Workshop 18: Global Health Engagement Priorities

Report
Expanding Academic Engagement in
Global Health
TPHA Annual Meeting
Franklin, Tennessee
September 11, 2014
Cathy R. Taylor, DrPH, MSN, RN
Dean and Professor
Gordon E. Inman College of Health Sciences and
Nursing
Belmont University
[email protected]
Objectives
• Describe successful expansion of global health
and service learning efforts in one University
• Discuss facilitators and challenges to global
health education, practice and research
• Discuss next steps and new
opportunities for global
health education, practice
and research
Health Sciences Enrollment
1000
800
600
Total CHS
Total Undergrad
Total Grad
400
200
0
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
Health Sciences at Belmont
• Undergraduate
– Nursing
– Social Work
– Other
• Graduate
– Nursing
– Occupational Therapy
• Doctorate
–
–
–
–
Nursing
Occupational Therapy
Pharmacy
Physical Therapy
• Historic faith-based missions
Faculty Scholarship
• Applied, translational research
 Youth sports-related concussion
 Veterans with TBI
 Compassionate care of the older
adult
 Safe transportation for seniors
 Ballet-related injury
 Safe, effective team-based care
 Scholarship of teaching
 Student transition to practice
The Future of Health Sciences and
Nursing at Belmont
•
•
•
•
Interprofessional teams
Global health focus
Sustainable academic, practice and research partnerships
BU – Live Beyond Partnership in Thomazeau, Haiti
X
Republic of Haiti
• Occupies the western portion of the island of Hispaniola, in the Greater
Antillean archipelago. Borders the Dominican Republic.
• Language
– French & French Creole
• Religion
– 80% Catholic sometimes combined with voudou
– 16% Protestant
• Population*
–
–
–
–
80% of the population below the poverty line
54% in “abject poverty”
75% of the population lives on $2 or less per day
Ineffective reforms and aid because of widespread corruption and the
inefficient judicial framework.
Source: The World Factbook. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-worldfactbook/geos/ha.html
Haiti
Population 1̴ 0.3 million
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
35% of the population is < 15 years old
Median age – 22 years
Adult literacy rate – about 50% adults
Professionally attended births – 25%
Use of modern contraceptive methods – 25%
Infant mortality rate 52/1000 live births
Birth – 5 years death rate 76/1000
Life expectancy – 61 female/64 male
Source: WHO Global Health Observatory. http://apps.who.int/gho/data/node.country.country-HTI Accessed
2/12/14.
Notice
anything
about
these kids?
Community-based Health Impact Programs
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Clean Water Project
Mother & Infant Care
Special Needs Care
Mobile Medical Clinics
Sustainable Agriculture
Education
Vocational Training
Orphan Care
Staff and Volunteers
Sleeping Quarters
The Maternal Care Team
Visiting in the Villages - Annette
The Med Box
Singing with friends.
Facilitators: Education
• Faculty/administration
“buy in” and support
• Incorporating global
engagement in strategic
plans
• Faculty/student interest
• Accessible & reliable
internet resources
• Compatible expectations
Challenges: Education
• Time constraints and
overloaded curricula
• Faculty workload
• International travel costs
• Varied time zones and
schedules make it hard to
schedule interprofessional
educational experiences
• Increasing scope of existing
global activities
• Safety
– Infectious disease
– Civil unrest
Facilitators: Research
• Administrative support and
funding
• Institutional Review Board
support
• Engaged faculty champions
• Measurement, data
collection and research
staff expertise and capacity
Challenges: Research
• IRB and research
ethics review
differences
• Authorship issues
• Data ownership
• Cultural
differences and
expectations
• Indirect costs
Dr. Ruby Dunlap conducts research on adapting
nursing standards in austere conditions in Uganda.
Dunlap, R.K. (2013). Nursing Theory and the Clinical Gaze:
Discovery in Teaching Theory Across a Cultural Divide. Nursing
Science Quarterly, 26, 176-180.
Facilitators: Practice
• Administrative
support
• Local partnerships
• Cultural
competence
• Standardized
practice and
competencies
Challenges: Practice
• Infrastructure
– Differences in practice
standards
– Quality oversight
– Language/translation
– Access to information
– Currency & transfer of funds
• Competition and challenges
with partners and
governmental and NGOs
working in the same country.
X
References
•
•
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•
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•
Ablah E, Biberman DA, Weist EM, et. al., (2014). Improving Global Health
Education: Development of a Global Health Competency Model. American Journal
of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. [Epub ahead of print].
Calhoun JG, Spencer HC, Buekens P. (2011). Competencies for global health
graduate education. Infectious Disease Clinics of North America. 25(3):575-92. viii.
doi: 10.1016/j.idc.2011.02.015.
Dunlap, R.K. (2013). Nursing Theory and the Clinical Gaze: Discovery in Teaching
Theory Across a Cultural Divide. Nursing Science Quarterly, 26, 176-180.
Fitzpatrick J, Shultz C, Aiken T. eds. (2010). Giving through teaching: how nurse
educators are changing the world. NY: Springer.
Harless N. (2010). Nurses beyond borders: true stories of heroism and healing
around the world. NY: Kaplan.
Peluso MJ, Hafler JP, Sipsma H, Cherlin E. (2104). Global health education
programming as a model for inter-institutional collaboration in interprofessional
health education. Journal of Interprofessional Care. [Epub ahead of print]
Reisch R, Boggis TL, Shaffer K, Brown S, Black A. (2011). Description of a model of
interprofessional global education for allied health students. Health and
Interprofessional Practice 1(1):eP1001.
Questions
• What’s missing from this discussion of critical
challenges and facilitators to academic
engagement in global health education, research
and practice?
• What are the most critical global health
competencies?
“From here to anywhere”
Thank You!

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