PowerPoint Slides - National Center on Intensive Intervention

Report
Informal Academic Diagnostic
Assessment: Using Data to
Guide Intensive Instruction
Part 3: Miscue and Skills Analysis
This document was produced under U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, Award No. H326Q110005. Celia Rosenquist serves as the project officer. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the positions
or policies of the U.S. Department of Education. No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise mentioned in this document is intended or should be inferred.
Informal Academic Diagnostic Assessment:
Using Data to Guide Intensive Instruction
Administering Academic Progress Monitoring Data
Reviewing Progress Monitoring Data
Miscue and Skills Analysis
Identifying Target Skills
2
Purpose and Objectives
Purpose: Provide an introduction to the use of miscue
analysis to identify academic skill deficits for instructional
planning.
Objectives:
1. Learn how to analyze student miscues on Passage
Reading Fluency assessments to identify error types.
2. Learn how to analyze mathematics computation errors.
3
Miscue analysis
within the databased
individualization
(DBI) process
4
Purpose of Miscue Analysis
Student errors on curriculum-based
measures (CBMs) can be analyzed to
 Describe academic strengths and
weaknesses
 Help align intervention adaptations
with student need
5
Consider the Current Intervention
First
Before conducting miscue
analysis, ask
 Has the intervention been
implemented as planned?
 Is the student engaged in
the intervention?
 Is the progress monitoring
tool at the appropriate
level?
6
Possible Implementation Issues
 Intervention
• Fidelity
• Intensity
 Dosage
• Duration of intervention
• Session length
• Missed sessions
7
Possible Motivation Issues
 Student attention to
instruction
 Student effort during
intervention
 Student effort and
attention during
assessment
 Others?
8
Miscue and Skills Analysis in
Reading
9
Miscue Analysis in Reading
 Student reads a CBM passage out
loud.
 Administrator records errors.
 First 10 miscues are analyzed for
error type.
10
Types of Errors
 Graphophonetic
 Syntactic
 Semantic
11
Graphophonetic Error
 Preserves some important phonetics of the written word,
even if it does not make sense.
 Example: Written word is “friend,” but spoken word is
“fried.”
12
Syntactic Error
 Preserves the grammar of the written word.
 Example: “Ran” is the same part of speech as “jogged.”
13
Semantic Error
 Preserves the meaning of the sentence.
 Example: “The woman is tall” has the same meaning as
“the lady is tall.”
 Practice: what is a possible semantic miscue for the
written word “pony?”
14
Practice: Error Types
Provide an example of each error type for the underlined
word in the following written sentence:
Sally likes jelly on her biscuit.
Possible miscues:
 Graphophonetic: jolly
 Syntactic: mustard
 Semantic: jam
15
Quick Miscue Analysis Table
Written Word(s) Spoken Word(s) Graphophonetic
Syntactic
Semantic
1
2
3
4
5
See
handout:
Reading
Miscue
Analysis.
6
7
8
9
10
Percentage
16
Calculating Percentages
100 ×  
 =
 
For each error type column:
100 ×  ""
 =
= 10 ×  ""
10  
17
Miscue Analysis Example
Janet’s Passage
Reading Fluency
(PRF)
18
Janet’s Quick Miscue Analysis Table
1
2
3
4
5
6
Written Word(s) Spoken Word(s) Graphophonetic
yes – first
exciting
extra
part
yes – except
snow
now
initial s
yes – first
trouble
trains
part
yes – first and
learned
listened
end
yes – first and
forget
figure
middle g
yes – first and
driver
door
last
7
snowing
snake
8
driving
dumping
9
passengers
pencils
10
boy
baby
Percentage
yes – first part
yes – first and
end
yes – first and
last
yes – first and
last
100 %
Syntactic
Semantic
yes
no
yes
yes
yes
no
yes
no
yes
no
yes
no
no
no
yes
no
yes
no
yes
yes
90 %
20 %
19
What do Janet’s errors tell us?
Error Type
Graphophonetic
Syntactic
Semantic
Percentage Interpretation
100%
Always preserves at least
one sound—tries to
sound out unknown words
90%
Usually preserves
grammar.
20%
Usually does not
preserve meaning
20
Instructional Recommendations for
Janet
Janet may benefit from instruction and practice to help her
 Sound out all parts of a word
 Self-monitor and self-correct for meaning
• Cloze procedure
• Listen to recording of own reading
21
Practice: Reading Miscue Analysis
Reading Miscue Analysis
handout
 Sample PRF passage on
page 3
 Quick Miscue Analysis
Table on page 2
22
Correct
Answers
What have we
learned about
the student’s
reading?
Written
Word(s)
Spoken
Word(s)
1
can
could
yes- first
letter only
yes
yes
2
too
that
no
yes
yes
3
can
could
yes- first
letter only
yes
yes
4
this
it
no
yes
yes
5
I’m
I am
yes
yes
yes
6
my
the
no
yes
yes
7
in
at
no
yes
no
8
As
While
no
yes
yes
9
were
was
yes- first
letter only
yes
yes
no
yes
yes
40 %
100 %
90 %
10
most of
they
them
Percentage
Graphophonetic Syntactic Semantic
23
What do the errors tell us?
Error Type
Percentage Interpretation
Graphophonetic 40%
Nearly half of these errors
preserved some sounds,
usually the first letter.
Syntactic
100%
All of these errors
preserved grammar.
90%
Most of these errors
preserved meaning.
Semantic
24
Instructional Recommendations
Practice short, functional words to help the student develop
fluency.
 Discriminate between similar words and phrases.
 Master common error words.
• Echo reading
• Writing or spelling exercises
25
Error and Skills Analysis in
Mathematics
26
Analyzing Computation Errors
 How wrong is a wrong answer?
 Evaluate each numeral in the answer to look for
patterns in correct and incorrect digits
 Further analyze student’s work when shown
27
Computation Scoring Review:
Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication
Score each correct digit in the answer from right to left.
Example: Correct answer is 417.
Student Answer Correct Digits
417
3
415
2
47
1
28
Scoring Review: Division
Score each correct digit in the answer from left to right, with
remainders scored from right to left.
#R#
Correct Answer
36 R 13
Student Answer
Correct Digits
37 R 1
1
26 R 23
2
29
Scoring Review: Decimals
Start at the decimal point and work outward in both
directions.
.
# #
Correct Answer
83.76
Student Answer
Correct Digits
8.6
0
84.7
2
30
Scoring Review: Fractions
Score correct digits in each part of problem (whole number,
numerator, denominator) from right to left then add for total
correct digits.
Correct
Student Correct
Answer
Answer
Digits
#
#
#
7
6
12
8
6
11
2
6
5
12
2
31
Jim’s Multi-digit Addition: Example 1
Correct Answer:
125
+ 93
218
Jim’s Answer:
125
+ 93
118
__
2 Correct Digits
(2 CD)
What does this answer tell us about Jim’s skills?
32
Jim’s Multi-digit Addition: Example 2
Correct Answer:
456
+ 19
475
Jim’s Answer:
456
+ 19
465
_ _
2 Correct Digits
(2 CD)
How did Jim do on this problem?
What instructional recommendations would you make?
33
Comparing Different Answers to the
Same Problem: Subtraction
What
might
Student B
know that
Student C
does not?
4507
4507
4507
−2146 −2146 −2146
2361
2461
2441
_ __ _
_
_
_ _ _
Student A:
4 CD
Student B:
3 CD
How might
your
instructional
decisions
differ for
these
students?
Student C:
2 CD
34
Martha’s Multiplication with Decimals
Correct Answer:
63.2
× .4
25.28
Martha’s Answer:
4 CD
63.2
× .4
252.8
0 CD
How would you help Martha?
35
Let’s Practice
 Score the correct digits in each student response to
complete the table on page 1 of the handout.
 Answer the questions on page 2 of the handout.
See handout:
Computation Error Analysis Practice.
36
Scoring Check: Items 1-3
Correct
Item
Answer
Student 1
Student 2
Answer CD Answer CD
1
4206
4196
2
4207
3
2
7164
7244
2
7264
3
3
81
18
0
82
1
37
Scoring Check: Items 4-6
Correct
Item
Answer
Student 1
Student 2
Answer CD Answer CD
4
5 1/3
4 4/6
0
4 4/3
1
5
27 R 2
27
2
21R2 2
6
8.2
7.12
0
7.2
1
38
What does this analysis tell us?
 Whose errors were more significant?
 What would be your instructional recommendations for
each student?
 What additional data would help plan instruction?
39
Item 1
Correct Answer:
3058
+ 1148
4206
Student 1:
Student 2:
3058
+ 1148
4196
3058
+ 1148
4207
What does Item 1 tell us about each student?
40
Item 2
Correct Answer:
7329
− 165
7164
Student 1:
7329
− 165
7244
Student 2:
7329
− 165
7264
41
Item 3
Correct Answer:
9
× 9
81
Student 1:
9
× 9
18
Student 2:
9
× 9
82
42
Item 4
Correct Answer:
Student 1:
Student 2:
2
2
1
1 + 3 = 5
3
3
3
2
2
4
1 + 3 =4
3
3
6
2
2
4
1 + 3 =4
3
3
3
43
Item 5
Correct Answer:
2
38
6
2
2
7 R 2
3
3
1
2
Student 1:
27
3 83
Student 2:
2 1 R 2
38 3
3
8 0
6
2
44
Item 6
Correct Answer:
3.9
+ 4.3
8.2
Student 1:
3.9
+ 4.3
7.12
Student 2:
3.9
+ 4.3
7.2
45
What could additional data tell us?
 Is this error type consistent?
 Why does the student make type of error?
46
Instructional Targets
Student 1
Both
Student 2
• Regrouping
strategies
• Adding
fractions
• Decimal place
values
• Multiplication
• Division with
remainders
• Checking work
to make sure
answers make
sense
• Basic facts
accuracy
• Consistency in
regrouping
• Reducing
mixed
fractions
47
Instructional Recommendations
 Explicit instruction in
• Consistent error types
• Underlying skills (e.g., single digit computation)
 Additional practice with
• Corrective feedback
• Varied response formats
48
In Summary
Miscue
Analysis
Identified
Student
Needs
Individualized
Intervention
49
Disclaimer
This module was produced under the U.S. Department of
Education, Office of Special Education Programs, Award No.
H326Q110005. Celia Rosenquist serves as the project
officer.
The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the
positions or polices of the U.S. Department of Education. No
official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of
any product, commodity, service or enterprise mentioned in
this website is intended or should be inferred.
50
National Center on Intensive Intervention
1000 Thomas Jefferson Street NW
Washington, DC 20007-3835
866-577-5787
www.intensiveintervention.org
[email protected]
51

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