City of Cape Town IKM Overview SALGA workshop 13 September

Report
Strategic Development
Information & GIS
Information and Knowledge Management
Kevin Tabisher | Manager: Information and Knowledge Strategy
Corporate Services: Strategic Development Information & GIS
Index
1.
Overview of City IKM
2.
DIRC demo
3.
Strategic Information (Research and Statistics)
4.
Corporate GIS
5.
Spatial Viewer demo
6.
Q&A
Strategic Development Information & GIS
Strategic
Development
Information
& GIS
Information &
Knowledge
Strategy
Information
and KM
strategy
Programme for
development
of IKM
within
departments.
Corporate
Strategic
GIS
Information
Spatial data
management/
consultancy/
co-ordination
Town Survey
Marks
GPS Surveys
Aerial
photography
Knowledge
Resources &
Support
Socioeconomic
Needs
Analysis
Knowledge
Resource
Centre
Urban
Indicators
Communicatio
ns & Marketing
Policy
Research
Organisational
Dev
Research
Consultancy
Administration
City’s IKM Development Path
Knowledge Hub
(Integrated Information)
IKM Audit
Knowledge
Management
Framework
+
Implementation
Plan
IKM Policy
(Improving Practices
and Governance)
IKM Partnerships
(Change Management
and building Content)
Better Practices
Risk Management
Legal Compliance
KM KEY AREAS
KM FRAMEWORK
1
2
3
4
5
Data Management
Better Decisionmaking through
Business
Intelligence (BI)
Improving access
to knowledge
assets/
Knowledge reuse
Retaining
Social/Human
Capital
Research and
Innovation
KM INITIATIVES
• Data
Management
Framework
• Spatial Reporting
Tool +ISIS Viewer
• SAP BI
• Knowledge Hub
(City Development
Information
Resource Centre)
• Data Governance
• SAP – GIS
Integration
• IKM Directory
• KM Principles
• Communities of
Practice
• Coaching and
Mentoring
• City Internet Portal
• Expertise Locator
• CHEC
• SACN KM
Reference Group
• DBSA – LGRC/
LGNET
• SharePoint
• Integrated Spatial
Information System
(ISIS)
• Exit interviews
• Linking with
external agencies
• Job shadowing
• CREW
• Spatial Information
Strategy
Departmental/Programme Drivers
Phased IKM Implementation Approach
Year 1 (2011)
Q1
Q2
Q3
Year 2 (2012)
Q4
Q1
Q2
Year 3 (2013)
Q3
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Year 4 (2014)
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Year 5 (2015)
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Phase 1: Enabling IKM Infrastructure
IKM Infrastructure
KNOWLEDGE HUB
(DIRC): supporting projects:
ISIS, Spatial Reporting Tool,
Expertise Locator, IKM (Data)
Directory, Research Hub, Stats,
Info and Trends, IKM Policy
Implement IKM
Partnerships with
lead/priority departments
PARTNERSHIPS:
First Phase: Community
Services; Strategy and
Planning, Utility Services,
Transport
Phase 2: Embedding IKM Culture
Shift focus from
information management
to analysis
SERVICE PROTOCOLS:
IS & T; Communication
Develop Change
Management
Plan/Marketing &
Awareness
Extend IKM Partnerships
to rest of departments
Phase 3: Entrenching IKM Practice
Established Analytical Products
IKM Policy Implementation
IKM Partnerships part of
organisational business processes
AWARENESS:
Via intranet to all Directorates
& Departments
CHANGE MANAGEMENT:
Internal processes &
procedures
Monitoring and Review
Growing and sharing the City’s knowledge base
Users
Knowledge Products
(Information and knowledge being shared
across the City)
SDI & GIS
(corporate)
Knowledge hub/portal – DIRC
(Integrating information and knowledge
corporately)
IKM Partnerships
Departments
(Information and knowledge being
contributed by departments)
The need for a corporate IKM Policy
Information and knowledge
assets reside in individual
departments
Challenges in relation to
departments/directorates
prioritising corporate
integration and sharing of
information
Policy required to ensure
departments share relevant
knowledge across the
organisation
How do we drive IKM corporately?
Content
IKM Partnerships
(Getting departments to
share information)
Mutually beneficial
relationship
Clearly stipulated
requirements or goals
Commitment
IKM Policy
(Improving Practices)
Shared IKM Vision
Clear Partnership Process
Moving from uncoordinated
IKM engagements to more
formally structured
engagements
IKM Needs
(Corporate
&
Departmental)
Strategic Development
Information & GIS
Research and Statistics
Carol Wright| Manager: Strategic Information
Corporate Services: Strategic Development Information & GIS
Purpose
Research:
Share information on City of Cape Town Research
Management Policy and the Research Hub
Research Management Policy Framework and Guidelines
Statistics:
Share some information on approach, use and examples
of how statistics, in particular those from Statistics South
Africa data have been analysed and used to inform
decision-making and planning in CCT.
Research
Research Presentation Overview
Importance of research
Role of SDI & GIS
City of Cape Town Corporate
Research Management Policy
Framework and Guidelines
Research Management Tools
The importance of research
Knowledge is a key driver of an organisation’s
effectiveness and a strategic input to
decision-making
Research efforts in CCT may include :
Urban development research, M&E research,
customer satisfaction research, service level research,
feasibility studies (including for large infrastructure projects),
(urban issue related) modelling research, value chain analysis
It is imperative that the City’s efforts directed at
knowledge generation and value addition to information
(strategic & forward planning) form part of a coherent and
coordinated research and management framework.
Role of SDI & GIS
The Department has a role at a corporate level to:
Support the City’s research activities on urban developmental matters through combination of research facilitation activities (e.g.
installing/managing corporate research tenders) and providing research
advice
Provide a coherent overview of strategic knowledge which the City
requires and acquires to take decisions and function effectively
Drive implementation of the CCT Research Management Policy
Framework and Guidelines(CCT, 26 April 2011).
Provide the related guidelines and tools to line departments that allow
them to improve the quality of, drive any research projects originating
from within their department, and share the research outputs at different
points along the research process.
Figure 1: City of Cape Town Research Management Framework
City Strategic
Imperatives
 City Development
Strategy
 Integrated
Development Plan
 Spatial Development
Framework
 Economic
Development
Strategy
 Transport Plan
 Others...
Service Delivery/
Operational
problem focussed
knowledge needs
Strategic
knowledge
needs
Strategic
Information
Department
Line
Departments
SPECIFIC
RESEARCH
PLAN
IMPLEMENT
RESEARCH
KNOWLEDGE
HUB
 Triggering of research
tracker
 Standard research
guidelines
 Research guidelines
 Possible triggering of
City Research
Working Group
Re
City of Cape Town, 26 April 2011)
Corporate Research Management
Policy Framework and Guidelines
The intention of the Policy is to allow for the better
management, co-ordination, storage, access and
utilisation of research by all in the organization.
To promote easy access to and sharing of research
information and outcomes
To avoid duplication of research
To improve the quality of important research and avoid
basic errors
To increase capacity for conducting research at all levels
throughout the City by providing guidelines for every step
of the research process
Research management tools
City Research Working Group (CREW) –
inter-directorate structure – to identify and advise on
strategic research needs and operationalise research
policy implementation
Research Hub – part of DIRC, an online platform for sharing
planned completed research – and the tools for sharing that
– using the research initiation form (RIF), and (shared)
metadata
Online tools for tracking current research
Gather inputs to formulate a forward-focussed research plan
Corporate tender – urban development research
Challenges
Use of research: research problem – research recommendations – action
Research capacity in line departments
Sharing research (especially completed research)
Scoping and definition of research
Managing research service providers
Opportunities
Strengthen the link between research problem to
action/use
Build capacity
Have a single access point to all City research
Guidelines for scoping research
Defining research services and standards
Improve the quality of research
Statistics
Statistics Presentation Overview
Key dimensions of evidence-based
statistics
Broad approach
Importance and use of statistical data
Policy and planning context and alignment
Use of Stats SA data analysis – range of
examples
Evidence based decision-making: challenges &
opportunities
Broad Approach
Data to Information to Knowledge to Action to Outcomes
Technical
Rigour
Monitoring &
feedback
Evidence
base
Policy
relevant
Better
development
results
Better
policies
Enhanced
decisionmaking
(Adapted from Data UNity Network, 2011, http://www.unescap.org/stat/data-unity/Data-UNity-Network-Presentation-EGM-Oct2011.pdf)
Key Dimensions of Evidenced based
Statistics
Institutional Environment
The institutional and organisational factors which may impact on the
effectiveness and credibility of the agency producing the statistics
Relevance
The degree to which information meets the needs of users.
Timeliness
The delay between the reference period and the release of the information.
Accuracy
The degree to which the information correctly describes the phenomena being measured.
Coherence
The degree to which the information can be brought together with other information, and over time.
Interpretability
The availability of supplementary information necessary to interpret the statistical information.
Accessibility
The ease with which the information can be obtained
(Australian Statistics Bureau, http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/lookup/1500.0chapter32010)
Importance & use of statistical data
Reliable urban development analysis and
understanding depends on good and current data.
Currently this is one of the major challenges for cities in South
Africa.
It is important for the City of Cape Town as a municipality to use
official STATS SA data:
- to align with the official public sector source
- to provide a reference and basis for continuity
The City’s corporate approach is for all City Departments to use a
consistent set of demographic, socio-economic and other figures.
Importance & use of statistical data
Key inputs to:
Policy making, decision making and monitoring :
- City Development Strategy; Economic Growth Strategy;
Social Development Strategy; Spatial Development Framework
5 year IDP 2012-2017
Planning – long, medium and short term: strategic, operational, management
- Growth Management Strategy
5 year Housing Plan
Water Demand Plan
Service delivery
- water, electricity, sanitation, waste management; transport; human
settlements, health, community services, transport, broad band network
Financial planning and management
- Equitable share, MTREF
Operations and management
- asset management plan
Policy –
Planning
context &
alignment
 National
 Provincial
 Local
City of Cape Town – 2011 Census – Cape Town
December 2012
Compiled by Strategic Development Information and GIS Department, City of Cape Town
2011 and 2001 Census data supplied by Statistics South Africa
(Based on information available at the time of compilation as released by Statistics South Africa)
Demographic Profile, Economic Profile, Household Services Profile
Use of
Stats SA
Data
&
Analysis
Cape Town Overview – 2011 Census
Cape Town
2001
2011
Population
Households
Average Household Size
2 892 243
777 389
3.72
3 740 025
1 068 572
3.50
Change 2001 to 2011
Number
%
847 782
29.3%
291 183
37.5%
In 2011 the population of Cape Town was 3 740 025, an increase of 29.3% since 2001, and the number of
households was 1 068 572, an increase of 37.5% since 2001. The average household size has declined
from 3.72 to 3.50 in the 10 years.
A household is defined as a group of persons who live together, and provide themselves jointly with food or
other essentials for living, or a single person who lives alone (Statistics South Africa).
The population and household numbers above are to be used and quoted as the official numbers for Cape
Town for 2011.
Key results for Cape Town:
Census
2011

The population is predominantly Coloured (42%) and Black African (39%).

46% of those aged 20 years and older have completed Grade 12 or higher.

76% of the labour force (aged 15 to 64) is employed.

47% of households earn R3 200 or less a month.

78% of households live in formal dwellings.

87% of households have access to piped water in their dwelling or inside their yard.

88% of households have access to a flush toilet connected to the public sewer system.

94% of households have their refuse removed at least once a week.

94% of households use electricity for lighting in their dwelling.
Note: There are small variations in the total population and the number of households in the profile tables
which follow. These occur as Statistics South Africa had to calculate the true population to correct
omissions and double counts in the enumeration process. These variations are not significant.
Go to top of document
City of Cape Town – 2011 Census – Ward 001
January 2013
Compiled by Strategic Development Information and GIS Department, City of Cape Town
2011 and 2001 Census data supplied by Statistics South Africa
(Based on information available at the time of compilation as released by Statistics South Africa)
Ward Overview, Demographic Profile, Economic Profile, Household Services Profile
Ward Description
Ward 001 includes the areas of De Duin, Glenwood, Kaapzicht, Kleinbosch, Monte Vista, N1 City,
Panorama, Plattekloof, Plattekloof Glen, Sonnendal, Tygerdal and Welgelegen
Cape Town – Census 2011
Population Change
•
In 2011 the population of Cape Town was 3 740 025, an increase of 29.3% since 2001.
•
In period 1996 – 2011 (15 years), the:
- population of Cape Town has increased 46%
- composition of the population has changed e.g. Black African population increased 124 %
•
Cape Town 2011 population is in line with previous City estimates
Cape Town – Census 2011:
– Age Trends
1996
2001
2011
60%
51.3%
48.4%
46.7%
50%
40%
30%
18.8%17.9%
14.9%
20%
10%
19.0% 20.0% 18.4%
9.4% 8.7% 9.9%
5.0% 5.0% 5.5%
0%
0 to 4 years
•
•
•
•
•
•
5 to 14 years
15 to 24 years
25 to 64 years
65 years and older
57% of Cape Town’s population is over 25 years
18% are between 15 - 24 years, 10% are 4 years or younger
2011 median age of the population in Cape Town is 28 years
Proportion in the 5 - 24 years age groups declining
Young Black African and Coloured age cohorts
Older White and Asian age cohorts. The population is starting to age, in particular White
population group
Cape Town – Census 2011
Services data - Sanitation
Flush toilet (connected to sewerage system)
Flush toilet (with septic tank)
Chemical toilet
Pit toilet with ventilation (VIP)
Pit toilet without ventilation
Bucket toilet
Other
None
100%
1.8%
2001
Flush toilet (connected
to sewerage system)
Flush toilet (with septic
tank)
Chemical toilet
Pit toilet with
ventilation
Pit toilet without
ventilation
Bucket toilet
Other
None
Total
2.7%
4.9%
97.7%
85%
94.7%
2.5%
75%
Black African
Coloured
Asian
Note: Population Group is that of the Head of Household
White
Other
Total
1.2%
0.3%
0.2%
0.6%
0.2%
4.4%
4.5%
1.0%
2.7%
7.2%
100.0% 100.0%
3% of households
have no toilet
(decrease from 7%
in 2001)
3.2%
78.2%
0.2%
•
88.2%
80%
2.0%
4.5% of households
have access to a
bucket toilet.
98.5%
93.2%
2.0%
•
1.2%
2.0%
8.9%
88.2%
88% of households
have access to a
flush toilet
connected to the
public sewer system
(78% of Black
African households)
4.5%
90%
85.3%
•
2.3%
95%
2011
Census 2011: Socio- economic Index Cape Town (Wards)
Overall
Index and
weighting:
• Household
Services:
30%
• Education:
20%
• Housing:
20%
• Economic:
30%
Concentration
of need in
Metro South
East
• Khayelitsha
• Mitchells
Plain
• South East
Very Needy
Needy
Average
Census 2011:Metro South East
(Wards)
Index and weighting:
•
Household Services: 30%
•
Education: 20%
•
Housing: 20%
•
Economic: 30%
Census – Community Profiles: Libraries and
Information (based on 2001 Census data)
Community profiles of the area
that falls within 3 km of each
library as part of the “know
your community project”
General Household Surveys
Black African
Coloured
White
Total
90%
80%
2011
79.4%
70%
60%
Black
African
Coloured
White
Total
67.4%
72.8%
77.7%
71.0%
31.8%
26.7%
22.3%
28.5%
0.8%
0.4%
0.0%
0.5%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
Yes
54.8%
50.4%
53.5%
50%
No
40%
27.4%
26.0%
30%
26.4%
18.3%
20%
14.2%
10.9%
10%
12.3%
8.3%8.1%
7.8%
Do not
know
2.2%
0%
1 Grant
2 Grants
3 Grants
Over 3 Grants
Number of social grants per household
Total
The number of social grants
received per household by
population group of household head
in Cape Town in 2011
Exposure of children in
Cape Town under 5 years
to ECD programmes in
2011 by population group
(Source: 2011 General Household Survey Data,
Statistics SA)
(Source: 2011 General Household
Survey Data, Statistics SA)
General Household Surveys
2009
1010
2011
40%
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
Office is at
home
Walking
Bicycle
Minibus taxi
/motorcycle /sedan taxi
Bus
Mode of transport used to
commute to work in Cape
Town for 2009, 2010 and 2011
(Source: 2009, 2010 and 2011 General
Household Survey Data, Statistics SA)
Train
Lift club
using a
private
vehicle
Private
/company
vehicle
Unspecified
Quarterly Labour Force Surveys
Analysis of Q2 2008-2012
City of Cape Town – Access
• Access to data, information and knowledge is critical
• Data awareness
• Data quality
• Fit for purpose
• Need to bring data providers and data users together
• Provide client focused data and information
• Good track record: in 2009 the City of Cape Town was the proud
overall winner in the "Dissemination" category in the Statistics South
Africa Awards for Excellence.
Evidence based decision-making:
Challenges
Limited city/municipality level – local area data
Census takes place every 10 years
Need for more disaggregated data and at various spatial
levels
Need for integrated datasets
Need for coherence across various data sources
Statistical literacy to understand and interpret data correctly
Expectation of users to be able to manipulate data by
themselves
Evidence base decision-making:
Opportunities
Firm foundation, commitment, capacity and mix of skills to
produce quality information
Partnerships and collaboration
Need to become “knowledge builders”
Need to become “communicators” and “educators”
Need to maintain relevance and impartiality in light of the
changing context
In future:
- explore the use of social media for access and inclusion of
information from public
- open data
Closure
The City recognises the importance of
valid and quality information in the urban
development process.
Need to continue to improve and further develop
evidence based information and make it
accessible, in order to support well informed
decisions and planning for policies, programmes
and projects.
ENKOSI
DANKIE
THANK YOU
Strategic Development
Information & GIS
Corporate GIS
Stefan Steenekamp | Principal GIS Analyst
Corporate Services: Strategic Development Information & GIS
Index
1.
Priority Areas within Corporate GIS
2.
Corporate GIS Vision
3.
Spatial Information Portal
4.
Questions
Spatial Information Strategy
Goals: 2008
Spatial information that is reliable, trusted and
interoperable
Strengthen the integrated, enterprise-wide management of
spatial information to ensure sharing
Effective dissemination to ensure accessibility & use
Effective governance model to ensure co-operation and
coordination
Effective support via human resource and technology
infrastructure
Priority areas within Corporate GIS
Approved Spatial Information Strategy & Policy
1
4
2
Enterprise wide Spatial Information Management
3
Implementation of a Spatial Information Portal
GIS/Spatial Data Governance & Partnerships
Corporate GIS: Vision
Professional GIS
Publish
GIS for
Everyone
Spatial Information Portal (live demo)
News/Discussions
Interactive Maps
Static Maps
Data Directory
Projects
Policy & Standards
Business Viewers
Conclusion (CGIS)
We aim to move GIS forward in a coordinated way
We want everyone to be able to use GIS
Inform decision making by using GIS
Phased IKM Implementation Approach
Year 1 (2011)
Q1
Q2
Q3
Year 2 (2012)
Q4
Q1
Q2
Year 3 (2013)
Q3
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Year 4 (2014)
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Year 5 (2015)
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Phase 1: Enabling IKM Infrastructure
IKM Infrastructure
KNOWLEDGE HUB
(DIRC): supporting projects:
ISIS, Spatial Reporting Tool,
Expertise Locator, IKM (Data)
Directory, Research Hub, Stats,
Info and Trends, IKM Policy
Implement IKM
Partnerships with
lead/priority departments
PARTNERSHIPS:
First Phase: Community
Services; Strategy and
Planning, Utility Services,
Transport
Phase 2: Embedding IKM Culture
Shift focus from
information management
to analysis
SERVICE PROTOCOLS:
IS & T; Communication
Develop Change
Management
Plan/Marketing &
Awareness
Extend IKM Partnerships
to rest of departments
Phase 3: Entrenching IKM Practice
Established Analytical Products
IKM Policy Implementation
IKM Partnerships part of
organisational business processes
AWARENESS:
Via intranet to all Directorates
& Departments
CHANGE MANAGEMENT:
Internal processes &
procedures
Monitoring and Review
Next Phases of IKM Implementation
Year 1 (2011)
Q1
Q2
Q3
Year 2 (2012)
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Year 3 (2013)
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Year 4 (2014)
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Year 5 (2015)
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Phase 1: Enabling IKM Infrastructure
•
•
Enhance content
Enhance Knowledge
Tools:
 Spatial Information

•
•
and Mapping Portal
(SIMP)
Stats, Trends and
Indicators
Add functionality
Develop outward-facing
version of DIRC
Phase 2: Embedding IKM Culture
•
•
•
•
•
IKM Policy rollout
Address analysis
capacity
Extend IKM
Partnerships
Accelerate uptake and
growth of DIRC
Build corporate strategic
information platform
Phase 3: Entrenching IKM Practice
•
•
•
•
Provide established analytical
products
Provide self-service to strategic
information
Information and Knowledge
Management an SDBIP
requirement
Monitoring and review
Q4
City of Cape Town IKM Overview
Year 1 (2011)
Q1
Q2
Q3
Year 2 (2012)
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Year 3 (2013)
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q&A
Year 4 (2014)
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Year 5 (2015)
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4

similar documents