Huntington`s disease

Report
Huntington's disease
What is Huntington's disease?
Huntington’s disease is an inherited brain disorder that results in
the loss of both mental and physical control.
Between the ages of 30 to 50 symptoms will occur. They will
worsen over a 10 to 25 year period. When someone has HD they
will die, but from pneumonia, heart failure or another
complications .Everyone has the HD gene but it is those
individuals that inherit the expansion of the gene
who will develop HD and may then maybe pass it onto children.
There is no cure for this disease.
Patient with Huntington’s disease
Lisa Marie, a 45 year old women, said that she was
having a hard time balancing; she also added that she
was stumbling and falling and seemed to be very clumsy
lately. She adds that she has lost all coordination and has
slurred many of her words. Her family members have
noticed she's had poor judgment and difficulty
remembering important events as well as concentrating
and answering questions.
Symptoms
Physical symptoms of Huntington's disease would include:
Development of tics (involuntary movement) in the fingers, feet, and face.
Loss of coordination and balance
Slurred speech
Jaw clenching or teeth grinding, as well as difficulty swallowing or eating
Continual muscular contractions
Stumbling or falling
Increased clumsiness
Emotional symptoms:
Hostility and irritability
Ongoing disinterest in life (lack of pleasure or joy)
Bipolar disorder (manic-depression) in some Huntington's patients
Lack of energy
Mental symptoms would include:
Decreased concentration, forgetfulness and memory decline.
Poor judgment
Difficulty making decisions or answering questions and difficulty driving.
Regions of the Brain
Effected by
Huntington's
The part of the brain most affected
by HD is a group of nerve cells at
Disease
the base of the brain known
collectively as the basal ganglia.
Movements of the body are
organized at the basal ganglia. It is
so heavily effected because nerve
cells of the striatum are the first to
die as HD progresses.
Diagnosis-tests done
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A neurologist will interview the individual intensively to obtain the
medical history and rule out other conditions. By running small tests
involving motor symptoms like reflexes, muscle strength, coordination and
Balance as well as sensory symptoms.
a psychiatrist may be needed for an examination to judge a number of
factors that could contribute to the diagnosis, which would include
emotional state, patterns of behaviors, quality of judgment, etc.
Genetic testing is used to confirm the diagnosis.
If someone has family history a predictive genetic test can be run even if
the person but shows no signs or symptoms.
Treatment
There is no cure for Huntington's disease but
medications can relieve some symptoms. The
Research for this disease has yet to find a means of
slowing the deadly progression of HD. Medications
including:
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Tetrabenazine (Xenazine) which is used to
suppress the involuntary jerking and writhing
movement from HD.
Antipsychotic drugs, such as haloperidol (Haldol)
and chlorpromazine.
Other treatments include staying in good physical
condition and changing to a healthy diet. This has
been known to slow and diminish symptoms.
Treatment
Psychologist can provide therapy to help a person manage behavioral problems,
develop coping strategies, manage expectations during progression of the disease and
facilitate effective communication among family members. Is will help a patent try to
have a more normal life style and it will help them cope with HD.
Huntington's disease can significantly impair control of muscles of the mouth and
throat that are essential for speech, eating and swallowing. A speech therapist can help
improve your ability to speak clearly or teach you to use communication devices such
as a board covered with pictures of everyday items and activities. Speech therapists
An occupational therapist can assist the person with Huntington's disease, family
members and caregivers on the use of assistive devices that improve functional
abilities. These strategies may include, handrails at home, assistive devices for
activities such as bathing and dressing, as well as eating and drinking utensils adapted
for people with limited fine motor skills.
Prognosis
Huntington's disease runs in a full terminal course in 10 to 30 years, and the
earlier the symptoms appear, the faster the disease progresses. Huntington's
disease patients need to be physically active, and exercise as much as
possible. This has been known to slow down and decrease the symptoms. As
well as social activities which gives loved ones valuable time with the
patient. Most people with the disease die from complications like infections,
choking, or pneumonia. Everyone has the HD gene, but HD is caused by a
gene that activates the other gene, which causes the disease. However now
that the both genes have been located, they are studying and trying to find out
how the genes causes this disease.
Error in communication
In Huntington's disease this is really
no error. The problem is that cells
that make up the basal ganglia die.
So the communication in that part
of the brain is nonexistent.
The tissue in this area has been destroyed due to HD
First Biomedical Professional
PsychologistEducation Requirements:
A PH.D in psychology is usually needed to become a Psychologist, along with a one year
internship. Most doctorate programs do no need a undergraduate degree only a masters. There is
also a lot of licenses and Registration that is needed.
Job Description:
They asses, diagnose, and treat mental, emotional and behavioral disorders. Psychologist help
people deal with personal issues. They can do this by giving people a release, teaching them
techniques, and by helping through tough times. They are responsible for treatment and the
wellbeing of their patient.
How they with help their patient:
Psychologist can provide therapy to help a person manage behavioral problems, develop coping strategies,
manage expectations during progression of the disease and facilitate effective communication among family
members. Is will help a patent try to have a more normal life style and it will help them cope with HD.
Second Biomedical Professional
Occupational TherapistsEducation Requirements:
Occupational therapists typically have to have a master’s degree in occupational therapy. They
also have to be licensed by the state.
Job description:
Occupational therapists treat injured, ill, or disabled patients through the therapeutic use of
every day activates. They help them improve skills for every day living and can also
recommend the installation of railing and assistive devices.
How They with help the patient:
An occupational therapist can assist the person with Huntington's disease, family members and
caregivers on the use of assistive devices that improve functional abilities. These strategies
may include, handrails at home, assistive devices for activities such as bathing and dressing,
as well as eating and drinking utensils adapted for people with limited fine motor skills.
Citations
Facts About
By: Ryan C
and Olivia
HD. (n.d.). Retrieved November 14, 2014, from
http://www.hdsa.org/images/content/2/2/v2/22556/HDSA-FastFacts-2-7-14-final.pdf
HDSA Fast Facts. (n.d.). Retrieved November 14, 2014, from http://www.hdsa.org/new-to-hd1/new-to-hd.html
HOPES. (n.d.). Retrieved November 14, 2014, from http://web.stanford.edu/group/hopes/cgibin/wordpress/2010/06/the-basic-neurobiology-of-huntingtons-disease-text-and-audio/#whatparts-of-the-brain-are-most-affected-in-hd-patients
Huntington's Disease Symptoms, Causes, Treatment - How is Huntington's disease diagnosed?
- MedicineNet. (n.d.). Retrieved November 14, 2014, from
http://www.medicinenet.com/huntington_disease/page5.htm
Huntington's Disease Treatment, Prognosis. (n.d.). Retrieved November 14, 2014, from
http://www.healthcommunities.com/huntingtons-disease/treatment.shtml
Summary. (n.d.). Retrieved November 14, 2014, from
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Healthcare/Occupational-therapists.htm
Summary. (n.d.). Retrieved November 14, 2014, from http://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physicaland-social-science/psychologists.htm

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