Bibliographic Research

Report
MABC Thesis
Research
Go to The Master’s College
Library Web site:
http://www.masters.edu/library
© Janet Tillman/The Master’s College, 2006-2010, permission is granted for non-profit
educational use; any reproduction or modification should include this statement.
Topics to Titles
• Thesis
• Basic Research Tools
• Effective Research
• Using the Library
• Practice: Topic to Titles
Thesis Defined
• The word "thesis” comes from the
Greek θέσις, meaning "position", and
refers to an intellectual proposition.
• A proposition laid down or stated, esp.
as a theme to be discussed and
proved, or to be maintained against
attack; a statement, assertion, tenet.
(OED)
Thesis Defined
• Claim of Fact
–Something is true
• Claim of Value
–Something has benefit
• Claim of Policy
–Something ought to be done this
way; think this way; function in a
particular manner; behavior
Thesis Defined
• A typical thesis has a title page, an
abstract, a table of contents, a body,
comprising the various chapters, and a
bibliography.
Thesis Defined
• Proposition/Claim = Thesis Statement
• Body = argument supporting the
claim/thesis
• Evidence = conduct research to find the
evidence that proves/disproves the
claim
– Previously existing evidence See Miss T.
– Conduct your own studies
Thesis Explained
• Begins at the end
• States your conclusion
• Gives supporting evidence for proof
• Think “thesis question” not “thesis topic”
• A question intriguing enough to take a
year or more to answer.
Thesis Selected
• Ask a question specific enough for the
length of the paper
• Ask a question of interest to you; ask a
question to which you want to know the
answer
• Ask a question that appeals to a wide
readership
• Ask a question with sufficient sources to
substantiate your claim
Thesis Developed
• Ask and answer “So what?”
(Turabian, 7th, chapters 2 & 5)
• What is your claim?
• What reasons support it?
Turabian 7th, p50.
Thesis Developed
• What evidence supports those
reasons?
• How do you respond to objections and
alternative views?
• How are your reasons relevant to your
claim?
Turabian 7th, p50.
Thesis Developed
• Plan and refine along the way
• State your basic and subsidiary
questions
• Lay out the research you intend to
use to find the answers
Peters, 1997 p. 177.
More Thesis Help
• Peters, Robert L. Getting what you came
for: the smart student’s guide to earning a
master’s or a Ph.D. Rev. ed. N.Y.: Noonday
Press, 1997. ISBN: 0374524777 [378.24
P442g, 1997]
• Booth, Wayne, Gregory G. Colomb and
Joseph M. Williams. The Craft of Research.
2nd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago
Press, 2003. ISBN: 0-226-06568-5
Basic Research Tools
• Library Catalog  identify and locate
all the materials available in and
through the library: books, ebooks, CD’s,
DVD’s, videos, MP3’s, Journals, etc.
• Indexes  periodical articles
• Databases  theses, dissertations,
multi-author works, proceeding, reports,
other scholarly document, etc.
Use Sources to Find Other Sources
Effective Research
• Use Sources to Find More
Sources
–This is the key to doing effective
research
–This is research
–Find related material on a topic
–Leads to primary sources
Use what you know to find
what you don’t know
• Key terms (persons, places, events,
professional jargon)
• Reputed scholars
• Subject headings, descriptors
• Library Classification numbers (DDC,
LC)
• References Cited (Authors, Titles)
Effective Research
• USE SOURCES TO FIND OTHER SOURCES
– From the Work – (aka Citation searching):
Bibliography, References Cited, Endnotes
– From the Bibliographic Record: Authors, Titles,
Subject Headings, Call Numbers, Descriptors,
Tables of Contents
– From the Text: Glean keywords, persons, places,
events, professional jargon, colloquialisms, variant
spellings
Added benefit
• The key terms, professional
jargon, colloquialisms,
persons, places, events you
discover through this process
could and often times should
be used in the paper itself.
Go to the Library Web site:
masters.edu/library
OR
Peruse Library’s Web Site
Library Catalog
Basic Search
LCSH viz a viz DDC
• Library of Congress Subject Headings
(LCSH)
– standardized controlled vocabulary
– Identify resources on the same topic
• Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC)
– Arranges materials on the shelves (address
of the item)
– Materials on the same subject will be in the
same vicinity
Bibliographic Record
Basic: Alpha/Numeric Fields
• Subject (Left Anchored)
• Call number
• Name Title
Searches terms
found in an
alpha/numeric
listing of the
selected field
Subject (Left Anchored)
Particularly useful …
• for identifying proper Library of
Congress Subject Headings (LCSH)
• for a more focused search
• when at a loss to know what search
term to use
Subject (Left Anchored)
Particularly useful …
• for identifying library content, strengths,
and weaknesses within a field
• for finding more sources
• for identifying alternative search terms
Basic Search – Subject (Left
Anchored)
Basic Search – Subject (Left
Anchored)
Basic Search – Subject (Left
Anchored)
Use Sources to find
other sources
Subject Tab
Subject Tab
Basic Search - Summary
• Subject (Left Anchored) and the
Subject tab are extremely useful for
identifying LC Subject headings,
additional terminology and library
holdings
• Expand or focus your search query
• Start your research with a Subject
search
Online Catalog - Advanced Search
Advanced Search
Advanced Search
Combine Boolean operations
Multiple
Field
Selections
Advanced Search
Advanced Search
Advanced Search
Advanced Search – Brief Record
Full Bibliographic Record
Use Sources to find
other sources
Advanced Search Summary
• Searches the entire bibliographic record or
selected field
• Boolean operations can be combined with
multiple field selections to refine a search
• Key items in the bibliographic record can
be used to evaluate the work and to further
your research (e.g. date, call number,
subject headings, contents, additional
authors, etc.)
Practice: topic to titles
• Basic Search – Subject (Left Anchored)
– Find LC subject heading related to your topic
– Identify related terms (See, See Also, NOTE)
• Link to Titles list
– Mark relevant records
• Record Options
– Email selected titles to yourself
– Save selected records to “My List”
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Access eBooks: “Online Resource:”
Remote Access to E-Books
• MasterNet id/password
Remote Access to E-Books
www.netlibrary.com
“Create
(while on campus)
a free account”
Find Journals
Find Journals
eIndexes providing full-text
to journal articles
Find Journals
Find Journals
+ = continuing subscription
[ ] = missing issues
BD = Bound
Find Journals Summary
• Tells you what journal titles the
library subscribes to; both print and
electronic
• Especially useful when an article
from a cited reference is needed
• eIndexes listed are limited to only
those that provide full-text
Now you know …
• Library Catalog will tell you what books
the library has.
– Basic (Subject Left Anchored) and Subject tab
are good for finding LC Subject Headings
– Advanced Search provides multiple search
options
• Find Journals will tell you what journals
the library has.
• Using sources to find sources
Use Sources to find sources
• Library catalog
– Subject searches = See, See also, Note
references for alternative terminology
– Bibliographic record = authors, call
numbers, subject headings, TOC for
additional terminology, series
• Reading & Research
– Cited references, Bibliographies, jargon,
persons, places, events, keywords, etc.
Questions …
?
Discovering Databases
• Databases and Indexes / Find Articles &
eReferences
• Practice: Discover Database Distinctives
• Devising Effective Search Queries
• Practice: Devise a Search Query
• Evaluation
Databases and Indexes
• Online Databases are tools that store
information in digital form
Specifically with regard to
bibliographic research they are
• Tools that contain at the very least
citations to Articles and other kinds
of scholarly documents
Databases and Indexes
• Online Periodical Indexes are tools that provide
access to periodical literature – FIND ARTICLES
– Magazines, journals, newspapers
– Academic Search, CPI, ProQuest, R&TA, NTA,
OTA, GSSR
• “Databases” are those that contain other kinds of
scholarly information - eReferences
– Books, proceedings, government documents,
theses/dissertations, encyclopedias, music, etc.
– Historic Documents, Gale Virtual Reference,
Classical Music Library, WorldCat
eReferences
Databases and Indexes
• Some indexes index both periodicals
and other kinds of scholarly information
– ATLAR, ERIC, Lexis/Nexis, America:
History & Life, Historical Abstracts, OVRC,
EconLit
– Use Find Articles
• Some Indexes are print; not online
– Readers’ Guide to Periodical Literature,
Higher Education Abstracts
Periodical Indexes
• All provide citations
– Author, title of article, journal name, volume, issue,
date, page numbers
– Print or electronic
• Most indexes also provide abstracts
– Summary of the article
– Print or electronic
• Many also provide the full-text
– Actual text of the article is online
– Electronic
Indexes to Periodicals:
Tools for finding Articles
• Interdisciplinary Indexes
– Covers journals from many disciplines
– Academic Search, ProQuest Research
Library, Opposing Viewpoints Resource
Center (OVRC), Periodical Abstracts,
Wilson Select Plus
Indexes to Periodicals:
Tools for finding Articles
• Subject Specific Indexes
– Covers a particular discipline
– ATLAReligion (ATLAR), Arts & Humanities
Citation Index, Christian Periodical Index
(CPI), Health Source, PsycFirst
Indexes to Periodicals:
Tools for finding Articles
•No all inclusive Index
•Several Indexes needed to cover a topic
•Become familiar with primary indexes in
your discipline
Accessing Online Indexes
Identify Appropriate Online
Indexes: Digging Deeper
• Resist the urge to jump right in and start
searching
• Be an efficient and effective researcher
• Save time and lessen frustration
Identify Appropriate Online
Indexes: Digging Deeper
• Description
– “About”;
,
– Provider (author, publisher, vendor)
• Content of the database’s records
– Bibliographic records, Citations, Abstracts, Fulltext
– Index, Directory, eBooks
• Subject content
– Focused; Subject specific – ERIC, ATLAR
– Interdisciplinary – ProQuest, Academic Search
Identify Appropriate Online
Indexes: Digging Deeper
• Scope of Coverage
– Topics covered and not covered
– Depth of coverage on a given topic
• Number of resources
• Type of documents
– Types of documents included
• Books, journals, newspapers, thesis, dissertations,
proceedings, gov’t docs, reports
• Web sites, images, sound
Identify Appropriate Online
Indexes: Digging Deeper
• Dates of Coverage
– Mid ‘80’s to present
– Indexing coverage extends beyond full-text
coverage
– Lag time (embargo)
• Audience
– Professionals, Researchers
– Academic, Public
– Youth, Children
Learning about a
database/index will help you…
• Identify the best tool(s) for the job
• Know what it does and does not do
• Know how best to use it
• Devise a more efficient search query to
retrieve the best records.
Databases Indexes Summary
• The library’s databases and indexes are used to
find articles and other research resources
• The Find Articles Web page is the main access
point for all of them
• The Topic/Type matrix provides a comprehensive
list of all the databases and indexes supporting
each major field of study
• Learn “About” and examine “Help” so your search
efforts are as efficient and effective as possible.
QUIZ
• The Find Journals page is used to find
magazines and journals held by TMC Library
• The Library Catalog is used to find books and
other resources available in and through the
library
• The Find Articles page is used to access the
online tools that will Find Articles and other
research documents for you
Questions …
?
Break Time
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Using Find Articles
• Search Modes
– Basic/Advanced/Visual
– Publication/Source
– Subject/Topics/Browse Index
• Fields
– Author, title, subject, source = journal title
Using Find Articles
• Limiting options
– Language, date, document type, peer reviewed
/scholarly, full-text
• Expanding options
– SmartText (EBSCO)
– Apply related words/Synonyms
– Search the Full-text
– Suggested Topics
– More like this
Using Find Articles
• Sorting/Ranking options
• Help
– Preferences/Defaults: single vs. plural,
records per page, detail displayed for each
result
– Boolean, Phrasing, Proximity, Field Codes
– Wildcards, Truncation
• Search Tips
Using Find Articles
• Language Interface
• Translate document
• Profile/Search Alerts/RSS Feeds
– New documents automatically sent to your
email or RSS Feed
• Durable links or Copy Link
Using Find Articles
• Print, Email, Save, Export records
– Multiple Citation Styles
– Create bibliographies
• Linking (Using Sources to Find
Sources)
– Cited References search
– Related Records/Find more like this search
– Find a copy/Search for Article:
Check for Full Text
• When full-text article is not available in the
current database
• Provides links to the full-text in other online
indexes
• Searches the Library Catalog for in-house
Find Journals
Check for Full Text
Check for Full Text
Using Find Articles
•
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Help
Search Tips
Search Modes
Fields
Limiting Features
Export Options
•
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•
•
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Search History
Search Alerts
Durable Links
Cited References
Related Records
New Features
Be an Efficient and Effective Researcher!
WorldCat (FirstSearch)
WorldCat (FirstSearch)
WorldCat - FirstSearch
WorldCat - FirstSearch


WorldCat - FirstSearch
WorldCat - FirstSearch
WorldCat - FirstSearch
Summary Database Discovery
• Databases and Indexes are the best
tools for finding articles and a variety of
other kinds of scholarly documents
including eReference books.
• Identify appropriate databases and
indexes for the research need by
reading About and
Summary Database Discovery
• Examine each database and index to
discover it’s unique features and
functions so your research is as effective
and efficient as possible
• Read Help,
and Search Tips
• Use Check for Full Text to find articles
when the index or database being used
does not provide the full-text
Summary Database Discovery
• Use “Find Articles” link on the library Web
site to access links to periodical indexes
which are then used to find articles on
your topic.
• Use “eReferences” link on the library Web
site to access links to softcopy reference
books for background information on your
topic.
Practice: Discover Database
Distinctives
•Compare ATLAR and Academic Search
•What search mode is unique with each?
•Describe the content of each, include topics
covered, dates of coverage, audience
•Name one unique field option with each
•How can you tell what Journals are indexed with
each?
•Name one Limiting feature that is
•unique from each other
•the same with both
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Lunch Break
Review
Thesis – “So what?”
Use Sources To Find Sources
Using the Library
Thesis Developed
• Ask and answer “So what?”
(Turabian, 7th, chapters 2 & 5)
• What is your claim?
• What reasons support it?
Turabian 7th, p50.
Effective Research
• USE SOURCES TO FIND OTHER SOURCES
– From the Work – (aka Citation searching):
Bibliography, References Cited, Endnotes
– From the Bibliographic Record: Authors, Titles,
Subject Headings, Call Numbers, Descriptors
– From the Text: Glean keywords, persons, places,
events, professional jargon, colloquialisms, variant
spellings
Using the Library
• Examine the Library’s Web site ; the starting
point and primary access point for your
research.
• Use the Library Catalog to find books and
other resources in and through the library.
– Find LC Subject Headings using Basic – Subject
(Left Anchored) and/or the Subject tab
– Access ebooks
• Use Find Journals page to find journals held
by the library (print and electronic).
Review
• Use Find Journals on the library Web
site to find Journals held by the TMC
library either in print or full-text in an
online index
• Use Find Articles on the library Web
site to find articles and other scholarly
information
• Key to research: “Use Sources to find
Sources”
Review
• Use Check for Full Text to find articles
when the index being used does not
provide the full-text
• Use indexes & databases efficiently and
effectively by examining: Help,
, ,
limiting features and search options
• Key to research: “Use Sources to find
Sources”
Use Sources to find sources
• Library catalog
– Subject searches = See, See also, Note
references for alternative terminology
– Bibliographic record = authors, call
numbers, subject headings, TOC for
additional terminology, series
Use Sources to find sources
• Databases & Indexes
– Bibliographic records – authors, TOC,
descriptors, abstracts, series, cited
references, “More like this”, “Suggested
Topics”
• Reading & Research
– Cited references, Bibliographies, jargon,
persons, places, events, keywords, etc.
Questions …
?
Devising an Effective Search
Query
• Necessary for efficient and effective
online searching
• Results (hit list) affected by choice of
database
• Results affected by choice and
placement of terminology
Devising an Effective Search
Query
• Know Database Content
• Consider relationship of search terms
within the database
• Consider relationship of terms to each
other
• Apply Boolean Logic and other Limiting
options to extract needed records
Biographical
Biological
Theological
Used by permission
from Katie Custis
Devising an Effective Search
Query
• Punctuation and case ignored (e.g.
no need to put in commas, hyphenate
or capitalize terms)
• Do not search with whole sentences
– Use unique key terms or phrases
– Avoid very common terms (unless they
are part of a phrase)
Devising an Effective Search
Query
• Avoid searching as keywords terms
that are very common terms for the
database being searched:
– “Bible” in theological library catalog like
TMC would be overwhelming but not so in
a public library catalog.
– “Education” as a keyword in an education
database
Devising an Effective Search
Query
• The larger the database the narrower the
search query (ERIC, A&H Citation Index;
Google)
• The smaller the database the broader the
search query (Primary Search; EBSCO
Animals)
• Consider the content of the database in
relation to its size
• ATLAR viz a viz CPI
• TMC Library Catalog viz a viz WorldCat
Devising an Effective Search
Query
• Subject Specific databases
– Limited terms
– Unique terms
– Balance broader search terms with
narrower field selections and additional
unique terms
Devising an Effective Search
Query
• Interdisciplinary Databases
– Multiple terms
– Unique terminology relative to database
content
Evaluate Results
• Kind of records retrieved
– How well do they meet the information
need?
• Examine search query syntax
– Parenthetical operations performed first
– Priority of operations
• Number of hits
• Meaning of the search terms used
Adjust Search Query As
Needed
• Broaden/Narrow Search
– Change Boolean operations
– Should one or more of the terms be truncated
– Change the position of terms within the
search query
– Change field selections
– Change limiting options
• Change terminology
Practice: Devising a Search Query
• Search your topic in WorldCat
• Then go to the TMC catalog and do the
same search.
• Compare your results.
• Then Evaluate your WorldCat search
query
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Evaluate Everything
• Evaluate each resource found
• Physical AND Electronic
• Use the General Research Guide “Evaluating
Resources”
• Go to Research Guides  General Research Guides
 “Evaluating Resources”
Evaluate Everything
• Consider the following:
– Purpose and Scope of the material
– Source, Authorship, Publishing Body
with regard to authority and scholarship
– Content and Currency as to its reliability
and relevance
– Style and Functionality relating to it
organization and ease of use
– Bias look for balance
– Verifiability
Evaluate Everything
• Evaluating Information Sources
http://library.duke.edu/services/instruction
/libaryguide/evaluating.html
• Critically Analyzing Information Sources
http://www.library.cornell.edu/olinuris/ref/r
esearch/skill26.htm
• Finding and Evaluating Sources
http://wp.rutgers.edu/courses/201/tutoram
a/finding_and_evaluating_sources_I.html
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Secular Indexes
ProQuest Research Library
Academic Search Premier
Opposing Viewpoints
Resource Center (OVRC)
Secular Indexes
WilsonSelectPlus (FirstSearch)
Health Source Nursing (EBSCO)
Health Source Consumer (EBSCO)
Secular Databases
WorldCat Dissertations (FirstSearch)
ERIC (EBSCO)
ERIC.gov
PsycFirst (FirstSearch)
COLA: Psychology Collection
http://www.colapublib.org/periodicals/index.html
Secular Databases
Encyclopaedia Britannica Online
Annual Review of Psychology
Credo Reference Online (Credo)
Oxford Reference Online (ORO)
Religious Indexes
Christian Periodical Index (CPI)
ATLAReligion (FirstSearch)
New Testament Abstracts (EBSCO)
Old Testament Abstracts (EBSCO)
ATLAReligion (FirstSearch)
ATLAR (FirstSearch)
ATLAR (FirstSearch)
ATLAR (FirstSearch)
ATLAR (FirstSearch)
Religious Databases
Early English Books Online
World Christian Database
Cambridge Companions Online (CCO)
Cambridge Histories Online (CaHO)
Review: Discovering Databases
• Databases and Indexes are the best
tools for finding articles and other kinds
of scholarly documents.
• Carefully examine each database to
discover it’s unique features and
functions; read Help and Search Tips
Review: Discovering Databases
• Use Check for Full Text to find articles when
the index being used does not provide the
full-text
• Devise effective search queries by
considering the relationships of your search
terms to the database content, to each other
and by applying appropriate Limiting or
Expanding options
Review: Discovering Databases
• Evaluate resources by considering the
– Purpose and Scope
– Authority and Scholarship
– Content and Currency
– Style and Functionality
– Bias
– Verifiability (especially the public
Web)
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Research Tips & Techniques
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Online Search Tips
Selecting Search Terms
Recognize Citation Types
Intelligent Internet
Searching
• Interlibrary Loan (ILL)
• MABC Thesis
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TREN
Research Tools
Research Guides
Tutorials
Turabian Helps
Copyright
Reference Services
Bibliography
Online Searching Tips - Titles
• Pull unique key terms from Title and search
as “all of these” (AND) in Title field (books,
articles, journals, films, etc.)
– The more terms you use the greater the chance
of a false negative
– Familiar titles may not be accurate titles
• Cataloger’s the Title from the title page not the cover
of the book
• Cover title: Then and Now Bible Maps – won’t find
• Title page: Then and Now Bible Map Book – will find
Online Searching Tips - Titles
• Don’t search the article “A”, “An”, or “The” if
and only if, they are the first word in the
title (of a book, an article, a journal, a film,
etc.)
• Don’t search with Subtitles
– unless necessary to narrow search (e.g.
Works; Letters);
• be sure to AND the terms and search using
Keyword field.
• DON’T use colon
Online Searching Tips - Names
Do not search using forms of address or academic
credentials with a personal name (e.g. Dr., Mr., Ms,
Ph.D., MBA, etc.) except when searching for
monarchs
Use last name only when searching Authors
Unless it is very common, then add first initial
adams j
If this is still very common, then use the whole
first name
adams jay
Online Searching Tips: Names
Online Searching Tips - Names
• To find Biographies search last name in the
Subject field
– If very common, try adding first name [AND or
Phrase]
• macarthur john (eliminates all those records on Douglas)
– Only use first initial if s/he is only known as such
• lewis c (as in C. S. Lewis)
• Only search [first name last name] as a phrase
using Keyword Anywhere
– Do not search [first name last name] in Author field
or Subject field
Online Searching Tips
• ? = truncation command
– aka “Wildcard”
– Means “to cut off”
– Search engine commanded to find root word and
all right ended variables
• Counsel =.counselful, counsellable, -elable,
counseled, -elled, counselee, -ellee, counselees, ellees, counselless, counseling, -elling, counsellor, elor, counsellorship, counselment, counsels
• Very useful command for expanding a search concept
– Other Wildcards include: * !
Online Searching Tips
NOTE: Words that work best with ? are
those that are unique in their truncated
form.
For example, if you search for sin?
thinking that you will find sins, sinful, or
sinner.
Your results will also include since,
sincere, single and so on.
Selecting Search Terms
• LC Subject headings, Descriptors,
Keywords
– Find using Library Catalog
• Basic Search  Subject (Left Anchored)
• Subject tab
– Use Biblical Counseling Research
Guide for a list of some noteworthy
headings to get you started
Selecting Search Terms
• Synonyms – Thesaurus
– Thesaurus of Psychological Index
Terms [025.49 T343t, 2007]
*
– Roget’s II (Credo) – eReference
– Oxford American Thesaurus of Current
English (ORO) - eReference
*
Selecting Search Terms
• Oxford English Dictionary Online –
(OED) definitions, etymology
• Find Articles  Keyword
• search a truncated form of a broad topic
• “thesaurus”, “psyc”, “medic”, “theol”,
“quot”
• Accessible anytime anywhere with
your MasterNet id/password
Selecting Search Terms
• Dictionaries/Encyclopedias of Theology, Bible,
Religion: Use library catalog Subject tab
Selecting Search Terms
• Broader/narrower/related terms
• Professional jargon, colloquialisms
• Persons, places, events
• Variant endings, Variable spellings
(British cf. Colonial English)
Recognize Citation Types
• Journal article will have two titles: an
Article Title followed by a Journal Title
(usually abbreviated); volume and issue
numbers often included
• Book will have a City and Publisher
• Dissertation or thesis will say “dissertation”
or “thesis” respectively
• Online sources will have URL
Internet Searching
To Surf or not to Surf
Internet Evaluation
• Evaluating Web Pages: Techniques to Apply &
Questions to Ask, UC Berkeley - Teaching Library
Internet Workshops
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/Guides/Internet/
Evaluate.html
• Evaluating Information Found on the Internet, Johns
Hopkins University http://www.library.jhu.edu/researchhelp/general/evaluatin
g/
• Evaluating Web Pages, Duke University http://www.lib.duke.edu/libguide/evaluating_web.htm
• Evaluating Website Chart – Purdue University
– http://www.lib.purdue.edu/rguides/studentinstruction/evaluation/
websiteevaluationchart.html
Internet Tutorials
• http://www.internettutorials.net/
• http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib
/Guides/Internet/BeyondGoogleEvaluationWeb.ppt
• Find more with a Google search:
– search engine tutorials
Tips for using Search Engines
and Subject Directories
•Go to University at Albany
•http://library.albany.edu/usered/iguides
/iguides-strategies.html
•University of Berkley
•http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLi
b/Guides/Internet/SubjDirectories.html
How to Choose
•Search Engines and Subject Directories
http://library.albany.edu/usered/iguides/iguidesglance.html
•Annotated list of search engines, subject
directories, etc.
•http://www.lib.utk.edu/refs/search.html
•http://www.internettutorials.net/subject.asp
•Academic & Professional
•Commercial Directories & Portals
Intelligent Searching
• Use specialized scholarly directory
services
– Created and maintained by scholars,
librarians and subject specialists
– sites are hand selected and evaluated
by human beings not machines
– Often provide critical annotations
Intelligent Searching –
Subject Directories
Intelligent Searching –
Subject Directories
Interlibrary Loan Services
• A voluntary system of sharing materials
between libraries
• Provides access to items not currently
available in our own library collection
• Or not available in full-text through our
online databases
Interlibrary Loan
Before requesting ILL …
• Check TMC Holdings through
– Link to Full text; Search for article;
– Find Journals Web page
• Print citations
• Guide to Social Science & Religion (GSSR)
• Religious & Theological Abstracts (R&TA)
– Library Catalog
Check for Full Text
Check for Full Text - Interlibrary
Loan
Check Library
Catalog or Find
Journals before
ordering ILL to
be sure TMC
does not have
the item
needed.
Interlibrary Loan - FirstSearch
Interlibrary Loan
Check Library Catalog or Find Journals before
ordering ILL to be sure TMC does not have the item
needed.
MABC Thesis
TREN -
www.tren.com
• Theological Resources Exchange
Network
– Index of religious theses and dissertations
– Special edoc pricing for TMC/S students
• $1 per title; pay at circulation desk
• Only accessible from campus
www.tren.com
www.tren.com
www.tren.com
www.tren.com
www.tren.com
And there you have it!
Identify Available Research
Tools
• Libraries, Archives & Research Centers
• Online Databases and Indexes (print
and electronic)
– COLA – LA County Residents
– San Francisco Public Library (SFPL):
residents of CA state – in person proof of
residency required to get ecard
Identify Available Research
Tools
• Handbooks, manuals, directories
• Bibliographies
• Chambers of Commerce, Social Service
Centers, Counseling Centers
• Internet –
– Academic research use Scholarly Subject
Directories
– Commercial enterprises, people, places, events
use public search engines
Get More Help
• The following are additional sources of
information to help with your research.
• All are available in the library or on the
library Web site
– www.masters.edu/library
Research Guides
Research Guides
Research Guides
Reference Services
• “Ask-A-Librarian” on the library Web site
under Library Services
• Contact Miss. T. :
– 661-362-2201
– Hours: M-R 1:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.;
7:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.;
F 10:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.
• No special grace given to those who insist
on working alone
Turabian Helps
• Instructions for inserting page numbers for
Turabian
– a Tutorial on the Research Guides Web page.
• StyleEase Software*
– www.styleease.com
– Formats entire papers from title page to
bibliography
– Available styles includes Turabian
*I have only heard about this product and cannot yet
vouch for its effectiveness. Never-the-less thought
you would want to know it exists.
Copyright: Educational Fair Use
Fair Use Checklist
Bibliography
• Research Strategies: Finding Your Way
through the Information Fog, 3rd ed.
(Lincoln, NE: iUniverse.com, 2008).
– ISBN: 978-0-595-47747-0 ($18.95US).
– Adobe e-book, ISBN: 978-0-595-60504-0
($6.00US).
– http://www.acts.twu.ca/lbr/papered.htm#Details
Bibliography
Turabian, Kate L. A manual for writers of research
papers, theses, and dissertations. 7th ed. Chicago :
University of Chicago Press, 2007. ISBN: 978-0-22682337-9; [808.02 T84m, 2007]
Part 1 Excellent guide on how to write a paper
Part 2 Citation style
Carefully scan chapters 15 and 16 for instructions
on basic citation format.
**Read chapter 17 for the rules on proper format
for notes and bibliography.**
Bibliography
• Lunsford, Andrea. The St. Martin’s
Handbook. 6th ed. N.Y.: Bedford St.
Martins, 2008. ISBN-13: 9780312443177
– attention to rhetorical choice, language and
style, critical thinking and argument
• Booth, Wayne C., Gregory G. Colomb and
Joseph M. Williams. The Craft of Research.
2nd ed. Univ. of Chicago Press, 2003. ISBN
0226065685.
Bibliography
• Peters, Robert L. Getting what you
came for: the smart student’s guide to
earning a master’s or a Ph.D. Rev. ed.
N.Y.: Noonday Press, 1997. ISBN:
0374524777 [378.24 P442g, 1997]
Citation Indexing
How Does It Work
In the Library
Miss Plum
With the paper cutter
Mr. Brown
Mr. Greene
Dr. Bleau
Dr. Whyte
Citation Indexing
What Does It Do?
Identifies Important Literature
Leads to Primary Resources
Acknowledges “Prior Art”
Data Discovery
YES
Topic
Catalog
Book
Shelf
NO
ILL
Check for Full Text
Index
YES
Article
NO
Full Text
YES
NO
TMC
Journal
NO
Print
Electronic
Check Catalog
Holdings
Find Journals
YES
NO

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