Maidan´s Story - Social Psychology Network

Report
Symbolic Violence in
Cities of Contemporary Ukraine
Preliminary results of
research in Simferopol,
Kyiv, Lviv, Kharkiv
How the chaotic
development of common
public space in the cities
transforms into the street
art.
How the individual acts
of hooliganism evolve
into well planned brutal
provocations.
Photo from downtown
Kharkiv.
Nazi swastika is embedded into F-word in Russian.
Making the combination really unique so far.
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Research Details
The situation in four cities of Ukraine was compared. The expediency for
using graffiti and murals as a weak signal of social tensions in urban
environment was substantiated. The analysis given for several factors that
increase symbolic violence, in particular the mistakes in urban planning and
public space usage.
The sociological concept of
symbolic violence by P.
Bourdieu was used as main
theoretical background; the
practical instruments include
the methods of psychology and
visual anthropology.
Original research methodology
was developed.
The research used three main instruments: graphic images
sample analysis, focus-groups and written survey.
http://top.maidanua.org
Written Survey Results
Hate Speech in Simferopol
Crimean Tatars in
Simferopol agreed
most that graffiti
should be totally
banned.
Photo from
Simferopol. Nazi
swastika over a
portrait of Crimean
Tatar WWII hero.
We have polled two
groups in
Simferopol –
representative
population and
Crimean Tatars only.
Crimean Tatars were deported from their homeland in 1944 due to
alleged cooperation with Nazis. They are returning back home and
tensions with other nationalities exist.
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Written Survey Results
Written Survey Results
Written Survey Results
Written Survey Results
Street… something in Lviv
Street in Lviv
is named
after a
famous
Ukrainian
movie
director of
Armenian
origin (lower
right sign).
For some
reason
people
decided to
add more
labels
directors’
names.
http://maidanua.org
Written Survey Results
Street Art in Kharkiv
People living
in Kharkiv
are most
loyal to
graffiti.
This city also
has lowest
number of
observed
signs of
hatred.
Decaying street portrait of iconic Ukrainian hero – poet Taras
Shevchenko
http://maidanua.org
Written Survey Results
Reaction to Advertising
Most
surveyed
people
everywhere
but in Crimea
consider
graffiti better
than outdoor
advertising;
Photo from
Lviv
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Written Survey Results
Written Survey Results
Written Survey Results
Research Summary
Graffiti and street art not approved by the authorities could be considered a weak
signal of social tensions, that precedes stronger signals as protests or violence.
Common issues for all 4 cities are:
• Underrepresentation of some local groups in local governments.
• Non transparent procedure of distribution of land ownership rights.
• Chaotic city development, absence of professional development plans.
• Chaotic city landscaping, including highly annoying outdoor visual and audio
advertising.
• Political radicals activity.
• Wars of youth subcultures, mostly in symbolic space.
All these common problems should addressed ASAP, otherwise we could expect
degradation of city infrastructure, ecological problems and marginalization of large
social groups.
Local communities should be involved in local governments
more to harmonize the city development.
http://top.maidanua.org
The Beauty or the Beast?
Graffiti wars
were detected
everywhere.
Who will win?
Roses or …?
Photo from
Kharkiv
http://maidanua.org
More Info
Contact Maidan
Viktor Pushkar, Kyiv, Ukraine
Email: [email protected]
Natalka Zubar, Kharkiv, Ukraine
Phone: +380 50 401 23 83
Email: [email protected] Skype: nelliza111
Oleksiy Kuzmenko, Washington, DC
Phone: 202 549 20 68
Email: [email protected] Skype: oleksiykuzmenko
Our site in English http://world.maidanua.org
Our site in Ukrainian http://maidanua.org
Project was made possible due to generous support of the
International Renaissance Foundation with organizational
assistance of the Black Sea Partnership Netowork.
http://top.maidanua.org

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