Welcome to the Durham Farm and Food Network

Report
FOOD SYSTEM NETWORKS: IT’S ALL
ABOUT RELATIONSHIPS!
Christy Gabbard, Local Concepts LLC
December 5, 2014
Christy Shi Day
Community Food Systems
Engagement Strategist
Jared Cates
Community Mobilizer
w w w.community foodst rateg ies. org
Overview
When network works
Purpose of a network
Example of a network in development
Steps to create a network
Food System Conversations
Have Quickly Evolved
Farmers Markets
CSAs
2000
Farm to Restaurant
Food Hubs
Farm to Institution
Processing Centers
2014
The way in which we feed ourselves
represents a complex system.
Producing
Disposing
Delivering
Financial
Social/
Cultural
Food System
Elements
&
Pressures
Consuming
Political
Purchasing
Processing
Marketing
Adapted from Cornell’s “Discovering the Food System” curriculum.
Contextual/
Environmental
A system, by definition, involves complexity
and many, many connections.
There are many diverse food system stakeholders.
Elected Officials
Chambers of Commerce
Restaurant Associations
Museums and Historical Associations
Farm Service Agency
Marketing Groups
Soil and Water Conservation
Land Trusts
Health Practitioners
Hardware, Feed & Seed Stores
Higher Education
Distributors Parks and Recreation Community Gardens
Community Foundations
Hospitals
Cooperative Extension
Food Bloggers & Writers
Local Farm & Food Orgs
Youth Organizations Grocery/Convenience Stores
Farm Bureau
Educators (K-12)
Economic Development
Nature Groups
Culinary Schools
Social Services
Watershed Groups
Media
Tourism
People with Networks Environment/Sustainability Offices
Faith-Based Organizations
Dealer/Packers/Processors
Farmers Markets
Food Hubs/Aggregators
Food Banks
Public Health
Local Government
Community College
Planning & Code Enforcement
Banks & Funding Agencies
Civic Clubs and Organizations Small Business Centers
Future Farmers of America
Natural Resource Conservation Service
School System Nutritionists
Waste Management
We often have a limited view of the system.
Blind Men and the Elephant By John Godfrey Saxe (1816–1887)
Solutions are often unknown,
because the causes are complex.
loss of farmland
poverty
aging farmers
poor diet choices
Our default approaches are heavily
influenced by hierarchical concepts.
Network approaches are better suited
to address the structure of complexity.
A network approach is useful when…
1) The Problem Or Opportunity is Big
2) You Need New Ideas
3) The Solution Is Not Clear
4) You Need Diverse Engagement
Adopted from the Network Weaver Handbook by June Holley (2012)
Essential elements of a network approach…
1) Encourage Sharing
2) Encourage Inclusion
3) Encourage Experimentation & Reflection
Adopted from the Network Weaver Handbook by June Holley (2012)
Action
Transformative
Alignment
Transitional
Connection
Time
Transactional
Chesapeake Foodshed Network
Example
CFN Development 2012-2015
2012
2014
2015
Conceived of the idea
Determined a need an interest in establishing a network
Received funding
Hired a network coordinator
Took the pulse of the leadership group
Established a communication strategy for the Leadership
Committee and Network Behavior
Network learning – presentation, webinars, panel
discussions
Establish a Strategic Planning Committee
Leadership Committee Retreat to get agreement on
network purpose, priorities, frame work, and action items
Work on action items: Network Event
Broaden participation
Chesapeake Foodshed Network
Vision
A Sustainable, Resilient and Inclusive Regional Food
System that Supports Strong Communities and a Healthy
Bay.
Mission
Catalyze connections and collaboration in the
Chesapeake Bay Watershed to enhance and build a
sustainable, resilient and inclusive regional food system.
Chesapeake Foodshed Network
Work Groups
General Network Building:
•Steering Committee
•Strategic Planning Work Group
Food
Access
Environmental
Health
Production &
Processing
Land
Conservation
& Access
Job
Creation
Aggregation
&
Distribution
Steering
Committee
&
Coordinator
Disposal &
Recovery
Consumption
Policy &
Regulations
Energy
Marketing &
Education
Purchasing
Finance
Transportation
Production
Aggregation
Policy
Marketing
Production
Production
Policy
Production
Distribution
Aggregation
Marketing
Chesapeake Foodshed Network is a dynamic
place of relationships, learning, and action.
Apply a network approach by…
Developing Relationships
• Add formal networking
time to each meeting
• Co-opt an existing
gathering to network
• Expand the types of
voices in your group
Apply a network approach by…Building
Structural Support
• Use CFSA or other
listservs to share
information on a
regular basis
• Encourage identification
and sharing of
resources, such as skills,
money, space, and
equipment.
Apply a network approach by…
Acting as a Network Weaver
• LEARN about the interests
and needs of individuals
and groups in your
community.
• LOOK for opportunities to
connect needs and haves.
• SHARE information,
helping people connect
with one another directly.
How a Network Can Add Value
Strength in numbers
Quicker learning curve
Encouragement to continue
Continuing professional development
More collaboration than competition
Taking different perspectives given the complexity of the
system
Each of us taking a piece that can blend into solutions
Increasing knowledge of valuable resources
Telling and sharing the story; ensuring the story travels
Conversations about how we evaluate success and we
look at evaluation together
Mindset shift that we each have a piece of the answer
Resources
Blogs:
http://interactioninstitute.org/author/curtis/
Books:
•Network Weaver Handbook – June Holley
•Networks that Work – Paul Vandeventer
Networks
http://www.reamp.org/
http://www.vtfoodatlas.com/network
www.foodsolutionsne.org/
www.rifoodcouncil.org
Christy Gabbard, Local Concepts LLC
Chesapeake Foodshed Network
[email protected]
540-558-8010

similar documents