Title I, Part D Data Reporting and Evaluation: What You

Report
Title I, Part D Data Reporting and Evaluation:
What You Need To Know
Dory Seidel and Jenna Tweedie, NDTAC
Karen Neilson, California Department of Education
1
Overview
• Context Around Title I, Part D Data
– Why States Must Collect and Submit Data: Statutory
Requirements
– Why the Data Are Important: Federal Use of Data
– Why the Data Are Important: State Use of Data
• Data Collection
– What To Collect: Federal and State Requirements
– How the Collected Data Can be Reviewed: Data Quality
• Data Reporting
– How To Report: CSPR, EDFacts
– When To Report: Federal Reporting Timeline
• Resources
2
Context Around Title I, Part D Data
Statutory Requirements
Federal Use of Data
State Use of Data
3
Why States Must Collect and Submit Data:
Statutory Requirements
Each State agency and local educational agency shall—
(1) submit evaluation results to the State educational agency and the Secretary; and
(2) use the results of evaluations under this section to plan and improve subsequent
programs for participating children and youth.
State and local agencies receiving Title I, Part D funds must evaluate their programs’
impact on the ability of students:
(1) to maintain and improve educational achievement;
(2) to accrue school credits that meet State requirements for grade promotion and
secondary school graduation;
(3) to make the transition to a regular program or other education program operated
by a local educational agency;
(4) to complete secondary school (or secondary school equivalency requirements)
and obtain employment after leaving the correctional facility or institution for
neglected or delinquent children and youth; and
(5) as appropriate, to participate in postsecondary education and job training
programs.
Source: Title I, Part D Statute, Subpart 3
4
Why States Must Collect and Submit Data:
Statutory Requirements (cont.)
Major Federal data collections for Title I, Part D
(Part D):
• Annual Child Count
– Used by U.S. Department of Education (ED) to
determine Title I, Part A and Title I, Part D funding
allocations
• Consolidated State Performance Report
(CSPR)/EDFacts
– Used by ED to demonstrate the effectiveness of Part D
programs
5
Why the Title I, Part D Data Are Important:
Federal Uses of Data
• Program evaluation and performance assessments
– Government Performance Results Act Modernization
Act of 2010 (GPRAMA)
– Federal Budget Requests to Congress
– In response to Congressional Requests (e.g.,
Elementary and Secondary Education Act
reauthorization)
• Public dissemination/use
– ED Data Express http://eddataexpress.ed.gov
– NDTAC’s Fast Facts and Annual Performance
Overviews
6
Why the Title I, Part D Data Are Important:
State Use of Data
• To plan effective planning and improvement,
including the following activities:
– Program evaluation
– Decision-making
– Goal setting
– Needs assessments
– Monitoring
7
Why the Title I, Part D Data Are Important:
State Use of Data−Example 1
8
Why the Title I, Part D Data Are Important:
State Use of Data−Example 2
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Data Collection
Federal Requirements
Data Quality
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What To Collect:
Federal Requirements
All Title I, Part D-funded programs must collect data to
report to ED.
Program categories:
• Neglected Programs
• Juvenile Detention
• Juvenile Corrections
• At-Risk Programs—Subpart 2 only
• Adult Corrections—Subpart 1 only
• Other Programs
Resources: CSPR Forms, CSPR Guide
11
What To Collect:
Federal Requirements (cont.)
Each State agency and LEA program submits data
in the following areas to ED:
• Student and facility counts
• Student demographics
• Transition services
• Academic and vocational outcomes
• Academic performance in reading and mathematics
Individual States may have additional
requirements.
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How the Collected Data Can Be Reviewed:
Data Quality
• Data quality is best achieved when timely reviews are
done at each reporting level (e.g., program,
subgrantee, State).
• Educating subgrantees/programs on data collection
can improve data quality.
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Data Reporting Processes
CSPR/EDFacts
Federal Reporting Timeline
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How To Report:
Consolidated State Performance Report
• CSPR is a data collection instrument administered
annually by ED’s Office of Elementary and Secondary
Education (OESE).
• The required measures for Title I, Part D can be found
in CSPR section 2.4.
15
How To Report:
EDFacts
• EDFacts is an ED initiative to collect, analyze, report on,
and promote the use of high-quality performance data.
• Most of the Title I, Part D data are now reported through
EDFacts.
• Eventually, all CSPR data will be reported through the
EDFacts’ online Education Data Exchange Network
(EDEN) Submission System (ESS).
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How To Report:
CSPR and EDFacts
Category/Area
CSPR Tables
EDFacts Specification Files
Facility Counts/Programming
S1=2.4.1.1 & 2.4.1.1.1
S2=2.4.2.1 & 2.4.2.1.1
Not included
Student Count/Demographics
S1=2.4.1.2
S2=2.4.2.2
S1=C119
S2=C127
Transition Services
S1=2.4.1.3.1
S2=2.4.2.3.1
S1 & S2=C182
Academic/Vocational
Outcomes
S1=2.4.1.3.2
S2=2.4.2.3.2
S1 & S2=In Program=C180
S1 & S2=Exited Program=C181
S1=2.4.1.6.1 & 2.4.1.6.2
S2=2.4.2.6.1 & 2.4.2.6.2
S1=C113
S2=C125
Pre- and Posttesting in
Reading and Math
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When To Report:
Federal Reporting Timeline
* Expected date is October, but files may be made available later
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Resources
• ED’s CSPR tables:
http://www2.ed.gov/admins/lead/account/consolidated/csprpart2131
4.doc
• ED’s EDFacts file specifications:
http://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/edfacts/sy-13-14-nonxml.html
• NDTAC’s data collection list: http://www.neglecteddelinquent.org/sites/default/files/NDTAC_CSPR_Collection_List_201
3-14_0.doc
• NDTAC’s forthcoming “CSPR Guide”
• State CSPR and EDFacts coordinators
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