Productive Talk about Complex Text

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Productive Talk about Complex Text
One Sentence at a Time
Sarah Michaels, Clark University
Cathy O’Connor, Boston University
Briefly, why aim for talk and discussion?
•Talk reveals understanding and
misunderstanding.
• Talk supports academic language development.
• Talk supports deeper reasoning.
• Talk supports social development and
perspective taking.
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
In addition…
it’s fundamental to the Common Core!
At the core of the Common Core (in ALL subjects):
• Reasoning with evidence.
• Building arguments and critiquing the arguments
of others.
• Developing rigorous, conceptually strong,
evidence-based thinking practices.
• Participating in reasoning-oriented practices,
with others.
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
So why do you think some people
would say that their ancestry is
“American”?
What if the response is this:
24 blank faces. 1 or 2 hands up.
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
You think:
They need time to think!
(and maybe time to
practice what they want to
say!)
Tools: Wait time
Stop and jot (60 seconds!)
Turn and talk (60 seconds!)
(Then ask the question again.)
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
So now why do you think some
people would say that their ancestry
is “American”? Who has an idea?
What if the response is this:
Javier: Well, the thing is, it’s not… American… like…
yeah.
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
You think:
Huh?? I didn’t
understand that at all!
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
Now what do I do? I
don’t want to embarrass
him, and I don’t want to
feel like I’m putting him
on the spot…
Useful talk tool:
“Say more…”
• Can you say more about that?
• Could you say that again?
• Could you give us an example?
• So let me see if I understand what
you’re saying. Are you saying…?
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
A closer look at
one talk move…
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
So let me see if I understand what
you’re saying. What you said was….
Is that right?
(Revoicing)
(Verifying and Clarifying)
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
What is happening here?
•The teacher is confused at first, but then
gets a clearer sense of what the student
understands and doesn’t understand.
This is formative assessment at its best.
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
What is happening here?
• The student realizes that the teacher
wants to understand her contribution.
The teacher doesn’t just assume that she
is wrong.
Over time, this can have a profound
effect.
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
What is happening here?
• The student can accept or reject the teacher's
interpretation, which positions the student as a
legitimate participant in the intellectual
enterprise.
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
A simple but powerful talk move:
So you’re saying that
_________?
Am I understanding you right?
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
So now why do you think some
people would say that their ancestry
is “American”? Who has an idea?
Maybe you’ll get something like this:
Rita: Well, some people might ask
why the government is
asking what group they feel
part of. They might not feel
like part of any group? Like
they might not really feel like
they have an ancestry?
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
You think:
Wow! That’s good! But
to talk about that,
everybody has to hear it.
Did everybody get it?
Useful talk tool:
“Can anyone
rephrase or repeat
that?”
• Could somebody put that in their own
words?
• That had a lot of information in it.
Who could repeat some of that for
us?
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
So why use this move?
Which of the four goals does it help you with?
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
So now why do you think some
people would say that their ancestry
is “American”? Who has an idea?
Or you might get something like this:
Kimberly:
They just don’t know what to
write.
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
You think:
I think everyone heard
that, but it’s kind of
minimal. We need to dig
deeper into her
reasoning.
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
Useful talk tool:
“Why do you think
that?”
• What’s your evidence?
• Can you explain your reasoning to
us?
• How did you figure that out?
• Did something in the text make you
think that?
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
So now why do you think some
people would say that their ancestry
is “American”? Who has an idea?
Still another possibility: what if. . .
Jessica: It might be that they’re
rejecting their culture,
because they don’t want to
be called that. Like…to
avoid prejudice?
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
You think:
They heard her, and this
is great discussion
material. I want them to
connect with her
thinking!
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
Useful talk tool:
“What do other
people think about
that?”
• Who agrees or disagrees and why?
• Who wants to add on to that?
• Does anyone have a different view?
• What do you think about that?
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
Agree or disagree and why?
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
So now why do you think some
people would say that their ancestry
is “American”? Who has an idea?
Still another possibility: what if a student says
James: Because they’re
not… immigrants?
They, like, their
parents were born
here?
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
You think:
That’s not really on
target, but it might be
productive to discuss
it…
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
Cycle back to the four
talk move families:
• Say more
• Can someone rephrase that?
• Why do you think that?
• What do other people think?
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
So now why do you think some
people would say that their ancestry
is “American”? Who has an idea?
Or what if a student says
JB: Does ancestry mean
like your aunts? His
aunts are American?
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
You think:
That’s wrong, and I don’t
think it’s going to be
helpful to discuss it
right now…
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
Use your best
judgment about how to
move on…
• Well, actually…
(correct misunderstanding)
• Repeat question
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
So now why do you think some people would
say that their ancestry is “American”? Who
has an idea?
Finally, what if…
Discussion ensues…
It’s going well… but soon, several
students in a row contribute compelling
personal narratives that are…
way off track!
S. Michaels & C. O’Connor
You think:
We’re way off track.
They’re engaged, but
this isn’t the question…
Use your best
judgment about how to
get back on track…
• Can you link this back to our
question?
• Can someone tell us how this relates
to our first topic?
• Gee, what WAS our question? Who
can remind us?
So if you can keep yourself from saying
“Good!” and “Right!” and “Try again…”
you’ll be giving your students a great gift.
Sources
• Aspen Institute
• Council of Great City Schools
• WIDA
• 2012 WIDA Debut Conference
• DPI Disciplinary Online Module
Presentation Development
Charlotte “Nadja” Trez, NCDPI ESL/Title III Office
Ivanna Mann Thrower, NCDPI ESL/Title III Office
Lindsey Fults, Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools
Deborah Wilkes, Durham County Schools
NCDPI WIDA/Common Core Task Force
Contacts
Ivanna Mann Thrower
ESL/Title III Consultant
NC Department of Public Instruction
919-807-3860
[email protected]
Charlotte “Nadja” Trez
ESL/Title III Consultant
NC Department of Public Instruction
919-807-3861
[email protected]
ESL Website http://esl.ncwiseowl.org/

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