PBIS District Leadership Teams - Missouri Schoolwide Positive

Report
PBIS District Leadership Teams:
Building Capacity to Support
Training and Coaching
SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT PBIS
LISA POWERS, AREA COORDINATOR PLANNING
& DEVELOPMENT
BRIDGET THOMAS, PBIS FACILITATOR
LYNN YOKOYAMA, PBIS DATA SPECIALIST
Pay It Forward with SW-PBS for School Success
8th Annual MO SW-PBS Summer Training Institute, 2013
We would like to thank…
Dr. Kathleen Lane
Professor of Special Education,
University of Kansas
Center for SW-PBS
College of Education
University of Missouri
Dr. Lucille Eber
Illinois PBIS Network Director
Dr. Joanne Malloy
Assistant Clinical Professor,
University of New Hampshire
PBIS Mission Statement
2013
PBIS Team Mission: The SSD Positive Behavioral
Interventions and Support (PBIS) Team partners
with district and school level teams in developing,
implementing, and sustaining a culturally relevant
multi-tiered model of prevention and intervention
for the academic, behavioral and social-emotional
success of all students and their families.
Today’s Meet
 Go to http://todaysmeet.com/capacity
 Share your thoughts and questions throughout the
presentation
 Presentation available at
http://pbiscompendium.ssd.k12.mo.us/
Introductions: “That’s Me”
 Roles

Teachers

Administrators




Superintendents/Assist
Directors
Principals/Assist.
Clinicians/Specialists




School Psych.
Social Worker
Counselor
Behavior specialist

Family member

Researcher/Instructor

Currently on a DLT

Currently a DLT
Coordinator/Leader
Objectives
 Understanding how to maintain and sustain PBIS
practices by using the Blueprint and Action Planning
 Know and be able to utilize available resources to
develop a plan focused on Tier 2/3
 Leverage available resources and structures and
identify roles and responsibilities to have the
capability and capacity to implement a multi-tiered
system across all three tiers
By the end of this session you will be able to …
 Identify potential resources within your district to
build capacity to implement a multi-tiered system
 Identify and describe possible next steps for your
district
What would you like to walk away with
from this session?
Session’s Agenda
 Why build district
support for Tier 2/3?
 School-wide
Implementation
Blueprint


Training
Coaching
Evaluation
 Resources
 Possible Next Steps
Tariq’s Story
http://www.whocaresaboutkelsey.com/multimedia
 What might have helped Tariq?
 How does your district support students
who might benefit from advanced supports?
SWPBS Implementation Blueprint
Funding
Visibility
www.pbis.org
Political
Support
2010
Policy
LEADERSHIP TEAM
(Coordination)
Training
Coaching
Evaluation
Local School/District Implementation
Demonstrations
Behavioral
Expertise
Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tier Model of Prevention
(Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies, 2009)
Goal: Reduce Harm
Specialized Individual Systems
for Students with High-Risk
≈
Tertiary Prevention
(Tier 3)
≈
Secondary Prevention (Tier 2)
Goal: Reverse Harm
Specialized Group Systems
for Students At-Risk
PBIS Framework
Goal: Prevent Harm
School/Classroom-Wide Systems for
All Students, Staff, & Settings
≈
Primary Prevention (Tier 1)
Academic
Behavioral
Positive Action;
Social Skills
Improvement
System
Social
Stages of Implementation
Focus
Should we
do it!
Stage
Description
Exploration/
Adoption
Decision regarding commitment to adopting
the program/practices and supporting
successful implementation.
Installation
Set up infrastructure so that successful
implementation can take place and be
supported. Establish team and data
systems, conduct audit, develop plan.
Initial
Implementation
Try out the practices, work out details, learn
and improve before expanding to other
contexts.
Elaboration
Expand the program/practices to other
locations, individuals, times- adjust from
learning in initial implementation.
Continuous
Improvement/
Regeneration
Make it easier, more efficient. Embed within
current practices.
Work to do
it right!
Work to do
it better!
Setbacks may move us back to the previous stage
Ignore
Survive theFileAwkward Stage: An
analogy Snow
Day!
Grievance
Data
Vote
coach
off
Have a
“AHA!”
Change
Practice
Violate
Norms
Dominate
conversation
Late for
meeting
“We
already
do that.”
Ignore
e-mails
Prep for
Meeting
Go to a
PLC
Today is a
book
study?
Apply for
PBIS
Attend
District PD
New
District
Initiative
from Bruce Smith, ViiM
Be on
time
Go to
Book
Study
Fundamental Aspects of Professional
Development
 Fidelity of Implementation
 Desirable Student Outcomes
Basic Steps to the Development of Professional
Development Plans and Process
 Self-assessment of District




Implementation
Self-assessment of current
Professional Development
Capacity
Professional Development
Plan focusing on SWPBS
Linkage of SWPBS
Professional Development
to District Improvement
Plan
Evaluation Plan
Training Capacity/Professional
Development
 Priority for identification & adoption of evidence-
based training curriculum & professional
development practices.
 Plan for local training capacity to build & sustain
SWPBS practices.
 Plan for continuous regeneration & updating of
training capacity.
Blueprint Features
Training Capacity
Goal(s)
Actions
Person(
s)
Respon
sible
Resources Needed
Timeline/Status
A=Achieved/Maintained, I=In
Progress, or N=Not Started
Evaluation/Outcome (Data
Sources)
 Post examples of training capacity from an action
plan
1.Tier 3 training in 1.Continued PD Team
process for all as needed per
schools who have school
completed T3 PL 2. Time
2.Training at
incorporated in
beginning of the schedule
year for all schools 3. School
3. Mentor program Teams and Liz
for new teachers will support
into the building 4. schools to
Online Classroom develop a
Modules
5. process for
Training
Counselors to
new teachers
attend PBIS and 4. Staff
make connections meetings
with PBIS and care 5.Invited C & I
teams 6. Invite C to DLT
and I to principle's 6. How are
DLT to discuss PD 7. schools
Provide new teacher supporting new
training
teachers…Liz
7. Counselors
to participate
in PL
Oct.
1. PD
2.- 3.
Time allotted
4.
Present at monthly
meetings
1. I
2. I
3. I
4. I
Dec.
1. I
2. A
3. I
4. I
5. I
6.A
7. I
March
May
Turn and Talk
 How does your district’s training plan match the
concepts outlined?
 How does your district’s training plan differ from
the concepts outlined?
Using data to connect students
with Tier 2 and 3 supports
H O W C A N I N F O R M A TI O N F R O M
B E H A V I O R A L A N D A C A DEM I C
SC R E E N I N G TO O L S B E USED TO
S UP P O R T STUDEN TS?
Behavior Screening Tools
 Serve as a screening practice for identifying students who
may require additional supports.
Early Screening Project (ESP; Walker, Severson, & Feil,1994)
 Social Skills Improvement System: Performance Screening
Guide (SSiS; Elliott & Gresham, 2007)
 BASC2 Behavioral and Emotional Screening System (BESS;
Kamphaus & Reynolds, 2007)
 Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ; Goodman,
1997)
 Student Risk Screening Scale (SRSS; Drummond,1994)
 Systematic Screener for Behavior Disorders (SSBD; Walker &
Severson, 1992)

Measure
Early Screening
Project
Authors
Ordering Information
Walker, Severson, & Feil Available for purchase
(1994)
from Sopris West
Systematic Screening
Walker & Severson
for Behavior Disorders (1992)
Student Risk Screening
Scale
Strengths and
Difficulties
Questionnaire
Behavior and
Emotional Screening
System
Social Skills
Improvement System:
Performance Screening
Guide
Drummond (1994)
Available for purchase
from Cambium Learning/
Sopris West
Free
Goodman (1991)
Free online at
http://www.sdqinfo.com/
Kamphaus & Reynolds
(2007)
Available for purchase
from Pearson/ PsychCorp
Elliott & Gresham,
(2007)
Available for purchase
from Pearson/ PsychCorp
What is the SRSS?
 The SRSS is 7-item mass screener used to identify
students who are at risk for antisocial behavior.
 Teachers evaluate each student on the following items
- Steal
- Lie, Cheat, Sneak
- Behavior Problems
- Peer Rejection
-Low Academic Achievement
-Negative Attitude
-Aggressive Behavior
 Student Risk is divided into 3 categories
-
Low
Moderate
High
0–3
4–8
9+
(SRSS; Drummond, 1994)
INCREDIBLE!
PBS –
That’s the ticket!
SRSS Data Over Time
Fall Comparison
Percentage of Students
100%
6.00%
3.00%
3.00%
11.00%
11.00%
2.34%
7.87%
0.63%
n=3
6.29%
n = 30
17.00%
80%
n = 444
60%
40%
86.00%
86.00%
89.79%
93.08%
High
Moderate
Low
77.00%
20%
0%
Fall 2004
Fall 2005
Fall 2006
Fall 2007
Fall 2008
These numbers are
based on the total
number of students
screened. 6 students
were not screened.
(Fall 2008)
Questions to Consider Before Instituting
Behavior Screenings as Part of Regular School
Practices?
 When to do them?
 Who should prepare them?
 Who should administer them?
 Who completes them?
 Who should score them?
 When and how should the results be shared?
 What are our district policies regarding systematic
screenings?
 What researched based interventions are available to
students at possible risks?
Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tier Model of Prevention
(Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies, 2009)
Goal: Reduce Harm
Specialized Individual Systems
for Students with High-Risk
≈
Tertiary Prevention (Tier 3)
≈
Secondary Prevention (Tier 2)
Goal: Reverse Harm
Specialized Group Systems
for Students At-Risk
PBIS Framework
Goal: Prevent Harm
School/Classroom-Wide Systems for
All Students, Staff, & Settings
≈
Primary Prevention (Tier 1)
Academic
Behavioral
Social Skills
Improvement System
(SSiS) - Classwide
Intervention Program
Social
3-Tiered System of Support
Necessary Conversations (Teams)
Universal
Team
Plans SW &
Class-wide
supports
Universal
Support
Secondary
Systems Team
Problem Solving
Team
Tertiary Systems
Team
Uses Process data;
determines overall
intervention
effectiveness
Standing team; uses
FBA/BIP process for
one youth at a time
Uses Process data;
determines overall
intervention
effectiveness
CICO
Social Skills
Behavior Contracts
Self-Management
Newcomers
Club/Mentors
Study/
Organizational Skills
Academic
Problem
Solving
with
function
in mind
Complex
FABI
Problem solving
SSD PBIS Adapted from : Eber, L. T301fi: Tertiary Level Support and Data-based Decision-making in Wraparound [Presentation Slide].
Retrieved from Tier 3/Tertiary Series Training Resource Guide (2010). Illinois PBIS Network
WRAP
RENEW
Tier 2/3 Evaluation: BAT Scales & Subscales
 Tier 1 Implementation of SW-PBS
 Tier 2 and 3 Foundations
 Commitment
 Student Identification
 Monitoring & Evaluation
 Tier 2 Targeted Interventions
 Tier 2 Support System
 Main Tier 2 Strategy Implementation
 Main Tier 2 Strategy Monitoring & Evaluation
 Tier 3 Intensive Interventions
 Tier 3 Support System
 Tier 3 Assessment & Plan Development
 Tier 3 Monitoring & Evaluation
We Teach a Systematic Approach to Designing
a Secondary Intervention Plan
 Step 1: Construct your assessment schedule
 Step 2: Identify your secondary supports
 Existing and new interventions
 Step 3: Determine entry criteria
 Nomination, academic failure, etc.
 Step 4: Identify outcome measures
 Pre and post tests, CBM, etc.
 Step 5: Identify exit criteria
 Reduction of discipline contacts, academic success, etc.
 Step 6: Consider additional needs
Procedures for Monitoring: Assessment Schedule
Aug
Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
School Demographics
*Student Demographics
Student Outcome Academic Measures
Report Card (MS/HS)
*GPA
*Course Failures
Student Outcome Behavior Measures
*SRSS - Screener
X
X
X
Discipline *ODR
X
X
*Attendance (Tardies/
Unexcused Absences)
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Referrals
SPED and S-TEAM
Program Measures
For Consented Teachers Only
*Social Validity (PIRS)
*SET/Treatment Integrity
(TI) Interval
*TI -Observations
X
X
X
X
X
X
A Systematic Approach to Designing a
Secondary Intervention Plan
 Step 1: Construct your assessment schedule
 Step 2: Identify your secondary supports
 Existing and new interventions
 Step 3: Determine entry criteria
 Nomination, academic failure, etc.
 Step 4: Identify outcome measures
 Pre and post tests, CBM, etc.
 Step 5: Identify exit criteria
 Reduction of discipline contacts, academic success, etc.
 Step 6: Consider additional needs
Secondary Intervention Grid
Support
Description
School-wide
Data:
Entry Criteria
Data to Monitor
Progress
Exit Criteria
Sample Secondary Intervention Grid: Middle School
Support
Description
Check,
This program involves
Connect,
checking in with a
and Expect mentor at the
beginning and end of
the day to receive a
performance goal for
the day.
Behavior
Contract
A written agreement
between two parties
used to specify the
contingent relationship
between the completion
of a behavior and access
to or delivery of a
specific reward.
Contract may involve
administrator, teacher,
parent, and student.
Schoolwide
Data: Entry
Criteria
Data to
Monitor
Progress
Exit Criteria
Behavior: SRSS
Daily BEP
Moderate or High Progress
Risk on screening Reports
Academic:
overall GPA <
2.5 or 2 or more
course failures at
any report card
Students who have
met there goal
consistently for 3
weeks will move to
the self-monitoring
phase.
Behavior: SRSS mod to high risk
Academic: 2 or
more missing
assignments with
in a grading
period
Successful
Completion of
behavior contract
Work
completion,
or other
behavior
addressed in
contract
Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tier Model of Prevention
(Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies, 2009)
Goal: Reduce Harm
Specialized Individual Systems
for Students with High-Risk
≈
Tertiary Prevention (Tier 3)
≈
Secondary Prevention (Tier 2)
Goal: Reverse Harm
Specialized Group Systems
for Students At-Risk
PBIS Framework
Goal: Prevent Harm
School/Classroom-Wide Systems for
All Students, Staff, & Settings
≈
Primary Prevention (Tier 1)
Academic
Behavioral
Social Skills
Improvement System
(SSiS) - Classwide
Intervention Program
Social
Tertiary Intervention Grid
Support
Description
School-wide
Data:
Entry Criteria
Data to Monitor
Progress
Exit Criteria
Sample Tertiary Intervention Grid
Support
Description
Functional
Assessment
-Based
Intervention
Individualized
interventions
developed by
the behavior
specialist and
PBS team
School-wide Data:
Entry Criteria
Data to Monitor
Progress
Students who:
Data will be collected
Behavior
on both the (a)
scored in the high risk
target (problem)
category on the Student Risk
behavior and (b)
Screening Scale (SRSS), or
replacement
scored in the clinical range on
(desirable)
one following Strengths and
behavior
Difficulties (SDQ) subscales:
identified by the
Emotional Symptoms,
team on an onConduct Problems,
going basis.
Hyperactivity, or Prosocial
Weekly teacher
Behavior,
report on
earned more than 5 office
academic status
discipline referrals (ODR) for ODR data collected
major events during a
weekly
grading period
or Academic
identified at highest risk for
school failure: recommended
for retention; or scored far
below basic on state-wide or
district-wide assessments
State of Tennessee DOE Technical Assistance
Grant IRB # 090935
Exit Criteria
The functionbased
intervention will
be faded once a
functional
relation is
demonstrated
using a validated
single case
methodology
design (e.g.,
withdrawal
design) and the
behavioral
objectives
specified in the
plan are met.
We offer ongoing professional development to
school-site teams to learn how to design,
implement, and evaluate functional
assessment-based interventions using a
systematic model developed by Umbreit and
colleagues.
Overview of FABIs
Functional Assessment
Interviews (Teacher, Parent, Student)
Records Review
Rating Scales (SSiS, Parent and Teacher)
A-B-C Data Collection
Intervention Development - A-R-E
Function Matrix
Function-based Decision Model
Testing the Intervention
Data Collection Across all phases of
the design
Treatment Integrity
Social Validity
Figure 1. Integrating Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support and Culturally Responsive Practices.
How might your district plan ensure cultural
competence and engaging families as part
of building training and coaching capacity
for Tier 2/3?
Coaching Capacity
 Coaching network that establishes & sustains
SWPBS
 Individuals for coaching & facilitation supports at
least monthly with each emerging school teams (in
training & not at implementation criteria), & at least
quarterly with established teams
 Coaching functions for internal (school level) &
external (district/regional level) coaching.
Coaching Capacity
Blueprint Features
 Post examples of coaching capacity from an action
plan
Goal(s)
Actions
Person(s)
Responsible
Resources
Needed
Timeline/Status A=Achieved/Maintained,
I=In Progress, or N=Not Started
Oct.
Coaching
1. to have a 1. Identify
1. DLT
coaches
coaches in
2. Behavior
network
district,
Specialist
matched to 3. Behavior
2. Build
skillset
Specialist
support for identifed in
along
coaches
Training and
with
PD Blueprint
DLT/coac
3. Yearly
hes
calendar for 2. Monthly
coaches
meeting for
coaches
3. Build
coaches
calendar
Dec.
March
May
Evaluation/Outcome
(Data Sources)
Lessons Learned from Schools to Inform District
Planning Tier 2/3
 Universals implemented with fidelity are important
to support Tier 2…as well as Tier 3
 Behavior Expertise for higher level Tier 2 and Tier 3
interventions. Look for other resources to implement
lower level Tier 2 interventions such as CICO
 Assess current practices … which teams can be
combined? What teams can naturally incorporate
Tier 3 responsibilities?
 Students who are receiving Tier 3 interventions
should also have access to Tier 1 and Tier 2 Tier 2
Lessons Learned From District Leadership Teams
 Districts are building coaching capacity with existing





resources
Development of a Tier 2/3 sub-committee at the district
level is essential for planning
Restructuring and allocation of resources for advanced
supports
Collaboration and maximizing resources between general
education and special education
District Leadership Teams benefit from cabinet
leadership
Analyzing visual data at the district level is essential to
support planning
Turn and Talk
 How does your district’s coaching content match
the concepts outlined?
 How does your district’s coaching content differ
from the concepts outlined?
Evaluation Capacity
 An evaluation process & schedule for assessing (a) extent to




which teams are using SWPBS (b) impact of SW PBS on
student outcomes, & (c) extent to which the leadership team’s
action plan is implemented
School-based data information systems (e.g., data collection
tools& evaluation processes)
District &/or state level procedures & supports for system
level evaluation
Dissemination of annual report of implementation integrity &
outcomes
At least quarterly dissemination, celebration, and
acknowledgement of outcomes and accomplishments.
Social Validity for an Intervention
 Obtaining participants’ (Teachers, Students,
Families) perceptions of the goals, procedures
and outcomes of the intervention to ensure they
can comfortably support implementation.
Lane, Kathleen Lynne, Menzies, Holly M., Bruhn, Allis L., and Crnobori, M. Managing Challenging Behaviors in Schools:
Research-Based Strategies that Work. The Guilford Press, 2011.
Social Validity
 Social Significance – will this intervention improve
the student’s quality of life? GOAL
 Social acceptability –Do all agree that the
intervention is necessary, appropriate, supports
positive outcomes, minimally disruptive and worth the
effort to attain the goal? PROCEDURES
 Social importance –Does this intervention have the
potential to produce socially important OUTCOMES?
Lane, Kathleen Lynne, and Beebe-Frankenberger, M. School-Based Interventions: The Tools you Need to Succeed. Pearson
Education, Inc., 2004.
With Whom Do We Assess Social Validity?
 Teachers- have view that intervention is socially
valid more likely that intervention steps are
implemented as designed
 Parent- provide vital information about how an
intervention can benefit or impede their child
 Student- helps to measure buy-in of intervention
and promotes student voice
1. CICO is an acceptable intervention for
our school.
2. CICO is appropriate to meet the selected
students behavioral needs.
3. CICO will help produce the desired
outcomes for students.
4. CICO will be easy to implement.
Collins, 2010, Adapted from SCHOOL-BASED INTERVENTIONS The
tools You Need to Succeed. Kathleen Lynne Lane and Margaret BeebeFrankenberger. Copyright 2--4 Pearson Education, Inc.
Strongly
Disagree
Disagree
Slightly
Disagree
Slightly
Agree
Agree
Strongly
Agree
Pre- Social
Validity Statement
1
2
3
4
5
6
Treatment Integrity
 Definition: The degree to which intervention
procedures are implemented as intended
 Failure to implement intervention with integrity
threatens internal and external validity of treatment


Internal: how well the intervention worked in the current situation
External: how well the intervention might work in other situations
 Treatment fidelity is often assumed, rather than
assessed

If behavior changes do not result after a given intervention, and
integrity was not monitored, it is difficult to determine if failure
was due to an ineffective treatment, or an effective treatment plan
was implemented with poor fidelity
Factors Related to Treatment Fidelity
 Complexity of the intervention
 Tactics are consistent acceptable for stakeholders
 Implementation time required
 Materials and resources required
 Perceived and actual effectiveness
Assessing Treatment Fidelity
 Direct Systematic Observation
 Self-reporting
 Rating Scales
 Permanent Product
Treatment Integrity
 Monitor the extent to which interventions are
implemented as planned, so that the school staff
can be confident that the improvements they
see are a result of the intervention (treatment
integrity; Gresham, 1989).
 When intended results do not occur, is it due to
insufficient implementation or low treatment
integrity?
Student and Systems Tracking Tool (SSTT)
Tier 2 Interventions Summary: School Snapshot
Tier 2 Interventions Summary - Student Response Chart 3
Students with IEP vs. Students w/o IEP
18
16
Number of Students
14
3
5
12
5
10
4
Students with IEP Not Responding
0
Students with IEP Responding
Students w/o IEP Not Responding
8
6
4
2
0
Students w/o IEP Responding
3
1
0
4
0
AUG
4
0
SEP
12
0
0
0
4
OCT
4
NOV
5
DEC
11
9
0 8
5
0
6
10
0
6
4
JAN
FEB
MAR
0 0
APR
0 0
MAY
0 0
JUN
0 0
JUL
Recommended Text
Post Organizer: Preview & Cue Use
 Invite your PBIS Consultant to
support building capacity within
your district.
 Discuss how to use the features
of PBIS Implementation
Blueprint to build capacity
within your district.
Our Next Steps
 Use the 2010 PBIS Intervention Blueprint & Self



Assessment
Help DLTs use Data at each meeting
Local Calendar includes PBIS Evaluation Plan &
Professional Development
Assist DLTs to Improve communication to & from
schools
Plan for building capacity at all three tiers

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