The Benefits of Academic Intervention Programs

Report
How academic intervention programs
can benefit neglected and delinquent
students
by Paul Lazrow
September 25th, 2012
1
1.
What is an academic intervention program and what
should it accomplish?
2.
Why are academic interventions needed?
3.
What makes a quality intervention program?
4.
How can academic intervention programs benefit
neglected and delinquent students?
2
Well-implemented, quality afterschool
programs have the potential to support and
promote healthy learning and development.
Moreover, there is a research warrant for
continued public and private support for
afterschool investments.
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4
o
o
o
Programs that give academic support to
children beyond the regular classroom
Often these programs are funded through
Federal dollars/programs like Title 1
Programs tailored to meet the needs of
individual students
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o
Focus to raise student achievement
o
Employ research-proven strategies
o
Keep group sizes small
o
Assess and report the results of student
assessments back to the classroom teacher
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

Education is the number one social
justice issue of our times
These service programs are needed
to help students who might
otherwise fall through the cracks of
large public school systems
8
o
o
o
Less than two-thirds of students who enroll in a
four-year college in Pennsylvania will earn a
bachelor's degree within six years
Among students pursuing an associate degree,
only one in three will graduate within three years.
One in three high school graduates who attend
Pennsylvania's public universities and community
colleges need remedial courses math and literacy
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o The US ranks 21st out of 26th OECD counties in H.S.
Graduation.
o The US loses more than a $100 billion/year in lost
revenue, lower economic activity and increased
social service due to our high dropout rate. (We
loose their talent)
o A HS Dropout will cost the nation $260,000 more in
their lifetime that a graduate.
Source: Alliance for Excellent Education
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o
o
o
Offers opportunities for skill building
and mastery
Fosters a culture of continuous
improvement that includes ongoing
assessment and targeted plans
Intentional relationship building with
host schools, participants and families
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o
o
A strong, experienced Site Coordinator who
is supported by a trained and supervised
staff.
Student-level data sharing among schools
and afterschool/summer programs in order
to better meet the needs of students and
assess progress.
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Academic Intervention
Programs are one key
component to Dropout
Prevention Programs
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One statistically valid study, out of the many studies
out there, showed:
o
o
o
Students who drop out of school are more likely to
end up as criminal
3 1/2 times more likely than high school graduates
to be arrested and 8 times as likely to be in jail or
prison
The incidence of institutionalization problems
among young high school dropouts was more than
63 times higher than among young four year
college graduates.
16
o
o
3.8 million kids started High School this year
and about 25% will not make it to graduation
day
Students drop out because:
Bored
Missed too much school
Failed 9th grade
Girl’s: pregnancy (3 out of 4 will end up on public
assistance)
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o
Who is dropping out:
Latinos
Blacks
Whites
Asian/Pacific Islanders
o
47%
43%
17%
10%
What is a “drop outs future:
More likely to abuse drugs
Live in poverty
Go to jail
Unemployment rate is nearly double
18
o
Cost to Society
Lost Wages
Taxable Income
Health Care
Welfare
Incarceration
$319 Billion /year
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There are so many ways to figure out how the drop
out rate relates to people ending up in jail. But as
one superintendent said:
o
"We could spend all of our time trying
to figure out the real numbers, but
we're better off trying to mitigate the
problem.”
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1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Improved test scores and grades
Higher graduation rates
Improved school attendance and
engagement in learning
Promotes self-concept and healthy choices
Helps families and encourages parental
participation
Keeps children safe and healthy
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o
Children who regularly attended high-quality
afterschool programs over two years had 20%
increase in math scores and 12% increase in
language arts scores compared to peers who
were unsupervised afterschool.
(the Promising Afterschool Programs Study)
22
o
H.S. students enrolled in the program for
three or more semesters had higher
graduation rates and lower dropout rates
than similar students not in the program.
(Chapin Hall's study of Chicago's After School Matters)
23
o
a reduction in absences among participants,
from 6.4 days per school year at baseline to
2.19 days per school year at follow-up.
(the Boys & Girls Clubs' national Project Learn)
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The Promising Programs evaluation showed participation
in afterschool programs is linked to “reductions in
behavior problems among disadvantaged students"
including
o significant reductions in aggressive behaviors with
peers
o reductions in misconduct
o reduced use of drugs and alcohol
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Parents in the TASC study said that the program helped
them balance work and family life:
o 94% said the program was convenient
o 60% said they missed less work than before because of the
program
o 59% said it supported them in keeping their job
o 54% said it allowed them to work more hours
o 31% of principals reported that TASC greatly increased
parents' attendance at school events
o 15% reported that it increased parents' attendance at
parent-teacher conferences
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o
o
30 percent less likely to participate in
criminal activities than their peers
Researchers estimated that for every dollar
invested, the program saves the city $2.50 in
crime-related costs.
(An evaluation in Los Angeles)
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
Civic Marshall Plan: Target of 90% Graduation rate by
2020. (4th graders now)
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
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4th grade students need to read well
Middle School they have great attendance
Transform the worst performing High Schools (Dropout Factories)
H.S. the students need to have a clear pathway to adult success
(college, trade school..)
This is a shift towards a culture of caring and excellence
and the Common Core is an example
We can identify the patterns of student who is statistically
likely to drop out and with these early warning systems we
can use interventions to provide support
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o
o
o
o
CLOSE The Achievement Gap - Stop the
summer slide with an academic programs
that includes sports, arts, music, technology,
field trips – “summer enrichment”
?
Engagement
?
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
They don’t see a connection to what they
wanted to be in life and what they were
learning in school.”
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◦
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Bad home situations
Pregnancy
Bullying
Fall too far behind academically
Don’t see that value of education
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