ArochoHayes_MOSL_Presentation_Principals_CFN_Meeting_8

Report
Agenda
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
MOSL/ADVANCE Deadlines and Overview
Baseline assessments and Growth Measures
MOSL Quiz
NYC Performance Assessments -Overview
NYC Performance Assessments – Tools for Norming
with Staff.
CFN 536 – Gerard Beirne, Network Leader
Center for Education Innovation – Public Education Association
Facilitators: Antonio Arocho and Niobe Hayes
August
September
October
November
MOSL Menu
Interactive Tool
released.
Committees
recommend Local
Measure. Principal
approves (or
chooses default).
(9/9)
Schools submit
baseline
assessment data
(optional–for
inclusion in DOE
targets).(10/31)
(deadline is 10/4
for inclusion in
DOE targets)
DOE targets for
individual student
goal-setting
released (goalsetting
only).(11/15)
Advance Web
Application 1.0
released.
Sample NYC
Performance
Assessments
available.
Continued MOSL
training webinars
and resources.
Principals select
State Measure
(where the option
exists).
Teachers
administer and
score baseline
assessments.
See: ADVANCE TOOLS and TIMELINES
Goals finalized
(goal-setting
only).
MOSL Scoring Requirements


In accordance with state teacher evaluation law,
teachers may not score their own end-of-year
assessments.
Schools may opt to either:


Have another teacher in the school score both baseline
and end-of-year assessments for consistency.
Have the classroom teacher score the baseline and
another teacher in the school score the end-of-year
assessment.
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Note that teachers who teach
less than 40% are rated S or U—
but still subject to Danielson
rubric
Look at page 5 of your FAQ
Where choices exist, schools may opt to use a
DOE-recommended baseline assessment or a
school-selected baseline.
•
Remember:
 Baselines only need to be selected for a few state
assessments and AP exams.* All other 3rd party and
Performance Assessments come with baseline assessments.
 Where baselines must be selected, the PRINCIPAL chooses.
 If the selected baseline is not on the DOE list, schools must
use goal-setting. DOE targets provided to those schools will
not include results from the baseline.
* Principals also have the option of selecting an alternative baseline assessment for Discovery
Math in K only.
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The following assessments have required baselines:
Assessment
Baseline
All NYC Performance Assessments NYC Performance Assessment
(fall administration)
Performance Series
Performance Series
(fall administration)
State Assessments: grades 4-8
ELA and Math
ELA/Math Assessment (prior
year)
Discovery Math 1st and 2nd Grade
Discovery Math (fall
administration)
Look at page 9 of your FAQ
Assessment
Baseline Choices
Discovery Math: Kindergarten (in K-2 schools only)
1. Discovery math (fall administration)
2. School-selected baseline
Advanced Placement (AP) Exams
1. PSAT(state assessment 8th grade if not available)
2. School-selected baseline (should be selected by schools
if they want to use goal setting, since PSAT fall
administration results will not be available until
November 15 goal-setting deadline)
State Assessments: 3rd Grade ELA and Math
1. NYC 3rd Grade ELA/Math Performance Assessment (fall
administration)
2. School-selected baseline
State Assessments: 4th Grade Science
1. NYC 4th Grade Science performance Assessment (fall
administration)
2. State assessments: 3rd Grade Math (prior year)
3. School-selected baseline
State Assessments: 8th Grade science
1. NYC 8th Grade Science Performance Assessment (fall
administration)
2. State Assessments: 7th grade Math (prior year)
3. School-selected baseline
State Regent Exams
1. PSAT (State Assessment:8th Grade if PSAT not available.
State Assessment: 7th Grade if Regents administered in
8th Grade.)
2. School-selected baseline
NYSESLAT
1. NYSESLAT (prior year) (Lab-R if prior year NYSESLAT not
available)
2. School-selected baseline
NYSAA
1. NYSAA prior year and SANDI if prior year NYSAA not
available.
2. School-selected baseline
After choosing assessments and target populations, committees must
select one of two growth measurements for each assessment.
Growth Models: DOE calculates student targets, results,
and teacher scores. Results are shared after assessments
have been administered so student growth can be
compared to similar students’ performance on
assessments.
Goal-Setting: DOE provides targets for how students will
perform on assessments that principals and teachers can
adjust based on their knowledge of students. Principals
approve targets.
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
•
Growth models allow us to compare the progress that students make in
a year to similar students.
In the State Growth Model, similar students are defined by four studentlevel characteristics at the student and classroom levels:




•
Academic history
Economic disadvantage
Disability status
Language learner status
Citywide models account for similar characteristics to the State model.
Growth
models control for the degree to which students are expected to
make gains given their achievement history and demographic
characteristics.
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•
Does not introduce additional
work in schools.
•
Enables schools to compare
their students’ performance to
similar students.
•
Gives teachers credit for the
degree to which students
exceed predicted growth.
•
Better able to account for
unexpected outcomes resulting
from unfamiliar, new
assessments.
•
Growth model score results are
not available until after
assessments have been
administered (i.e., the
following spring/summer).
Challenges
Benefits
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1.
Administer baseline
assessment
Baseline assessment administered (not required for all
assessments).
Report baseline assessment results.
2.
DOE sends predicted DOE sends predictions for how individual students will perform.
student targets
Predictions are based on baseline performance, student
achievement history, and student demographic characteristics.
3.
Teachers review DOE- Teachers may choose to adjust these targets based on additional
predicted targets
information about their students.
Teachers submit student targets to principal.
4.
5.
6.
Principals approve or
adjust targets
Administer end of year
assessment
Teachers’ Ratings
Principal (or designee) reports finalized student targets.
End-of-year assessment administered to students.
Teachers’ HEDI ratings are calculated with a conversion
chart based on students’ performance on outcome
assessments relative to their targets.
•
•
Requires additional
time/resources.
•
Teacher’s rating is based on the
percentage of students who
meet their target, but does not
consider the degree to which
students fall below or exceed
their target.
•
Targets must be set early in the
school year, possibly before
much diagnostic info is
gathered
•
Setting goals may be
challenging if:
• Teachers are not familiar
with the comparability
between assessments
• Assessments are new or
changing
Allows teachers and principals
to individually tailor student
goals.
Challenges
Benefits
•
Particularly valuable for
teachers/schools with unique
student populations or high
mobility.
•
This is not the same as the goal-setting you
may typically see in schools.
•
Goals are scored against a state conversion
chart which makes the target-setting process
difficult and non-intuitive.
•
Before considering goal-setting, make sure
you understand the work and additional
training this entails.
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By 9/9
• School Local Measure Committees recommend whether or not to use goal-setting for
Local Measure.
• Principals decide the same for State Measure (where the option exists).
• Schools who choose goal-setting norm on expectations across classrooms.
• Schools administer baseline assessments.
September • 9/24 – DOE target reference tables and goal-setting worksheets released on Intranet.
October
• By 10/4 – Schools submit results of baseline assessments if they want data included in
DOE-suggested targets (otherwise submit by 10/31).
• By 10/15 – Principals submit grade/school level goals to superintendent for review.
• Teachers start process of goal-setting using baseline data and reference tables.
• 11/1 – Schools can access goal-setting worksheets which include baseline results and DOEsuggested targets.
November • 11/15 – Principals finalize teacher-set goals. Superintendents finalize school/grade goals.
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
Teachers set goals for students in their classroom (target population:
individual), but when goals go beyond an individual teacher’s students
(target population: grade or school), the principal sets the goal and
the superintendent approves.
Target Population
Individual Level
• By student; or
• By subgroups of students; or
• Whole class goal
Teachers
Principals
Set
Approve*
Super.
Grade Level
• By subgroups of students; or
• Whole grade goal
Set
Approve
School Level
• By subgroups of students; or
• Whole school goal
Set
Approve
* If a teacher fails to submit goals, the principal will set the goals for that teacher. The principal
should not simply “approve,” but rather work with the teacher on adjusting targets as necessary.
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Please use your MOSL FAQ Document to
complete the MOSL quiz (orange paper)
(First principal finished will receive a
prize!!)
•
NYC Performance Assessments are available in multiple K-12 subjects, some as
optional, others as required. These include baseline and end-of-year
assessments (no additional selections for baseline needed).
•
If the principal and/or committee chooses the default option, the mandated NYC
Performance Assessments in grades 4-8 ELA for the Local Measure do not
need to be administered as all teachers in the school will use the default
measure.
•
There are Performance Assessments required in some grades/subjects for the
State Measure. Those assessments are not affected by the selection of the
default option for the Local Measure.
•
In most grades/subjects with Performance Assessments, there is one type
of assessment. However, in K-8 ELA, committees have two options within
the Performance Assessment category:
•
Running Records NYC Performance Assessment (using one of three reading
programs) (TC, DRA, F&P)
•
Writing-based NYC Performance Assessment
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Considerations:
 Review of where they exist on assessment list




ELA (writing-based): K-12
Math: Grade 3, Integrated Algebra
Social Studies: 6-8, Global History, U.S. History
Science: 4, 6-8, Living Environment
In K-8 ELA, also have choice of Running Records.
 All NYC Performance Assessments (except ELA) translated
into 9 languages.

Require norming on rubrics at the school level.
 Samples available for download (final versions by 9/9).

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By 9/9
September
October
•Final performance assessments released online
•School Local Measure Committees recommend whether or not to administer
Performance Assessments where optional. Principal approves or chooses default.
•For ELA K-8, principals and committees decide between Running Records and a
writing-based performance assessment.
•Principals plan necessary teacher support around administration and scoring.
•Schools develop scoring protocols.
•Schools norm teachers on Performance Assessment rubrics to ensure a shared
understanding of demands of the rubric and scoring across student work.
•Teachers administer Performance Assessments.
•Schools score and scan Performance Assessments. Must submit scores by 10/4 for
inclusion in DOE targets (otherwise by 10/31).
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Objective
Participants will be able to interpret a sample NYC Performance
Assessment by analyzing the requirements for students and predicting
students’ strengths and struggles.
Activity
Preview the sample NYC Performance Assessment and consider the four
key questions on the handout. Use the chart to take notes while you’re
reviewing the task and texts. Share your reflections with your table.
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Objective
Participants will be able to apply the rubric as an evaluative tool for
scoring student writing and establish a shared understanding of the
expectations of the NYC Performance Assessments.
Activity
Individually read and score Sample 1 according to the rubric. For
this experience, you are only asked to grade the rubric dimension of
“Focus: Position”, and then discuss your findings with your table.
Refer to evidence in the sample of student work and the rubric to
justify your choices and seek consensus. Repeat the process for
Sample 2 (time permitting).
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12th Grade ELA Sample A
Rubric Dimensions
My Score
Normed
Score
12th Grade ELA Sample B
Evidence from the Text
My Score
Focus:
Position
Development:
Elaboration
Development:
Textual Analysis
Development:
Counterclaims
Reading
Organization
Conventions
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Normed
Score
Evidence from the Text
Objective
Participants will be able to analyze a sample of student work within a
specific element of the rubric to consider the implications of assessment
practices on instruction and the development of student skills.
Activity
Choose one dimension/trait (in this case, we will choose “Focus:
Position”) from the rubric to analyze in-depth. List the rubric
dimension and key characteristics of the rubric, then use this as a lens
to reread and analyze the sample. With this new lens, consider the
student’s strengths and struggles as well as strategies that might
support the student’s growth.
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Objective
Participants will reflect on the cycle of assessment and identify the
implications of this assessment option for a variety of stakeholders.
They will then plan next steps.
Activity
As you review additional sample tasks, consider the implications of the
NYC Performance Assessments on various stakeholders. As a result of
today’s activities, what are the next steps? What questions, comments,
or considerations are you contemplating?
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Reflection Notes
Administration
•
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Data Specialists
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Teachers
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