion,
and Grade Not Assignable (See p. 6, DGFA2010)
ion
USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion
Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010
•
Maintain calorie balance over time to achieve
and sustain a healthy weight
- Improve eating pattern and physical activity behaviors
- Control total calorie intake: Reduce sodium, sugar, solid fats
•
Focus on consuming nutrient-dense foods and
beverages
- Increase intake of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fat-free
or low-fat milk and milk products, seafood, and oils with
no SoFAS (Solid Fats Added Sugars)
Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010
Healthy eating plan:
• Emphasizes nutrient-dense foods:
vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and fatfree or low-fat milk and milk products
• Includes lean meats, poultry, fish, beans,
peas, eggs, unsalted nuts and seeds
• Is low in saturated fats, trans fats,
cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added
sugars
• Stays within your daily calorie needs
For more information on healthy weight, see
www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/index.html
Key Terms
• Calorie balance: Balance between calories
consumed in foods & beverages and calories
expended through physical activity and metabolic
processes
• Eating pattern: Combination of foods & beverages
that constitute an individual's complete dietary intake
over time
• Nutrient-dense: Foods providing vitamins, minerals,
and other beneficial substances, such as fiber &
phytochemicals, with relatively few calories
Nutrient-dense Foods & Beverages
• Whole plant foods: Vegetables (dark-green, red,
and orange), fruits, whole grains, beans and peas,
unsalted nuts and seeds
• Seafood
• Eggs
• Fat-free & low-fat milk & milk products
• Lean meat & poultry
• These foods prepared without adding
solid fats or sugars or refined starches
Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010, p. 5
Key Recommendations
1. Balance calories with physical activity to
manage weight
• Prevent and/or reduce overweight and obesity through
improved healthy eating & physical activity.
• Control total calorie intake to manage body weight.
• For overweight or obese, consume fewer calories
from high caloric food and beverages.
• Increase physical activity and reduce time in
sedentary activities.
• Maintain appropriate calorie balance during each
stage of life.
Key Recommendations
Prevent and/or reduce overweight and obesity through improved
healthy eating and physical activity behaviors:
•
Increase physical activity and reduce time spent in sedentary
behaviors.
•
Maintain appropriate calorie balance during each stage of life—
childhood, adolescence, adulthood, pregnancy and breastfeeding,
and older age.
•
Be aware of calories consumed and needed for age, gender, height,
weight, and activity level.
•
Determine one’s daily calorie needs by monitoring body weight and
adjust calorie intake and participation in physical activity based on
changes in weight over time.
Key Recommendations
Prevent and/or reduce overweight and obesity through improved
healthy eating and physical activity behaviors:
• Eat nutrient-dense breakfast.
• Replace high calorie foods with nutrient-dense foods:
whole grains, vegetables, fruits, non-fat and low-milk and
milk products, lean meats and poultry.
• Choose smaller portions of foods, beverages.
• Monitor intake of 100% fruit juice for children &
adolescents.
• Monitor calories from alcoholic beverages.
Key Recommendations
Prevent and/or reduce overweight and obesity through improved
healthy eating and physical activity behaviors:
• Make food choices, at home and away from home: nutrient
dense, low in calories, and appropriate portion size
• Focus on the total number of calories consumed.
• Monitor and control total caloric intake: Consume fewer
calories by replacing foods higher in calories with nutrientdense foods and beverages relatively low in calories:
• Increase intake of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains
•
Reduce intake of sugar-sweetened beverages
Simplified Calorie Counting
Average Calories per Serving
• Vegetables – 25 calories: 1 cup raw; ½ cup cooked
• Fruits – 60 calories: medium size fresh fruit; ½ c. sliced fruit
• Grains & Starchy Vegetables – 70 calories: ½ cup or slice of
bread
• Lean Protein/Low-Fat Dairy Products – 110 calories: 3 oz. or
1 cup low fat dairy or 1 oz. cheese
• Fats – 45 calories: 1 teaspoon oil; 1 tablespoon nuts, seeds
• Sugars – 20 calories: 1 sugar cube; 1 teaspoon sugar
Mayo Clinic Diet, 2010
Key Recommendations
2. Reduce some foods and food components:
•
Daily sodium to less than 2,300 mg; or 1,500 mg if 51 or over, AfricanAmerican or have hypertension, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease
•
Saturated fatty acids to less than 10% of calories: Replace with
monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids
•
Trans fatty acids, such as partially hydrogenated oils
•
Solid fats and added sugars (SoFAS)
•
Foods that contain refined grains, especially foods with solid fats,
added sugars, and sodium
•
Dietary cholesterol (less than 300 mg per day)
•
Alcohol, in moderation: 1 drink for women; 2 drinks for men per day
•
Key Recommendations
3. Increase these foods and nutrients (Ch. 4):
•
Vegetables and fruits
•
Variety of vegetables, especially dark-green, red, and orange
vegetables, beans, and peas
•
Whole grains: Replace refined grains with whole
least half
•
Fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products, such as yogurt, cheese,
or fortified soy beverages
•
Variety of protein foods: seafood (8-oz. per week), lean meat and
poultry, eggs, beans and peas, soy products, and unsalted nuts
and seeds
•
Potassium, dietary fiber, calcium and vitamin D
grains—at
Key Recommendations
4. Build healthy eating pattern to meet nutrient needs
over time at appropriate calorie level, e.g., DASH,
Mediterranean-style
• Focus on nutrient-dense foods
• Remember: Beverages count
• Nutrients should come from food
• Only use dietary supplements or fortification in
specific situations to provide highly bioavailable
forms, e.g. vitamin D, Folic acid, vitamin B12, iron for
pregnant women
New Dietary Emphasis
Focus on consuming nutrient-dense foods
• Increase vegetable and fruit intake
• Increase whole-grain intake by replacing refined grains
with whole grains
• Choose a variety of protein foods, including plant-based
proteins, i.e., beans, peas, soy, unsalted nuts and seeds,
and animal-based protein, i.e. seafood, lean meat and
poultry, eggs
• Without calories from added sugar and solid fats
Top Sources of Calories
Among Americans 2 Years and Older
Grain-based desserts
Cake, cookies, pie, cobbler, sweet rolls, pastries, and donuts
Yeast breads
White bread and rolls, mixed-grain bread, flavored bread, whole
wheat bread, and bagels
Chicken and chicken mixed dishes
Fried and baked chicken parts, chicken strips/patties, stir-fries,
casseroles, sandwiches, salads, and other chicken mixed dishes
Soda/energy/sports drinks
Sodas, energy drinks, sports drinks, and sweetened bottled water
including vitamin water
Pizza
Source: NHANES 2005-2006,
Available at riskfactor.cancer.gov/diet/foodsources/
Call to Action: Public Policy
Become active advocate for policies
supporting healthy lifestyles
Guiding Principles (DGFA2010, Ch. 6, pp. 57-58 for Strategies)
1. Ensure all Americans have access to nutritious foods
& opportunities for physical activity
2. Facilitate individual behavior change through
environmental strategies
3. Set the stage for lifelong healthy eating, physical
activity, & weight management behaviors
Institute of Medicine’s
Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention
Goals
1. Integrate physical activity every day in every way
2. Make healthy foods and beverages available
everywhere
3. Market what matters for a healthy life: Physical activity,
food, nutrition
4. Activate employers and health care professionals
5. Strengthen schools as the heart of health
Recommendations and strategies for action available at
www.iom.edu/~/media/Files/Report%20Files/2012/APOP/APOP_insert.pdf
Institute of Medicine’s
Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention
IOM Goals and Recommendations
1. Integrate physical activity every day in every way:
Recommendation 1: Communities, transportation officials, community planners,
health professionals, and governments should make promotion of physical
activity a priority by substantially increasing access to places and opportunities
for such activity.
2. Make healthy foods, beverages available everywhere:
Recommendation 2: Governments and decision makers in the business
community/private sector should make a concerted effort to reduce unhealthy
food and beverage options and substantially increase healthier food and
beverage options at affordable, competitive prices.
Institute of Medicine’s
Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention
Unhealthy foods and beverages*
•
•
•
•
Calorie-dense and low in naturally occurring nutrients
Contribute little fiber
Contribute few essential nutrients and phytochemicals
Contain added fats, sweeteners, sodium, and other
ingredients
• Displace the consumption of foods recommended in the
Dietary Guidelines for Americans and
• May lead to the development of obesity.
* No consensus of definition
Institute of Medicine’s
Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention
IOM Recommendations – cont’d
3. Market what matters for a healthy life
Recommendation 3: Industry, educators, and governments should act
quickly, aggressively, and in a sustained manner on many levels to
transform the environment that surrounds Americans with messages
about physical activity, food, and nutrition.
4. Activate employers and health care professionals
Recommendation 4: Health care and health service providers,
employers, and insurers should increase the support structure for
achieving better population health and obesity prevention.
Institute of Medicine’s
Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention
IOM Recommendations – cont’d
5. Strengthen schools as the heart of health
Recommendation 5: Federal, state, and local government and
education authorities, with support from parents, teachers, and the
business community and the private sector, should make schools a
focal point for obesity prevention.
Strategy 5-3: Ensure food literacy, including skill development, in
schools. Through leadership and guidance from federal and state
governments, state and local education agencies should ensure the
implementation and monitoring of sequential food literacy and nutrition
science education, spanning grades K-12, based on the food and
nutrition recommendations in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
Bipartisan Policy Center’s Lots to Lose
Nutrition and Physical Activity Initiative
All assume leadership and responsibility
for change and action:
• Healthy families: Develop federal dietary guidelines for all children
under six, all nutrition assistance programs reflect dietary guidelines,
promote breastfeeding
• Healthy schools: Improve nutrition & physical activity
• Healthy workplaces: Develop workplace wellness programs
• Healthy communities: Central role in lifestyle choices
1. Community-based, prevention-focused Health Care
2. Large institutions: Serve healthier foods & lead by example
3. Community programs and built environment:
Families and local governments expand physical
activity opportunities and promote active living
What Should We Do?
How should we answer the call for “All to
assume leadership and responsibility for
change and action to prevent obesity”?
•
•
•
•
What should we do individually?
As parents? Grandparents?
What should we do professionally?
What should we do as community members?
Promote Health & Healthy Eating
Health for every age, body shape, and size
Health-centered NOT Weight-centered
•
Healthy eating in response to internal body cues: Hunger
•
Pleasurable physical activity
•
Appreciation of natural diversity in body shape and size and
factors contributing to weight
•
Relaxed eating
•
Critical contribution of social, emotional, spiritual & physical factors
to health and happiness
•
Dieting ineffectiveness & dangers
Call to Action
Think – Pair – Share
• What have you learned that you want to share
with others?
• Use yourself?
• What surprised you?
• What reinforced what you already knew?
What questions do you have?
Issues
All families having access to healthy food
•
Nearly 15% of Am households unable to acquire adequate food
to meet nutritional needs (Dietary Guidelines for
Americans,2010, p. 2)
•
Sociologist Helen Lee reported in the journal Social Science &
Medicine that children in poor, minority neighborhoods have
ample access to fast food & convenience stores but also
supermarkets
• Distance to food outlets didn't explain weight gain
• Similar findings by health economist Roland Strum at the Rand
Corp for children in CA & national studies of middleschoolers
Call to Action:
Refining FCS Curriculum
Align curriculum, strategies & public image
1.
Create and promote healthy lifestyles for children (from in utero to
18 years) Appropriate weight gain during pregnancy,
breastfeeding for infant and mother to have healthy weight
throughout lifetime (NGFA2010, p. 58; Lots to Lose, pp. )
2.
Set the stage for lifelong healthy eating, physical activity & weight
management behaviors: Provide comprehensive health, nutrition,
& physical educational programs in educational settings with
special emphasis on food preparation skills, food safety, and
lifelong physical activity (DGFA2010, Ch. 6, p. 58
Call to Action: FCS Teaching
Refine teaching strategies for developing
healthy eating & safe food preparation skills
1. Evaluate objectives, eating patterns advocated by
example, recipes, and teaching time spent on
preparing vegetables, fruit, and whole grains vs
refined grain-based desserts and breads
2. Sequence & structure food preparation labs to enjoy
preparing food, eating together, developing knifing
skills; vegetable, fruit, whole grain, fish, and lean
meat and poultry preparation skills; food safety skills
Ruth Dohner, OAFCS, 2012
Call to Action: Evaluate
Collect data to evaluate FCS program
effectiveness
1. Pre-Post unit/course tests
2. Healthy lifestyle project: Pre-post personal
assessment of diet, physical activity, and BMI using
eating, sleeping, & activity logs per day.
Use Super Tracker:
http://www.choosemyplate.gov/SuperTracker/
Or http://www.myfitnesspal.com
Also Dairy Council ppts at www.eatsmart.org
Call to Action: “Take it to the Streets!”
Participate in community healthy lifestyle
initiatives
1. Partner with community agencies, organizations to
promote or support healthy lifestyle, e.g., Action for
Healthy Kids, United Way, schools, Extension
2. Partner with others to develop personal healthy lifestyle,
e.g., teachers, Extension, colleagues, family or friends
3. Advocate supporting FCS Education in MS, HS, and
community extension programs
“Providing a mandatory food preparation
curriculum to students throughout the country
may be among the best investments society
could make [to reduce health care
expenditures]”.
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein of Tufts University, co-author of “Bring Back Home Economics
Education” article in the Journal of the American Medical Association, at the Youth Obesity
Prevention Summit sponsored by the FCS Alliance member: Board on Human Sciences
See “Point of View Obesity Prevention Summit: Positive Change Seen” Carolyn W. Jackson, AAFCS Executive
DirectorWinter 2012 Journal of FCS
The “Taking It to the Streets”
Leadership Team
Provides
– State and partner liaisons
– Ongoing communication
– Conference Presentations
– Resources available at website link:
http://www.aafcs.org/Advocacy/TIS.asp
TIS Leadership Team 2010-11
Obesity and the Impact on
Everyday Livings
Finances
Clothing
Shelter
Family Relationships
Social Relationships
Emotions …..and more!
Join the new community formed around Obesity
Prevention!
AAFCS Taking it to the Streets Formed
Partnerships with
Groups such as the Public Policy Committee,
AAFCS Communities, Extension, FCCLA, 4-H, ACTE,
Phi Upsilon Omicron & Kappa Omicron Nu
TIS Leadership Team 2010-11
An exciting campaign sponsored by AAFCS
to respond
to critical
utilizing
family
TAKING
IT issues
TO THE
STREETS
and consumer sciences research and
expertise.
We are….
Touching lives……
Through YOU!
TIS Leadership Team 2010-11
Resources at
www.aafcs.org/Advocacy/TIS.asp
• Includes Impact of Obesity on Life, with
websites, related research, key findings,
implications for FCS, and suggested learning
activities
• The research-based Childhood Obesity
Causation Wheel developed and shared by Dr.
Janelle Walter and Dr. Bernadette Hascheke
• Updated by the Taking It to the Streets Team
CHILDHOOD OBESITY CAUSATION WHEEL
In 2007 20% of children ages 6-11 and 18% of adolescents 12-19 were overweight (CDC).
ISSUES RELATED TO CHILDHOOD OBESITY:
•
•
•
•
Social isolation and poor self-esteem
Risk factors for heart disease, high cholesterol, high blood pressure
Excessive weight and obesity linked closely to type 2 diabetes in children
Overweight adolescents have a 70% chance of becoming overweight or
obese adults
LIMITED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY:
• Excessive use of TV, electronic games,
texting, computer work
• Unhealthy snacks chosen while engaged
in above activities
• Minimal outdoor play
ALTERNATE MEAL CHOICES:
• These meal choices include:
fast food, take-out, prepackaged/
convenience foods which:
 are higher in fat, calories, and
sugar content
 are lower in fiber
 contain fewer fruits & vegetables
 include more carbonated beverages
 may have increased portion sizes
FAMILY MEALTIME ISSUES:
•More meals eaten away from home
• More time constraints
• More time may be spent on extra
curricular activities
• Less energy to prepare meals
• Limited food preparation skills &
nutrition knowledge
NEIGHBORHOOD ISSUES:
• No adult supervision of activities
outside the home
• Restricted outdoor playtime due
to neighborhood safety issues
SCHOOL ISSUES:
• Starting in middle school,
fewer children participate in
school lunch programs
• A la carte choices contain
higher fat content and fewer
fruits & vegetables
INADEQUATE SUPERVISION:
• Fewer structured activities
• Less physical activity=
more couch potatoes
• Increased access to foods with
low nutrient quality
Causation Wheel © developed and revised 2011 by
Dr. Janelle Walter & Dr. Bernadette Hascheke
AAFCS Resources
Thank You!

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