Presentation Kevin Marshall

Report
Dr. Kevin Marshall
Microsoft Ireland
Microsoft and Education
Now is the time for change?
•
What do we expect students to know/
how do we teach it?
•
How do we assess it
•
What role does technology play?
Changing Demands on Student Skills…
Today’s Learning Challenge
•
Societal change from labor intensive work
to knowledge intensive work
•
Constant advancements in technology
and ability to keep current
•
Future jobs can only be imagined
•
Today’s students — “digital natives” —
learn differently than many of today’s
educators.
T. Shawki, Global UNESCO ICT-CFT Coordinator
Skills In Demand Have Changed
Source: Levy and Murnane, for the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)
Personalised Learning
Connected
Learning
Communities
1:1 Learning
Analytics
Optimised Education Infrastructure
Personalised Learning
Address
individual
learning styles
and learning
needs
Range of
courses
delivered by
multiple
agencies
Spectrum
of tools
and content
Communication
and
collaboration
Data driven
decision making
Education
Analytics
Platform
Optimised Education Infrastructure
Microsoft Partners in
Learning
• Worldwide Programme
• $500 Million in funding
• In 107 Countries
• Over 4 million Teachers trained
Microsoft Partners in
Learning
Innovative Schools Programme
Innovative Teachers Programme
Pre-Service Teachers programme
Assessment and Teaching
of 21st Century Skills
Ways of thinking
• Creativity and innovation
• Critical thinking, problem solving, decision making
Ways of working
• Communication
• Collaboration (teamwork)
Tools for working
• Information literacy
• ICT literacy
Living in the world
•
•
•
•
From the ACT21S project: http://www.act21s.org
Citizenship — local and global
Life and career
Personal and social responsibility
Delivering high percentage of STEM-D Skills
Introduction and Methodology
Microsoft Partners in Learning conducted a survey among educators in 8 countries between Feb and July 2010. This survey
measured educators’ attitudes and self-reported teaching practices. Partners in Learning plans to conduct this survey
periodically to monitor how these attitudes and practices are changing.
The objective of this research is to provide information of value to the broader education community to inform educator
professional development and policy directions. Data and survey questionnaires for each country are available upon request
(send requests to [email protected]).
The survey was conducted online in the local language among
educators in each country.
Method
The samples in each country are not nationally representative
samples of the educator population.
United Kingdom(UK)
(n = 223)
Ukraine(UA)
Romania(RO)
(n = 3864)
(n = 590)
Interested researchers are welcome to compare the survey
respondent demographics with the demographics of the
national educator population to assess the representativeness
of this sample.
Portugal(PT)
(n = 1048)
Survey
Sample
Email invites were sent by Microsoft and local country partners
such as Ministries of Education (MoE) to the educators (see
details of survey distribution for each country in Appendix,
slide 27).
El Salvador(SV)
(n = 192)
The survey was also announced on the PIL network and
launched during Innovative Teachers Forums (ITF).
Chile(CL)
(n = 831)
Response
Rate
Out of 7060 responding educators, 3566 teachers have
participated in Partners in Learning programs.
Response rates varied by country. See Appendix, slide 27 .
Worldwide (WW) Sample: 7060
China(CN)
(n = 200)
Japan(JP)
(n = 112)
Innovative Teaching and Learning Research Model
This study is based on the teacher survey developed for a broader multinational study called Innovative Teaching and
Learning (ITL) Research which is sponsored by Microsoft Partners in Learning and has advisors from UNESCO, OECD, the
World Bank and other organizations. For more information, see www.itlresearch.com.
The Innovative Teaching Survey reported in this document focuses on measuring key elements of the ITL Research Model,
including teachers’ assessments of their School’s Culture and Support, ICT Access and Support, their own Attitudes and
finally the extent of Innovative Teaching Practices they use in their classrooms.
ITL RESEARCH MODEL
THIS REPORT’S FOCUS
NATIONAL
SCHOOL and TEACHER
CLASSROOM
STUDENT
School Culture
and Supports
Education Policy
ICT Access and
Supports
Program Supports
Educator Attitudes
13
Innovative Teaching
Practices
Students’ 21st
Century Skills
Key Research Insights
1) Educators who
participated in this survey,
have strong constructivist
or student-centric
pedagogical philosophies;
the challenge is to put
these beliefs into practice
in their classrooms.
• These educators report
frequently using innovative
teaching practices such as
‘personalizing learning’ and
‘knowledge building’ for
students, but they also report
limited integration of ICT in
learning.
• Among these educators,
student access to ICT, rather
than educator training or
access is the key challenge.
(see Insight 2).
2) Educators who took this
survey reported that the
top barrier to ICT usage in
teaching and learning was
“Not enough computers for
student use.”
• 77% of respondents worldwide
said this was a barrier to ICT
use in the classroom.
• Most educators and students
have more access to ICT
outside of school than they do
in the classroom. This
suggests that when teachers
practice extending learning
beyond the classroom, they
can leverage the access to ICT
outside of the classroom that
students have.
3) Educators who participate
in Partners in Learning
programs, use ICT in
teaching and learning
significantly more
frequently than educators
who do not participate in
these programs, and they
ask their students to use
ICT more as well.
• Respondents who participate
in Partners in Learning
programs report more teacher
and student ICT usage than
non-participants.
• However, these relationships
may be due to the selfselected nature of program
participants (more innovative
teachers choose to participate
in the programs).
4) Though respondents
see very high value in
teacher and student
use of ICT for teaching
and learning, they do
not incorporate ICT
frequently in their
teaching and learning
practices.
• Respondents show
significantly more low
level tech use than
medium or high level tech
use. This suggests
technology is still used
primarily to do traditional
teaching tasks. High level
ICT use is associated with
st
students’ usage of 21
Century skills in other
related research.*
14
*See the Innovative Schools Program Evaluation, Year 2 Report by SRI International at www.itlresearch.com Research and Reports.
ICT Competencies
for Teachers
Integrating ICT
• What do we mean by integrating ICT?
• How far can we take this:
– Do you know of any really good examples of ICT
integration?
• What are the implications for:
– the role of the teacher
– the content and skills being learned
Competency Framework for Teachers (CFT)
• Designed by UNESCO as a world wide standard
• To help educational policy-makers and curriculum
developers identify the skills teachers need to
harness technology in the service of education.
• Developed in cooperation with Cisco, Intel and
Microsoft, as well as the International Society
for Technology in Education (ISTE)
CFT Purpose
• Outlines a basic set of qualifications that
allows teachers to integrate ICT into their
teaching and learning, to advance student
learning, and to improve other professional
duties.
• Identifies levels of progression
from technology literacy to
knowledge creation.
Developing the CFT Matrix
ICT Components
Connecting education policy with economic development
• Increase the
technological
uptake of students,
citizens, and the
workforce.
TECHNOLOGY
LITERACY
• Increase the
ability to use
knowledge to add
value to society
and the economy.
KNOWLEDGE
DEEPENING
• Increase the ability of
students, citizens, and
the workforce to
innovate, produce new
knowledge and benefit
from this new
knowledge.
KNOWLEDGE
CREATION
ICT Competencies
Components
Some changes in focus:
• From teacher to student
• From content to skills
• From individual to group learning
Approaches
The Competency Standards
I.D.11. Use common communication and
collaboration technologies, such as text
messaging, video conferencing, and web-based
collaboration and social environments.
II.C.1. Describe how collaborative, projectbased
learning and ICT can support student thinking and
social interaction, as students come to understand
key concepts, processes, and skills in the subject
matter and use them to solve real-world problems.
III.E.1. Play a leadership role in
creating a vision of
what their school might be like with ICT
integrated
into the curriculum and classroom
practices.
Bringing it all together
• Microsoft, one of the original CFT partners has taken
this on to the next step by creating Educators Learning
Journeys.
• Ireland has been chosen as the first country to pilot
this world-wide so you are the first teachers to use
this.
Educator Learning Journeys
Basic Digital Literacy Skills
Hosted Learning System
Assess
Learning
Gaps
Indentify teacher
needs
Learning
Content
• Tech Literacy
Strand of CFT
Provide courses
when and where
required
Certificates
of
Completion
Demonstrate
teacher
progress
Microsoft
Technology
Literacy
Certification
for Teachers
Internationally
recognised
certification
Educator Learning Journeys Curriculum
• Project Objectives
– 21st Century Teacher
• Courses
– 40+ hours content
•
•
•
•
6 courses
24 units
62 tutorials
6 assessments
– Global Program – multilingual
• Hosted Learning System
– Skills gap analysis
– Rich content presentation
– Social Media tools
ELJ Self Assessment
• Using the ELJ self assessment to determine where you are at.
• It beings you through a series of scenarios and you are
provided with four options.
• There is not necessarily a right or wrong answer – you need to
go with your gut instinct rather than trying to determine what
the correct choice is.
• This will provide you with a list of recommended learning
units tailored to your own needs.
Report
Technology Literacy Curriculum Outline
1.
Policy and Vision:
Why Does the UNESCO ICT-CFT Promote Technology Literacy?
2.
Curriculum and Assessment:
Selecting ICT Resources to Support Curriculum Outcomes
3.
Pedagogy:
How Do Technology and Pedagogy Mix?
4.
Basic Tools:
Using Basic ICT Tools to Support Teaching and Learning
5.
Standard Classroom:
Organize and Manage the Use of ICT in Your Classroom
6.
Digital Literacy:
Technology Literacy and Your Professional Development
ELJ Website
http://eljmicrosoft.intuition.com
Piloting in Ireland
• First world-wide use of ELJ with teachers
• 220 teachers in Ireland, working with:
–
–
–
–
–
City of Dublin VEC
Meath VEC
INTO
St. Patrick’s College of Education
Marino Institute of Education
• How does this fit into a CPD programme for
teachers in Ireland?
ELJ – Results
* Based on 112 completed unit surveys
ELJ – Teacher Feedback
“The ELJ made me appreciate
how much more tutors need
to integrate ICT into all areas
of teaching and learning even my own learning!”
“Content very relevant and
inspiring. Good mix of styles of
presentation, text, buttons and
video helped keep the module
interesting.”
“I come from an adult
learning area, where the
emphasis is on learner
centred learning. Now I can
follow through on the ICT
side, facilitating adult
learners to maximise their
ICT potential alongside
their literacy development.”
Questions

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