Chapter 1

Report
Chapter 1
Welcome to the
Restaurant and
Foodservice Industry
© Copyright 2011 by the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF)
and published by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
1.1 Overview of the Restaurant
and Foodservice Industry
Characteristics of the Restaurant and Foodservice Industry:
 Annual sales of over ______________
 Employs more than __________________
 Over ___ percent of restaurant and foodservice managers
are women.
 The industry expects to continue to grow over the next
decade, with _____ million jobs by 2019.
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The Restaurant and
Foodservice Industry
Can be divided into two major parts or segments: commercial and
noncommercial.
1. Commercial segment: ____ percent of the industry.
 Includes:
2. Noncommercial segment: ___ percent of the industry
 purpose:
 Includes:
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The Big Picture: The
Hospitality Industry
U.S. travel and tourism industry averages over 1 trillion dollars
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Travel and tourism:
Hospitality:
Tourism:
Means of traveling have changed over the years:
1800’s, ______________
1920’s, ______________
1950’s, _____________________
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The History of Hospitality
and Foodservice
 The Real Beginning: Ancient Greece and Rome:
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Ancient Greeks rarely dined out, but would have __________.
Phatnai: catered to _______________
Romans’ desires for _______ foods and spices increased trade
Marcus Apicius:
The Middle Ages:
 Changed from a ___________ society to _______ society
 __________ was extremely dangerous.
 Trade with the _______and ______ came to a stop— including
the shipment of spices and fine goods.
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The History of Hospitality
and Foodservice (cont.)
 The Renaissance through the French Revolution:
 Europeans were introduced to coffee from ______ and
coffeehouses or _____ opened in _______.
 Catherine de Medici introduced Haute cuisine:
 Guilds:
• Established ….
 Boulanger: began serving hot soups called ________
(meaning restoratives) for their health-restoring properties. He
called his café a restorante, the origin of our modern word
__________________.
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The History of Hospitality
and Foodservice
 Colonial North America
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As people immigrated to the New World……
As early as 1634….
Very few early-colonial Americans …..
People who did travel…….
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The History of Hospitality
and Foodservice (cont.)
 The Industrial Revolution:
 cottage industries:
 During the Industrial Revolution……..
 _________________establishments opened up to serve the
needs of workers.
 With the invention of the railroad in 1825…………
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The History of Hospitality
and Foodservice (cont.)
 The Gilded Age (Scientific Revolution, Enlightment):
 Advancements in science…….
 when high society dined out, ………………..
 As a result of the California gold rush (1848–
1855…………………………….
 For the thousands of less fortunate individuals, clever
restaurateurs developed the ___________, an assembly-line
process of serving food quickly and cheaply without the need
for servers.
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Chefs in History
 Marie-Antoine Careme:
 Worked for ……………………
 Introduced the art of Grand Cuisine: ………………..
 trained many famous ………………………………………………
Georges Escoffier:
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Refined Careme’s grand sauces into …………………….
Identified ………………………………
Established exact rules of ………………………………
Developed the kitchen brigade system:
……………………………………………….. (ex. aboyeur, or
expeditor takes orders from servers and calls out the orders
to various production areas in kitchen)
The History of Hospitality
and Foodservice (cont.)
 The Twentieth Century:
 By the turn of the century……………………………….
 During World War II in the 1940s……………………...
 After World War II, in the 1940s and
1950s……………………………………………………
 In the 1960s, ………………………. travel became popular,
and builders focused on land near _________ as the next
new place to situate hotels, motels, and foodservice
facilities.
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The History of Hospitality
and Foodservice (cont.)
 The Twentieth Century (continued):
 1970s to today:
 lifestyles have moved steadily toward busier
…………………………………………………………….
 Large restaurant chains lead the way
……………………………………………………………
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Chef of the 20th century
 Fernand Point:…………………………………………………….
 Julia Child:……………………………………………..
 1872, Walter Scott:……………………………………………..
 1921, Ray Allen and Frank Wright: ……………………………….
Chef of the 20th century cont.
 1921, Walter Anderson and E.W. Ingram:
……………………………………………………..
 1954, Ray Kroc and McDonald brothers:
…………………………………………………
 1958, Frank Carney……………………………………
 1966, Norman Brinker: ………………………………
 1977, Ruth Fretel: …………………………………………
1.2 Types of Establishments
Foodservice opportunities within the travel and tourism industry:
 Restaurants
• Multiple restaurants with same name: ______________
• _________________ (buying right to use names of rest.)
• Independent/__________________
 Many customers look to organizations that review establishments
and post ratings to decide where to dine.
 _________________________is a consumer-based guide that rates
restaurants on four qualities: _________________________

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____________________is a rating system best known in Europe.
Restaurants are rated from one to three ___________.
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Types of Establishments (cont.)
 ________________ can be found in catering
departments within hotels, independent catering
companies, and restaurants.
 ____________ foodservice opportunities are found in
businesses that offer home meal replacements and readymade dishes (take out section of grocery store)
 ________________ or sports arenas (corporate suites,
walking vendors, cooks, and cashiers)
 Convention centers: hosts ___________ open to the
public, ______________restricted to those in industry
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Types of Establishments (cont.)
National park system
Theme parks:
Shopping areas: Shopping malls and plazas offer a variety
of foodservice opportunities, including quick-service and
casual-dining restaurants ………………………………
Health-care services:
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Types of Establishments (cont.)
 Schools and universities:
 Foodservice opportunities in the military are greater now than
ever. More than a _________ meals are prepared in military
kitchens each day.
 Correctional facilities:
 Lodging industry……………………………………..
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Career Pathways
Front-of-the-house ……………………………………………….
 Back-of-the-house ………………………………………
 An entry-level job:……………………………………….
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1.3 Why People Travel
 _____________________: relaxation, entertainment,
education, adventure and sport, and social and family events.
 ____________________________: purposes of sales,
negotiations, training, or other types of business related to
their jobs.
 Business travelers ………………………………..
 Business travelers want …………………………….
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Why People Travel (cont.)
To meet the needs of both leisure and business travelers,
tourism is classified according to the type of travel experience
that people desire.
 _______________: observe, learn about, and live
among people whose cultures are different from their
own.
 _______________________: enjoy natural beauty by
hiking, biking, mountain climbing, camping, and
canoeing.
 ____________________: want to swim, lie in the sun,
ski, play golf or tennis, see shows, and so on.
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Types of
Lodging Operations
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Luxury properties:………………………………………….
Full-service properties: ……………………………………………
Mid-priced facilities:……………………………………………….
Economy lodging: …………………………………………..
All-suite properties: …………………………………………….
______________: for vacationers who are looking for recreational
activities and entertainment (Disney)
 _______________________: quaint, quiet accommodations with
simple amenities.
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Ratings Organizations
To distinguish one lodging property from another, several organizations
rate the quality of lodging establishments.
American Automobile Association’s (AAA) Tour Book is
the most widely recognized rating service in the United
States.
 uses a __________________system in judging overall
quality
Mobil Travel Guides: rates lodging by quality of
………………………………………………………..
 Rates by ___________
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Lodging Careers
Careers in the lodging industry are typically divided into
those with customer contact and those that support the
running of the operation.
 Customer contact
positions………………………………………………….
 Behind-the-scenes positions
include………………………………………………………..
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