Healthy Weight Matters Module 3

Report
Healthy Before Pregnancy
March of Dimes
NC Preconception Health
Campaign
Healthy weight matters:
Lesson Plan 3
Body Mass Index
Body Mass Index
• A measure used to
compare your
weight to your
height
• Used to assess your
risk for weightrelated health
conditions
Image source: Office on Women's Health
Weight connections
• Now that you know which weight zone
you are in, how do you think
adolescents across the state measure
up?
NC Parent Assessment of Adolescent
Child’s Weight Status, 2008
NC Public Health Care Provider Assessment of Female
Patients’ Weight Status Ages 12-18, 2008
NC high school females
self report on weight status
Weight connections
• NC adolescents are
getting heavier
• Weight status
before pregnancy
may be connected
to the health of
future babies
• Most NC births are
to women over 18
years
Factors that can affect
women’s weight
• Age
• Weight increases with age
• Income level
• Obesity increases as income level
decreases
• Race/Ethnicity
• Overweight and obesity highest among
Native Americans and African-Americans
Women’s weight: NC compared
to U.S.
• Almost 58% of women in NC of
childbearing age (18-44) are
overweight or obese
• Among women of all ages, 60% of NC
women are overweight compared to
55% across the US
Percentage of NC Mothers
Overweight/obesity among new
mothers in NC
Trends in the Percentage of N.C. Overweight or
Obese Mothers (1997-2005)
50
40
34%
39%
41%
2000-2002
2003-2005
30
20
10
0
1997-1999
Source: North Carolina Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System Survey Data. N.C. State Center for Health
Statistics (1997-1999, 2000-2002, 2003-2005)
Obesity, pregnancy and race in NC
Trends in the Percentage of N.C. Obese PrePregnancy Mothers by Race (1997-2005)
Percentage of Mothers
50
40
30
21%
20
28%
25%
14%
16%
18%
2000-2002
2003-2005
10
0
1997-1999
White
African American
Source: North Carolina Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System Survey Data. N.C. State Center for
Health Statistics (1997-1999, 2000-2002, 2003-2005)
Weight connections
and your future
• Do you want to
become a parent
someday?
• If so, when would you
ideally like to have
your first child?
• What year do you
want to become a
parent?
• How old will you be?
Why weight really does matter
• A woman’s weight
before pregnancy
may affect her
health during
pregnancy, as well
as influence the
health of her baby.
Obese women are more
likely to…
Have early and/or recurrent miscarriage
Have pregnancy related diabetes
Develop dangerously high blood pressure
Have a baby with a birth defect
Have a baby born prematurely (too
soon)
• Have cesarean sections
• Develop infections during and after
childbirth
•
•
•
•
•
Babies born to obese
pregnant women…
• Are at a higher risk of:
• Birth defects
• Stillbirth
• Dying in the first 28 days of
life
• High birth weight (>9.9 lbs)
• Developing obesity, high
blood pressure and the
inability to process glucose
• Low infant reflex scores
1 and 5 minutes after birth
• Not being breastfed
The cycle repeats
• Babies born to
overweight mothers
are more likely to
become obese
adults
• The likelihood that
overweight children
will become obese
adults is almost 9
times higher than the
risk for children who
are not overweight
Beyond pregnancy…
• Women who are
overweight or obese are
more likely to have:
• A higher risk of uterine
cancer (2-5 times
greater)
• Increased risk of death
from uterine and breast
cancers
• Problems getting
pregnant
• Greater risk of
contraception/birth
control not working
• Irregular periods
• Depression
myeatsmartmovemore.com
• Enjoy more fruits and veggies
• Prepare more meals at home
• Right-size your portions
myeatsmartmovemore.com
• Choose to move more every day
• Breastfeed your baby
myeatsmartmovemore.com
• Tame the tube
• Re-think your
drink
Weight does matter
• For NC to have more healthy babies
young adults need to work together to
change our health
• Learn about healthy food preparation
and change old habits
• Be an advocate for yourself and for
your current or future partner
Healthy birthdays ahead
• Being at a healthy weight now as a
teen and through young adulthood
puts you and your future family at a
HUGE advantage later

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