OpenFlow Controllers Comparison

Report
OpenFlow Controllers
Marcelo Pinheiro
September 23rd, 2011
Agenda
• OpenFlow Components
• OpenFlow Controllers
• OpenFlow software switch Options
OpenFlow Components
Reference: http://www.openflow.org/wp/openflowcomponents/
OpenFlow Controllers
Controllers Languages
Docs
OpenSource
Institutions
Multithrea Notes
ded
NOX
C++/Phyto
n
Good
Yes
Nicira Networks
Yes
Widely
used
Maestro
Java
Fair
Yes
Rice University
Yes
No Ref.
Trema
C/Ruby
Poor
Yes
Yes
No Ref.
Beacon
Java
Good
Yes
Stanford
Yes
Very used
Helios
C
?
No
NEC
No Ref.
BigSwitch* Java
?
No
BigSwitch
Production
Network
SNAC**
?
No
Nicira Networks
Production
Network
C++/Phyto
n
* Based on Beacon
** Based on NOX 0.4
All controllers support OpenFlow 1.0
OpenFlow Controllers Performance
TEST SETUP – May 17th, 2011
• CPU: 1 x Intel Core i7 930 @ 3.33ghz, 4 physical cores, 8 threads
• RAM: 9GB
• OS: Ubuntu 10.04.1 LTS x86_64
– Kernel: 2.6.32-24-generic #43-Ubuntu SMP Thu Sep 16 14:58:24 UTC 2010
x86_64 GNU/Linux
– Boost Library: v1.42 (libboost-all-dev)
– malloc: Google's Thread-Caching Malloc version 0.98-1
– Java: Sun Java 1.6.0_25
• Test methodology
– cbench is run locally via loopback, the 4th thread's performance is slightly
impacted
– cbench emulates 32 switches, sending packet-ins from 1 million source MACs
per switch
– 10 loops of 10 seconds each are run 3 times and averaged per thread/switch
combination
– tcmalloc loaded first export LD_PRELOAD=/usr/lib/libtcmalloc_minimal.so.0
– Launched with taskset -c 7 ./cbench -c localhost -p 6633 -m 10000 -l 10 -s 32 M 1000000 -t
OpenFlow Controllers Performance
OpenFlow Controllers Performance
TEST SETUP – May 1st, 2011
• Machines: 2 x Dell PowerEdge 2950 (1 for controller, 1 for benchmarker
and packet capturing)CPU: 2 x Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5405 (4 Cores, 12M
Cache, 2.00 GHz, 1333 MHz FSB)
• RAM: 4GB
• Network: 2 x Gigabit ports (tg3 driver)
– Buffer sizes: TODO
– TCP setting:
• OS: Debian Squeeze 32-bit
–
–
–
–
Kernel: 2.6.32-5-686-bigmem
Boost Library: v1.42 (libboost-all-dev)
malloc: Google's Thread-Caching Malloc (libgoogle-perftools-dev)
Java: Sun Java 1.6.0_24 (sun-java6-jdk)
• Connectivity: machines are connected via 2 directly attached gigabit links.
Directly connected interfaces have IP addresses in the same broadcast
domain. The second connection is used to run a second instance of the
benchmarker software in case more bandwidth is needed for the test.
OpenFlow Controllers Performance
•
Controller configuration:
–
–
–
–
•
•
Control application used: Layer-2 learning switch application. The switch application is a good
representative of the controller flow handling performance with tunable read/write ratio (number
of unique MAC addresses).
Running controllers: Turn off debugging and verbose output.
–
–
–
–
•
•
nox: must be configured with "--enable-ndebug" passed to the configure script.
nox_d: must be configured with "--enable-ndebug --with-python=no" passed to the configure script.
beacon: see beacon.ini
maestro: see conf/openflow.conf
nox: ./nox_core -i ptcp:6633 switch
nox_d: ./nox_core -i ptcp:6633 switch -t $NTHREADS
beacon: ./beacon
maestro: ./runbackground.pl conf/openflow.conf conf/learningswitch.dag
Setting CPU affinity for controllers: The following script binds the running threads of a controller to
different CPUs (on an 8-core system). Just replace $CTRLNAME with a unique part of controller's
binary name (e.g., nox for nox and nox_d). (maestro's runbackground already sets cpu affinity).
Running the benchmarker:
–
–
Get the latest version of oflops and compile it.
Run with cbench -c $ctrladdr -p $port -s $nswitch -m $duration -l $loop -t where $ctrladdr and $port are
controller IP address and port number respectively, $nswitch is the number of emulated switches, $duration
is the duration of test, and $loop is the number of times to repeat the test. The -t option is for running the
throughput test: omit it for the latency test.
OpenFlow Controllers Performance
OpenFlow software switch Options
•
•
•
•
•
Reference Linux Switch: This implementation runs on the widest variety of systems
and is easy to port. It is also the slowest, as it cannot take advantage of multiple
CPUs and requires kernel-to-user-space transitions. It supports as many ports as
you can fit in a PC (8+), including wired and wireless ports. Select platform for
further instructions:
NetFPGA Switch: This switch offers line-rate performance for 4 Gigabit ports,
regardless of packet size, via hardware acceleration. It requires the purchase of a
NetFPGA card, which is $500 for researchers and $1000 for industry. More
NetFPGA details are available at www.netfpga.org.
Open vSwitch: Open vSwitch is a multilayer virtual switch, licensed under the open
source Apache 2 license, with OpenFlow support. Open vSwitch currently supports
multiple virtualization technologies including Xen/XenServer, KVM, and VirtualBox.
OpenWRT: By porting OpenFlow support to OpenWrt, we convert a cheap
commercial wireless router and access point into an OpenFlow-enabled switch
with a WebUI and a CLI.
NetMagic – The platform is designed with a novel patented architecture, where a
common high-density Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) device with a
combination of commodity Ethernet switching chip can provide the both the highspeed Gigabit Ethernet switching capacity and reconfigurable user-defined packet
handling function.
NetMagic x NetFPGA
Table 2 Comparison of NetMagic and NetFPGA
NetFPGA
Original
Design goals
Evaluation Board for creating
and testing working program
on Xilinx FPGA
Equipment
Form
Network card requesting the
host machine to provide
hardware and software
environment for running
NetMagic V1
NetMagic V2
Open reconfigurable network switching platform for the
innovative research of next generation Internet
architecture
Standard, standalone network equipment with high
availability and reliability
1 Ethernet 100/1000M
uplink port + 24 Ethernet
10/100M ports
24 Ethernet 100/1000M
ports + 1 Ethernet
10/100M port for outband management
Interfaces
4 Ethernet 100/1000M ports
Programmable
devices and
features
Xilinx Virtex-II Pro XC2VP50
53,136 Logic Units 4,914Kb
embedded RAM
Main external
devices
onboard
4MB SRAM64MB DDR2
SDRAM
Management
Software
Dependent on the board
Independent of host, support management via Socket
programming on any platform
Developing
Complexity
Open interface design, users
need to develop complex
logic by themselves
Open UMS(User Module Socket)interface are
defined clearly. Users can only focus on their core
processing logic, rather than other Irrelevant logic
Altera Arria II GX
Altera Cyclone II
EP2AGX125 118,143 Logic
EP2C35F672 33,216 Logic
Units 8,121Kb embedded
Units472Kb embedded RAM
RAM
4MB SRAM 128Kx72b TCAM
4MB SRAM256MB-2GB
DDR2 SODIMMSwitch
chip with 24 GMII
Expedient
References
• OpenFlow – http://www.openflow.org/
• NOX - http://noxrepo.org/wp/
• Beacon https://openflow.stanford.edu/display/Beacon/Hom
e
• Maestro - http://code.google.com/p/maestroplatform/
• Trema - http://trema.github.com/trema/
• SNAC - http://www.openflow.org/wp/snac/
• Big Switch – http://www.bigswitch.com/
• SNAC - http://snacsource.org
• NetMagic – http://www.netmagic.org/

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