Dwaine Duckett, Randy Scott and Donna Salvo

Report
Dwaine Duckett
Vice President
Human Resources
Talent Management
Strategy and Future
University of California
Human Resources
Randy Scott
Executive Director
Talent Management
Donna Salvo
Director
Talent Acquisition and
Staffing Programs
April 16, 2012
Santa Barbara,1 CA
Agenda
HR Strategy – Focus on Talent Management
Talent Acquisition
Talent Development
Career Tracks / Career Paths
2
HR Strategy
Today’s focus
Talent Management
Dwaine Duckett
Vice President
Human Resources
University of California
Human Resources
3
Vision
Strategy
Tactics
Transaction
Reaction
Something
happens we have to
fix
External influence
drives action
Crisis
management
Timing:
NOW
Set of steps
triggered by an
occurrence
Dominated by
rules and
standards
Typically one
right answer
Timing:
Completed
in 2-3 days
Target set
Road map to
achieve it in place at
start
Road map may
contain
contingencies that
don’t require
consultation
Multiple targets
or initiatives
Involves a series
of aligned tactics
Incorporates the
movements of
multiple
units/functions
Usually
incorporates one
unit
Timing:
One month
to 2 quarters
Timing:
One year or more
“The headline”
The ideal Future
State
Incorporates
operating
environments,
philosophy and way
of doing business
Takes into
account external
perception of an
entity
Timing:
Is probably never
fully realized in all
aspects
“Regenerating
Improvement”
4
Employee Relations and Policies Strategic Plan
Strategic Themes: Operate as an excellent employer
Mission: Build an environment of employee engagement, empowerment and involvement where people
can offer their best; equip managers with tools, resources and a policy framework that facilitates an
effective operating environment
STRATEGIES
SO THAT…
FUTURE IMPLICATIONS





Reorganize the functions,
distinguishing ER from LR
Increase interface with nonrepresented groups
Have overall ER strategies lead
Labor strategies



We continually improve our
reputation with all employees
Increase employee engagement
and satisfaction
Tap into the desire to drive
productivity via discretionary
effort
Acknowledge non represented as
a key constituency


Sets the environment to attract
and retain the best
Maintain a degree of operational
flexibility via the non represented
population
Drives productivity by increasing
satisfaction and engagement
5
Labor Relations Strategic Plan
Strategic Themes: The contract is central to how we operate
Mission: Constantly engage unions and locations to foster a stable, predictable, compliant Labor
Relations environment
STRATEGIES
SO THAT…
FUTURE IMPLICATIONS






Advance a “constructive
engagement” doctrine
Leverage UC as large employer
with multiple unions
Commit to timely settlements
Acknowledge “closed contract” as
a preferred state


We collaborate and deal on the
basis of “mutual interests” where
possible
We don’t allow lingering issues to
create feelings of bad faith
We stabilize our operating
environment



Labor peace and stability
whenever possible
Focus on operational contract
terms vs. just wages and benefits
Minimization of external
influences on UC
Evaluate feasibility of interestbased bargaining
6
Compensation Programs & Strategy Strategic Plan
Strategic Themes: Move toward aligning with markets (particularly total cash); leverage all aspects of
remuneration
Mission: Development of compensation/rewards framework and position evaluation methodology that
account for relative level of contribution and emphasize pay for performance
STRATEGIES
SO THAT…
FUTURE IMPLICATIONS







Emphasize Market-Based
practices
Take a systemwide view of
practices
Derive common frameworks for
position evaluation and
performance management
Gain efficiencies in reporting and
compliance via HRIS
Understand the role of cash
compensation



We lay the foundation to adjust
pay practices to our relevant
markets
We drive consistency of practices,
set appropriate review and
monitoring systems
Provide timely accurate data and
transactions to the President and
The Regents
We balance all other types of
rewards within a total package



Moving toward market alignment
allows us to make competitive
talent choices
Logical implementation of pay
practices will drive internal
credibility to help us attract and
retain talent
Moving to more proactive
approaches to compensation
(industry standards)
A sustained excellent workforce
and university
7
Benefits Programs & Strategies Strategic Plan
Strategic Themes: Align programs to markets, leverage our size and emphasize employee value
Mission: Manage and create a health benefits strategy and programs that enhance the well-being of our
employees and their families
STRATEGIES
SO THAT…
FUTURE IMPLICATIONS






Control costs and create value for
employees through plan design
Focus on giving employees
choices and alternatives
Leverage UC’s Medical enterprise
as subject matter expert and
provider


We establish programs that are
market competitive and
sustainable
Acknowledge differences in
employee’s value equations and
move from “one size” mentality
We more effectively leverage UC
medical expertise

Stabilization of cost curve
Emphasize employee
responsibility in a less
paternalistic culture
Possibility of expanding UC Med
as a primary service provider
could have cost and employee
relations affiliation benefits
8
Pension & Retirement Programs Strategic Plan
Strategic Themes: Leverage value of Defined Benefit architecture and Retiree Health program
Mission: Manage and create programs that reward long service and help provide for post-employment
income and healthcare
STRATEGIES
SO THAT…
FUTURE IMPLICATIONS





Use PEB recommendations as our
guide to sustainable offerings
View all retirement plans and
retiree health as integrated parts
of the employee / talent lifecycle
Balance programs with market
practices


We offer continued value to the
UC population
Move forward with more
balanced programming
Drive workforce behavior that
builds on UC’s premier status as
an institution

A workforce that reflects
institutional priorities
Leverage our Post Employment
Benefits as a strategic talent
advantage
9
Retirement Administration Service Center Strategic Plan
Strategic Themes: Use technology to expand the RASC service concept
Mission: Build a state-of-the-art retirement processing center and service experience that helps
employees transition to the next phase of their lives
STRATEGIES
SO THAT…
FUTURE IMPLICATIONS




Build newly insourced center,
with Service and Technology as
primary points of emphasis
Look to extend the RASC
continuous learning and service
concept

We maintain the smooth
operation of this valued set of
programs
We extend UC best practices to
other employee service areas
Consider if this concept can be
scaled for other transactional
work
10
HR Systems & Data Strategic Plan
Strategic Themes: Use relevant data to drive Human Resource decision making
Mission: Gather, track and report on relevant metrics that influence decisions on Human Capital
STRATEGIES
SO THAT…
FUTURE IMPLICATIONS




Explore browser-based systems
and feasibility of using some
common systems across UC
Work with Senior Management to
develop Human Capital metrics

We take advantage of efficiencies
gained through systems and
collaboration
We use readily accessible data to
manage the enterprise
We leverage our vast human
capital more effectively
11
Talent Management & Staff Development Strategic Plan
Strategic Themes: Programs to better manage Human Capital, the University’s primary asset
Mission: Design an approach, strategies and programs to hire, deploy, develop and retain the best people
in their respective fields
STRATEGIES
SO THAT…
FUTURE IMPLICATIONS






Resource this area, not just on
paper
Inject Talent discussions into all
aspects of HR programs
Evaluate support systems and
current practices to support the
mission
Leverage our talent pool of all
180,000 employees


We create an environment where
organizational opportunity
meets readiness of individuals
We improve our status as a
preferred employer
We develop the best leaders and
subject matter experts and
provide advancement
opportunities for both


Prepare for a more dynamic post
recession job market
Establish bench strength in key
functions
We have backup and succession
plans for key positions (consider
organization-wide succession
planning)
12
Talent Acquisition
Donna Salvo
Director
Talent Acquisition and
Staffing Programs
University of California
Human Resources
13
Fully loaded unemployment in the US has been as high as 16 percent,
yet job openings for critical roles remain unfilled for months at a time.
Market trend is showing “time-to-fill” has actually been going up
More traditional uses of outside talent are also increasing dramatically.
The use of contingent workers is way up and will increase even more in
the future. In fact, 35 percent of employers plan to increase their use of
contingent workers by 50 percent or more
Despite high unemployment, there are persistent shortages in key roles.
Showing an increasing pace of change for both technology and business.
In your roles: Plan for these sorts of challenges and focus particular
attention on talent mobility strategies, rapid reskilling, and strategic hiring
practices aimed at tapping into talent surpluses in one geography to offset
talent gaps in another.
14
Workers staying longer - Not surprisingly, given this increase in health,
some workers are choosing to work into their retirement years
For UC critical mass reaching retirement age in next 5 years
The future workforce will require technical skills for many job levels and
categories of work.
With soaring IT employment, finding skilled workers could present a
serious challenge. The need for IT professionals across all industries is
evident by the fact that related jobs in the U.S. increased by 13,300 in
January, to more than 4.1 million technology jobs, an all-time high.
Greater diversity in the workforce- Gen Y is used to getting information
from social networking sites while their older counterparts are more
comfortable working within email.
15
Consider developing a social recruiting strategy
Extend your campus employment brand by building websites and career
pages that attract the kind of Talent UC is looking for.
Prepare for talent shortage – by 2016 there will be 5 retirees for every
one new job entrant, build development programs to provide training and
advancement within the organization.
Today’s tools:
UC Systemwide job board
LinkedIn recruiting and sourcing tools
Customized career pages with links to UC on LinkedIn
Systemwide contracts with job boards (i.e. Careerbuilder, America’s job
bank, Indeed)
Executive Search firms agreements
Contingent Search firm agreements in specialty areas… (IT and Finance)
16
People are using it….
Systemwide job board launched December 15, 2011
 Hits from 12-15-11 to 3-16-12
303,821
 Average monthly hits
98,000-102,000
17
Top Ten Referring Sources
direct entry
universityofcalifornia.edu
google.com
ucop.edu
Top ten web sites that job
seekers were on before
clicking on the link to reach
the Systemwide Job Search
atyourservice.ucop.edu
ucdavis.edu
jobs.ucsd.edu
www1.ucsc.edu
hr.ucdavis.edu
map.ais.ucla.edu
-
5,000
10,000
15,000
20,000
25,000
30,000
35,000
40,000
45,000
18
Search for Jobs Through Systemwide Job Board
Berkeley
Davis
San Francisco
Office of the President
Los Angeles
San Diego
Irvine
Davis Medical Center
San Francisco Medical Center
How job seekers searched
for jobs on the Systemwide
Job Search Board
Santa Cruz
Santa Barbara
Los Angeles Medical Center
Riverside
Irvine Medical Center
San Diego Medical Center
Merced
selectall
-
10,000
20,000
30,000
40,000
50,000
60,000
70,000
80,000
90,000
100,000
19
20
21
22
Talent Development UC Management
Development Program
Randy Scott, SPHR
Executive Director
Talent Management and
Staff Development
University of California
Human Resources
23
The Purpose of the Management Development Program
is build and strengthen Manager capability in these UC Core Competencies:
People Management
Employee Engagement
Change Management
So That…..
Managers accomplish the UC mission by leading and engaging staff in the
attainment of strategic and operational goals which enhance individual
accomplishment and reinforce organizational excellence.
24
 Middle-level Managers of complex programs,
or projects
•not front line supervisor or senior/executive leaders
 These Managers can be any of the following roles:
 Supervisors of Leads or Supervisors
 Managers of Managers
 Leaders of a division or functional area
 Leaders of complex operational programs or
projects that are university-wide or across
location departments or divisions
25
MDP Module I People Management
The Manager Redefined Model
High-performing organizations have Managers who excel in five categories:
Executing
Tasks
Developing
People
Delivering
the Deal
Energizing
Change
Authenticity and Trust
Source: Towers Watson:
Manager Redefined: The Competitive Advantage in the Middle of Your Organization,
Jossey-Bass, A Wiley Imprint, 2010
26
MDP Module II Employee Engagement
um
im
ax
M
n
it o
c
a
f
tis The Engaged
a
S
The
Almost
Engaged
Honeymooners
& Hamsters
n
io
ut
rib
nt
Co
um
im
ax
M
The
The
Crash & Burners
The
Disengaged
BlessingWhite X Engagement Model
27
MDP Module III Change Management
DDI Change Management Model
28
MDP Module III Change Management
29
To be held in Northern and Southern California with same agenda and learning
outcomes
 ESTABLISH MANAGER NETWORKS
 EXPOSURE TO UC SYSTEMWIDE INITIATIVES AND PRIORITIES
 APPLICATION OF LEARNED CORE COMPETENCIES
 Regional Conference is intended to attain the same recognition and cache as
Business Officer Institute (BOI)
 Program completion is expected to be a milestone in a Manager’s professional
development
30
Career Tracks
Career Paths and Market Analysis for
PSS and MSP Jobs
Dwaine Duckett
Vice President
Human Resources
University of California
Human Resources
31
Risks Associated With Current Practices
Proposed Approach
Project Scope
Goals and Benefits
Career Level Structure
Career Path & Progression
32
Job categories for professional and managerial employees are
misaligned with the market and are poorly defined
 Inconsistent practices and misclassifying employees present
significant labor and legal risk
Some locations have an internal rather than external market
orientation.
Generic job titles, such as Analyst, Specialist, or Manager make it
difficult to compare market information.
Current salary structures are not market-aligned
Job categories and career paths within UC are inconsistent / not well
defined
Prominent among various risk factors are classification and
reclassification issues
33
Create multiple levels for Individual Contributor, Supervisory and
Management for each distinct functional area
Establish consistent leveling criteria to align with the market
Define specific job duties to further refine the leveling criteria within
each functional area
34
Scope
The scope for this implementation is MSP and PSS jobs. The systemwide effort will be managed according to a parallel plan, working closely
with the campuses and medical centers
What’s not changing?
Employee pay will not be immediately affected, although new
classification system will provide better foundation for determining
placement
Key responsibilities will not change as a result of mapping to new
structure, although updated descriptions will provide better foundation
for performance and career management
35
Ultimately, the goal is to:
Implement a system wide series of job classifications
Align each job to their respective labor market
Provide a job structure that provides management tools to motivate/retain
staff, acknowledging contribution, growth, performance
Remove real or perceived barriers to move from PSS to MSP
Understand how many staff are performing each job function/level
Benefits of system-wide job categories and career paths:
Simplified administration (process and systems)
Readily accessible position-to-market and cost of labor data
Fair and equitable
Reduced risk
Payroll titles aligned in payroll and HRIS (6,000 titles currently in use)
36
Non Supervisory/Professional/Technical Track
37
Manager III
Manager II
Manager I
Expert
Supervisor II
Advanced
Supervisor I
Experienced
Intermediate
Entry
Supervisory/Managerial/Leadership Track
Manager IV
Professional
Supervisory/Managerial
Entry
Supervisor I
Intermediate
Supervisor II
Experienced
Manager I
Advanced
Manager II
Expert
Manager III
Manager IV
38
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