Integrated Nutrition Powerpoint

Report
The Integrated Nutrition
Education Program (INEP)
Learning Comes Alive through Classroom
Cooking
Presenters
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Diane Brogden, UCHSC, Stanley BPS
Heather Owen, UCHSC, Stanley BPS
Stanley BPS Intern Training
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3:30-3:45 What is the Integrated Nutrition Education
Program?
3:45-4:45 Invent-a-Salsa
INEP Program Partners
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University of Colorado Denver
SNAP-Ed/Colorado State University
Cooking Matters
COWP-Culture of Wellness Programs
Denver Urban Gardens
Colorado Health Foundation
Stanley British Primary School
USDA School Lunch Programs
King Soopers, Albertson’s, Western Dairy Council
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
BRFSS, 1990, 2000, 2010
(*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs. overweight for 5’4” person)
2000
1990
2010
No Data
<10%
10%–14%
15%–19%
20%–24%
25%–29%
≥30%
Who We Are
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Elementary school program.
Multi-year (K-5th), 12 to 20
lessons/year.
Hands-on nutrition education
program.
Utilize classroom teachers to
increase student reach and
health impact.
Promote connections
between classroom,
lunchroom and home to
improve health messaging.
Outcome Objectives
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•
Increase knowledge of and
attitudes towards fruits and
vegetables.
Improve self-efficacy regarding
food prep and fruit/vegetable
intake.
Increase exposure to new foods
and improve food preferences.
Link Fruit/Vegetable Consumption in Classroom
to Lunchroom and Home.
In the Classroom
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Experiential, hands on,
food prep and tasting.
Exposure to wide
variety of fruits and
vegetables.
Integrated into Science
and Literacy standards.
Bilingual recipes and
activity sheets.
Key Curriculum Elements
Write on the Chalkboard

Isolate one simple
behavior in each
lesson.

Use goal-setting.
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Use “self-talk” or “think
aloud” to verbalize how
to make a behavior
happen.
“Eat more vegetables every
day!”
What was your favorite vegetable
in today’s salad?
How do you plan to eat more
vegetables today?
What new vegetable would you
like to try with your family?
Hands on Nutrition lessons
change eating behaviors and
enhance learning.
Provide opportunity to try new
foods.
Try new foods in a
non-threatening environment
Capitalize on Positive Peer
Pressure
Teach food preparation skills.
Encourage teamwork in small
groups.
From the Classroom to the Family
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Newsletters to
families with nutrition
tips and recipes 3 times a year.
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Take home recipes
connected to lessons.
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Book Bags for 2nd graders.
Parent Education
Parent Nights
Parent Classes
La Cocina Soludable
Bilingual classes
Lesson schedule
Mesa County Valley School District 51 Lesson Calendar: 2012/2013
Mont
h
Sept 24
1
Kinder
Lessons
1 Grade
Lessons
2nd Grade
Lessons
3rd Grade
Lessons
4th Grade
Lessons
5th Grade
Lessons
Parent Letter
Parent Letter
Parent Letter
Parent Letter
Parent Letter
Parent Letter
MyPlate Snack Mix
MyPlate Food Groups
MyPlate Sort
MyPlate Bingo
MyPlate - Cut & Paste
MyPlate Colorado Wildlife
8 Germs Are Not for Sharing Wash Your Hands
Oct
Hooray for Hand WashingKeeping Busy Hands Clean Being a Germ Scientist
Germ Scientists
15
22
Nov
29 Manners for Dinosaur
Manners
Manners
Manners
Manners
Skeletal System
5
12
Families
Families
Families
Families
Food Energy from Sun
Mind Your Manners
Apple Farmer Annie
Pumpkin Circle
Tasty Cheese Man
Still Life
Fresh Salsa
Digestive system
My Five Senses
Moonsquirter Salad
English Muffin Pizza
Dairy Fairy
Yogurt is Alive
Kwanzaa Salad
Exercise Zoo
Move Your Body
Carlos & the "Squashed" Salad
Ask Exercise Kid
Exercise Kid /Couch Potato
Calorie Balance
Chinese New Year
Fruity Milkshake
Chinese Tangrams
Chinese Zodiac
Chinese Calligraphy
Fat and Fast Food
25
Little Red Hen
Fruit Pizza
Healthy Heart
Jazzy Sweet Fruit Salad
Fruit Riddles
Portion Distortion
4
11
Tortilla Factory
Bread, Bread, Bread
Parts of the Plant Salad
Parts of Plant: Seeds
Find the Fat
Cesar Chavez
1
8
Vegetable Bug
Blueberries for Me
Bean Bag Salad
Parts of Plant: Leaves &
Whole Grains
Vitamin C
15
Rainbow of Health
Bingo Salsa
Taste Your Words
Graphing Your Fav. Veg
Pizza Pie
Invent-a-Salsa
19
26
3
10
Dec 17
24
31
Jan
7
14
21
28
4
Feb 11
18
Mar
18
25
Apr
22
29
May
No INEP Delivery
INEP Book List
Kindergarten
Apple Farmer
Annie
Chinese New
Year
Book
Apple Farmer Annie by
Monica Wellington
Dragon Dance by Joan
Holub
1st Grade
Bingo Salsa
Book
Fruit and Vegetable
Bingo Game
Blueberries for Sal by
Robert McCloskey
2nd Grade
Bean Bag Salad
Exercise Zoo
From Head to Toe by Eric
Carle
Families by Ann Morris
Bread, Bread,
Bread
Manners
Bread, Bread, Bread by
Ann Morris
No More Vegetables by
Nicole Rubel
Chinese
Tangrams
English Muffin
Pizza
Germs Are Not for
Sharing by Elizabeth
Verdick
The Little Red Hen
Families
Families/Apple
Tuna Salad
Manners for
Dinosaurs
How Do Dinosaurs Eat
Their Food? by Jane
Yolen
Fruity Milkshake
Let's Eat by Ana Amorano
or Full, Full, Full of Love
by Trish Cooke
I Like Fruit by Lorena
Siminovich
Kiss the Cow by Phyllis
My Five Senses
My Five Senses by Aliki
Moonsquirters
Salad
Manners
MyPlate Snack
Mix
Rainbow of
Health
Tortilla Factory
Food Pictures
Move Your Body,
Clap Your Hands
MyPlate Food
Groups
Pumpkin Circle
I Will Never NOT EVER
Eat a Tomato by Lauren
Child
Clap Your Hands by
Lorinda Bryan Cauley
Food Pictures
Families
Germs Are Not
for Sharing
Little Red Hen
Vegetable Bug
Growing Colors by Bruce
McMillan
The Tortilla Factory by
Gary Paulsen
Cucumber Soup by Vickie
Leigh Krudwig
Blueberries for
Me
Fruit Pizza
Wash Your Hands
Carlos and the
"Squashed" Salad
Healthy Heart
Hooray for Hand
Washing
MyPlate Sort
Parts of the Plant
Salad
Pumpkin Circle by George Taste Your
Levenson
Words
Wash Your Hands by
Tasty Cheese
Tony Ross
Man
Book
How a Seed Grows by
Helene J. Jordan
Carlos and the Squash
Plant by Jan Romero
Stevens
Grandfather Tang's Story
by Ann Tompert
The Little Red Hen Makes
a Pizza by Philemon
Sturges
The Relatives Came by
Cynthia Rylant
Hear Your Heart by Paul
showers
Those Mean Nasty Dirty
Downright Disgusting but
Invisible Germs by Judith
Anne Rice
Piggy Monday by
Suzanne Bloom
Bag of food pictures
Vegetables! Vegetables!
by Fay Robinson
Vegetable Garden by
Douglas Florian
Stinky Cheese Man by
Jon Scieszka
INEP Peak #’s and Current
2010-2011:
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21 districts
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109 schools
 1,321 classrooms
 ≈36,000 students
& families
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2013-2014:
18 districts
40 schools
360 classrooms
≈7,800 students &
families
Program Results
Increased knowledge and food preparation
self-efficacy.
 Increased food preferences.
 Behavior change as well as knowledge
change.
 Increased consumption
of fruits and vegetables
in the lunchroom.
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Evaluation Results
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99% of teachers reported that their students
were more knowledgeable about nutrition.
90% of teachers reported that their students
were more willing to try new foods.
72% of INEP students indicated that they eat
more fruits and vegetables.
About one in four students self-report a
reduction in their consumption of soda/pop.
Comments
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“The INEP activities helped build positive
collaboration…The recipe ‘projects’ are real life
episodes that engage active learning and the
teacher doesn’t have to take time to go
shopping for supplies or create materials or
find resources, but the students receive
enriching information….” INEP Teacher
Comments
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“ The are likely to eat it when the recipes are
from school. They feel proud when they made
it in school.” INEP Parent
Julie Atwood, MNM
Program Manager
University of Colorado Denver
(303) 724-4457
[email protected]
http://inep.ucdenver.edu

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