Reading Implementation Day 2 & 3

Report
Kansas Multi-Tier System of Supports
Reading Implementation-Garden City
Today’s Agenda
• Review Reading Implementation Steps 1 – 9
using new data from the most recent Universal
Screening
• Building Leadership Team Implementation
Guide for Reading Steps 9 – 18: Progress
Monitoring Students in Interventions
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Step 1: Review and Validate Universal
Screening Data
• Discuss as a team:
How is universal screening data being
reviewed and validated?
• Remember, if you have questions about the
validity of any student’s scores, then re-screen
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Step 2:Analyze
Building Level Data
Locate building level reports (AIMSweb: Tier
Transition Report or DIBELS: Distribution Report)
will provide percentage and numbers of students
falling at Benchmark or Tier 1 (25th percentile and
above), at Strategic or Tier 2 (10th – 24th
percentile), and the Intensive or Tier 3 range (9th
percentile and below).
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AIMSweb Tier Transition Report
Curriculum Based Measurement
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Tier Transition Report
MAZE-Comprehension
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AIMSweb Grade Level Assessments to
Include for Composite Score
Grade
Fall
Winter
Spring
Kdg
LNF
LNF, LSF, PSF,
NWF
LNF, LSF, PSF,
NWF
1st
LNF, LSF, PSF,
NWF
PSF, NWF,
R-CBM
NWF, R-CBM
2nd
R-CBM
R-CBM
R-CBM
R-CBM, Maze
R-CBM, Maze
R-CBM, Maze
Maze
Maze
3rd-6th
7th-High
Maze
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School
Building Level Status
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Step 3: Analyze Grade Level Data
 Use grade level reports
 AIMSweb: Distribution by Scores & Percentiles
(Well Above Average, Above Average, Average,
Below Average, & Well Below Average)
(Rainbow Report with target score)
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Step 3: Analyze Grade Level Data
1. Analyze the screening data for each grade level in
the building and add it to the appropriate Grade
Level Status worksheet
2. Compare this universal screening data to the
previous screening data and answer the following
questions:
1. What is our current Grade Level status?
2. Are we on track to meet our goal?
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Grade Level Status for each Measurement
Question: What is our current grade level status and
end of the year goal?
%
Benchmark/
Target and
above
%
%
Supplemental Intensive/Well
/Below
Below
Average
Average
%
Below Target
(Differentiation)
Fall
Winter
Spring
Grade Goal:
By
Spring, we want ___% to be at benchmark with their literacy skills.
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Step 4: Analyze classroom level data
1. Find the classroom level report
2. Analyze the screening data for at least one
classroom in the building and add it to the
Classroom Level Status worksheet for that
classroom.
3. After evaluating the classroom level data and its
implications, teams need to answer the following
questions:
• What is the current Classroom Level status?
• Is this classroom on track to meet the goal?
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As collaborative teams evaluate classroom level
data, here are issues that should be discussed
and, if needed, reported to the leadership team
1. What do the strengths/needs of each class make us
think about for differentiation?
2. Are core instructional practices and the core
curriculum being implemented with fidelity?
3. Do staff have professional development or other
needs?
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Step 5: Use New Screening Data to Revise How
Students are Sorted into Groups.
• Have any issues come up in your building regarding
sorting students into the four Groups?
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Grouping Worksheet
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AIMSweb Grouping Indicators
Kdg
Fall
1st Grade
LNF
Step 1: NWF
PAST: Initial Phoneme, Step 2: PSF
2nd- 6th
Grade
7th – 8th
Grade
R-CBM
Maze
Syllable Blending,
Segmentation, &
Deletion , Word
Concept
Alphabet Knowledge
Winter
PSF
NWF
R-CBM
Maze
Spring
PSF
R-CBM
R-CBM
Maze
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Phoneme Segmentation
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Grouping for Phoneme Segmentation
Fluency (PSF)
1. Locate Class Distribution Report
2. Identify students needing strategic and
intensive instructional services
3. Review the students’ PSF assessment and
determine accuracy percentage by dividing
the student’s score by the number
attempted.
4. Place into groups
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Phoneme Segmentation Grouping Summary
Group 1: Accurate and Fluent
Group 2: Accurate but Slow
• Student segments all phonemes including
phonemes in blends with good speed and
accuracy(more than 95% accuracy)
 Focus instruction on short vowels or CVC words
and progress monitor using Nonsense Word
Fluency
•Student segments all phonemes including
phonemes in blends with good accuracy(more
than 95% accuracy) but did not pass phoneme
segmentation fluency.
Focus instruction on automaticity or fluency.
Group 3: Inaccurate and Slow
Group 4: Inaccurate and Fluent
• Student attempts to segment sounds or word
parts, but is often incorrect. (less than 95%
accuracy)
•Initial phonemes
•Final phonemes
•Vowel phonemes
 Focus instruction on identifying specific
phonemes (initial, final, vowels)
•Student segments only partially with good
accuracy (more than 95% accuracy)
•Does not segment blends
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•Produces onset and rime
Focus instruction on teaching single phoneme
•Student segments sounds very quickly but
produces inaccurate sounds.
Teacher should cue the student to slow down and
retest.
Nonsense Word Fluency
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Grouping for Nonsense Word Fluency
(NWF)
1. Locate Class Distribution Report
2. Review the students NWF assessment and
determine pattern performance and accuracy
% by dividing the student’s score by the
number attempted.
3. Place into groups
4. Identify students needing strategic and
intensive instructional services
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Nonsense Word Fluency Grouping
Summary
Group 1: Whole Word Reading
(Unitization)
Accurate
Not Accurate
Group 2: Sound-by-Sound and Recoding
/t/ /o/ /b/ /tob/
Accurate
Focus instruction
on accuracy and
fluency in connected
text
Group 3: Partial Blends /t/ /ob/
Accurate
Not Accurate
 Focus instruction on
blending fluency
practice at the word level
Instruction in “reading the
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words
the fast way”
Not Accurate
 Focus on accuracy
instruction at the
letter-sound level and
then accuracy instruction
at the blending level
Group 4: Decoding Sound-by-Sound
/t/ /o/ /b/
.Accurate

Not Accurate
Focus instruction
on accuracy
instruction at the
letter-sound level
Oral Reading Fluency
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Grouping for Grades 7-8
• All students are given grade level Maze
passages
• Students not passing grade level Maze are
given Oral Reading Fluency passages at their
grade level
Kdg
1st
Grade
2nd- 6th
Grade
7th – 8th
Grade
AK or
PAST:IS
PSF or
NWF
ORF
Maze
Winter
LSF
NWF
ORF
Maze
Spring
PSF
ORF
ORF
Maze
Fall
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Grouping is a Multi-Step Process
Grades 9-12
• Students in grades 9-12 are given a grade level
comprehension assessment
• Students who do not pass the grade level
comprehension assessment are given an 8th
grade Maze
• Students not passing 8th grade Maze are given 8th
grade level Oral Reading Fluency passages
• Determine accuracy and fluency
• Determine instructional focus
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Step 6: Determine what Additional
Information is Needed and Complete
Diagnostic Process
• Discuss any issues in your building related to
completing the diagnostic process with students.
• Does any further training of collaborative teams need
to occur?
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Diagnostic Process for Oral Reading
Fluency
Once the initial instructional sort has been completed,
the diagnostic process is started.
• Students in Group 3 on the Oral Reading Fluency
Grouping Sort should be given either a phonological
awareness assessment (PAST), phonics assessment
(QPS), or both to determine a student’s instructional
need. These assessments are based on skill
continuums.
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Grouping Worksheet
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QPS Information
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Grouping by Phonics Continuum
Use Phonics Grouping Worksheet
Student
Letter
Names
Letter
Sounds
VC/CVC
Digraphs
Blends
Silent e
RControlled
Vowels
Danny
26
26
10
7
6
5
9
Troy
26
26
7
6
9
7
5
Jenny
26
26
6
6
7
6
5
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Do the data indicate the need to
implement a class-wide intervention?
If more than 40% of the class need the same
intervention then a class-wide intervention is
needed.
Q: What is considered a class-wide intervention?
A: One example would be providing a protocol
intervention to the entire class.
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Step 7: Determine Instructional Focus for
Each Student and Finalize Instructional
Groupings
• Have any issues come up in your building
related to determining the instructional focus
for each student and finalizing instructional
groups?
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Considerations for Finalizing Groups
• Keep group sizes small
– Supplemental: Small group instruction with group
size depending on age level and materials being
used; generally no more than about 3-5 students
– Intensive: group size of 1-3 students
• Base small groups on instructional need
• Consider attitudes, behaviors, and motivation of
each student
• Monitor the progress of high risk students more
frequently
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Considerations for Finalizing Homogeneous
Intervention Groups
Supplemental:
– (K-6)an additional 30 minutes of targeted instruction
should be provided beyond the core with groups of 3-5
students
– (4-12) groups as large as 10 to 16 students for 30-50
minutes per day or one class period.
Intensive:
– (K-6) No more than 1-3 students for 60 additional
minutes
– (middle school) 1 to 4 students
– (high school) 1- 5 students
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Step 8: Determine Appropriate Instructional
Materials to Be Used For Each Instructional Grouping
• Read Building Leadership Team Work for
Implementation Step 8 (pg. 26-30).
• Also read Collaborative Team Work (pg. 27).
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Elementary Curriculum Protocol
Example
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Intervention Log
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Reading Implementation Day 2
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Step 9: Review Frequency of Progress
Monitoring Data Collection and Review
• Read Building Leadership Team Work for
Step 9 (pgs. 31-32 ).
• Also read Collaborative Team Work for
Step 9 (pg. 31-32).
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Building Team Work
• Determine frequency of progress monitoring data
collection for Supplemental and Intensive
intervention,
• Determine how frequently collaborative teams
should meet to review the progress monitoring data.
• Review the decision rule (from Structuring) regarding
the number of data points needed to determine
whether student performance indicates that
adjustment to instruction may be appropriate.
• Conduct fidelity checks to make sure that the
collaborative teams are following the guidelines for
frequency of progress monitoring.
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Building Team Work (cont’d)
• Consider whether staff members have been
informed about the data point decision rules
of the system.
• Consider any needs for professional
development.
• Consider how staff and resources are currently
allocated to support instructional groups and
whether any changes in staff/resource
allocation are warranted.
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Planning to Train Collaborative Teams
• When you return home, you will need to train the
collaborative teams on the information you learn
today.
• A workbook of the implementation steps will be
provided for work with the collaborative teams.
• Think about issues related to progress monitoring
collection and review that you will need to present to
the collaborative teams. Are there issues that your
leadership team needs to be sure to discuss?
• Document these on the Action Plan
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Step 10: Identify Skills to be Progress
Monitored
• Read Building Leadership Team Work for
Step 10 (pgs. 34-35 ).
• Also read Collaborative Team Work for
Step 10 (pg. 44).
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Postponing Progress Monitoring
“By postponing progress monitoring you will
lose the data that motivates teachers to keep
going because progress monitoring
documents the improvements that students
are making.”
(Hall, 2011, p. 31)
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Progress Monitoring Does Matter
• Students whose teachers progress monitor
regularly and use the data to make
instructional decisions show more academic
progress than students whose teachers do not
progress monitor.
• Teachers' accuracy in judging student progress
increases when progress monitoring is used
consistently.
(Stecker & Fuchs, 2000)
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Why Is Progress Monitoring
Important?
• Research has demonstrated that when
teachers use progress monitoring for
instructional decision-making purposes:
– Students achieve more.
– Teacher decision-making improves.
– Students tend to be more aware of their
performance.
(Fuchs, Deno, Mirkin, 1984; Fuchs, Fuchs, Hamlett, & Ferguson, 1992; Stecker, Fuchs, & Fuchs, 2005)
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Pre-Post Testing is Not Progress
Monitoring
• Pre-Post Tests measure
– student growth within a specific program, or
– whether a student has mastered specific skills
• Progress Monitoring measures
– whether growth is occurring on critical skills
– whether sufficient growth is occurring for
students to close the gap
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Grouping Worksheet
MAZE
NWF
R-CBM
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R-CBM
Matching Progress Monitoring to
Instructional Focus
Focus of Instruction
Alphabet Knowledge
Initial Phoneme Isolation
Onset/Rime
Phoneme Segmentation
Short Vowels
Accuracy
(Advanced Phonics)
Fluency
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Comprehension
Progress Monitor
Letter Naming Fluency
First Sound Fluency
Phoneme Segmentation Fluency
Nonsense Word Fluency
Oral Reading Fluency Passages/RCBM (Accuracy percent)
Oral Reading Fluency Passage
(wcpm)/R-CBM
Daze/Maze
Building Team Work
• Support the collaborative teams in their work,
• Check to make sure that students in intervention are being
monitored on the correct skill,
• Ensure correct progress monitoring measures are being
used
• Consider the current distribution of building resources and
whether those resources need to be distributed differently,
• Identify and plan for needed professional development, and
• Consider any issues reported to the leadership team by the
collaborative teams.
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Planning to Train Collaborative Teams
• When you return home, you will need to train the
collaborative teams on the information you learn today.
• A workbook of the implementation steps will be provided
for work with the collaborative teams.
• Think about issues related to identifying skills to be
progress monitored that you will need to present to the
collaborative teams. Are there issues that your
leadership team needs to be sure to discuss?
• Document these on the Action Plan
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Step 11: Determine the Instructional
Level for Off Grade Level Progress
Monitoring
• Read both sections of Step 11 (pg. 36 ).
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Determine the Appropriate Level
of Progress Monitoring
• The appropriate level for progress
monitoring each student is the instructional
level determined for that student using the
backwards testing process
• A reminder: Only students in intervention
are progress monitored.
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Determining Instructional Level
• Collaborative teams will need to determine
instructional level for oral reading fluency using
the Oral Reading Fluency Instructional Grouping
Worksheet for the following students:
• students in Group 3 who have passed the
phonological awareness assessment (PAST) and
short vowels on the phonics assessment (QPS),
and
• students who need intensive support (highlighted
in red) in Group 2 (accurate & slow)
Determining Instructional Level
Use the following steps to determine instructional level of
oral reading fluency:
1. test down (using progress monitoring probes) one
grade level at a time.
2. find the level at which the student reaches the 25th
percentile for AIMSweb (forms included in
collaborative team workbooks)
3. use the norms for the grade level and the time of year
of testing, with 95% accuracy for 1st - 2nd grade and
98% accuracy for 3rd grade and above
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Determining Instructional Level
4. the student’s instructional level is one gradelevel higher
5. use the instructional level for instructional
materials and progress monitoring
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Activity: Determining Instructional
Level by Backward Testing
Step 1: Locate the Fall Example Backwards Testing Worksheet
Step 2: Locate the Grade Level Universal screening score and
accuracy percentage
Step 3: Test backwards using grade level progress monitoring
probes. Test backwards one grade level at a time until student
reaches a passing DIBELS or AIMSweb score and accuracy
percentage (label as independent level)
Step 4: Determine student’s instructional level which is one
Grade level higher (circle scores and label as instructional level)
Step 5: Use the instructional level for instructional materials and
progress monitoring
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Backward Testing Worksheet
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Building Team Work
• Conduct fidelity checks to make sure that the
collaborative teams are following the guidelines for
determining the level for progress monitoring,
• Consider whether staff have the needed materials
and know the procedures for maintaining an
intervention log,
• Consider any needs for professional development,
and
• Consider how staff and resources are currently
allocated to support instructional groups, and
whether any changes in staff/resource allocation are
warranted
Planning to Train Collaborative Teams
• When you return home, you will need to train the
collaborative teams on the information you learn
today.
• A workbook of the implementation steps will be
provided for work with the collaborative teams.
• Think about issues related to determining
instructional level that you will need to present to the
collaborative teams. Are there issues that your
leadership team needs to be sure to discuss?
• Document these on the Action Plan
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Step 12: Review Progress Monitoring Data
•
•
•
•
The leadership team will be looking to make
sure:
the correct skill(s) were progress monitored at
the correct level,
that sufficient data have been collected to
make valid decisions, and
to determine if the data appear to have been
correctly graphed.
Read both sections of Step 12 (pg. 37-39)
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Building Team Work
• Were the directions for the administration of the
progress monitoring assessment followed exactly?
• Were the time limits for each test followed exactly?
• Was shadow scoring used to check scoring fidelity?
• Have all the staff who administer the progress
monitoring assessment been trained?
• Did collaborative teams verify the individual student
data?
• Have collaborative teams established and are they
following a routine for examining progress
monitoring graphs for accuracy?
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Building Team Work
• Conduct fidelity checks to make sure that the
collaborative teams are following the guidelines for
reviewing the progress monitoring data and applying
the decision rules correctly,
• Check to see if staff are charting the progress
monitoring data accurately,
• Check to see if periodic progress monitoring is
occurring for students that have exited supplemental
intervention in case a need re-emerges for additional
support, and
• Consider any needs for professional development.
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Frequency of Progress Monitoring
The recommended frequency of progress
monitoring within the MTSS framework is:
• every other week for students receiving
supplemental instruction and
• weekly for students receiving intensive
instruction.
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Documenting Student Progress
• Maintaining an intervention log is critical for
tracking student’s progress in intervention.
• Any changes to the intervention should be
based on the results of the progress
monitoring data, and documented.
• Documenting this information can be done
both on the progress monitoring graph and
the intervention log.
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Intervention Log
Monitor and Evaluate Progress:
Modify Instruction?
Whoops! Time to make an adjustment!
Lowered group size to 3 students
60
50
40
30
20
10
Dec.
Scores
Jan.
Scores
Feb.
Sc ores
Aimline
Ma r
ch
Scores
A
pril
Scores
May
Sc ore s
June
Scores
3-Point Decision Making Rule
Given at least 6 data points, examine the last 3
consecutive scores to determine instructional
success.
• If all 3 scores fall above the aim line and at or
above benchmark, decrease intervention
intensity or increase the goal
• If all 3 scores fall below the aim line, an
adjustment in instruction is recommended.
• If neither applies, keep collecting data until the 3
point rule can be applied.
3 consecutively above
3 consecutively below
not consecutively
above or below
If Students Have 3 or More Data Points
Consecutively Above The Aimline
• Regroup to work on new intervention skill
• Exit supplemental intervention and continue core
with periodic monitoring
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If Students Have 3 Or More Data Points
Consecutively Below The Aimline
Teams should consider the following questions:
• What needs to be adjusted?
• What have we learned works?
• What have we learned doesn’t work?
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Determine Instructional Adjustment
When data show that a student’s scores are below the
aimline, follow these steps to adjust the intervention:
1. Check what you are monitoring
2. Check fidelity of instruction
3. Increase pacing of instruction
4. Change pace of intervention
5. Ensure alignment of programs
6. Adjust the instructional materials
7. Move the student to a different group
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Determine If Progress Is Being
Achieved
Analysis of progress monitoring data is a twostep process:
1. determine if progress is being achieved
(slope), and
2. determine if the gap is closing (level).
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Closing the Achievement Gap
• Determine student’s instructional level
• Involve student in goal-setting and monitoring
• Increase difficulty of instructional level based
on positive progress monitoring results
• Continue monitoring after exiting intervention
to assure maintenance of skills
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Closing the Gap
• Progress monitor frequently at student’s
instructional level
• Involve student in goal-setting and monitoring
• Provide targeted interventions
– Accuracy, Fluency, Comprehension
• Increase difficulty of instructional level based on
positive progress monitoring results
• Continue monitoring after exiting intervention to
assure maintenance of skills
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Planning to Train Collaborative Teams
• When you return home, you will need to train
the collaborative teams on the information you
learn today.
• Think about issues related to reviewing
progress monitoring data that you will need to
present to the collaborative teams. Are there
issues that your leadership team needs to be
sure to discuss?
• Document these on the Action Plan.
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Step 13: If Sufficient Progress – Continue
the Intervention
• Read both sections of Step 13(pg. 40).
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Positive Response
By Level And Slope
Growth in Performance and Growth Rate
benchmark
Tier 2 instruction
Tier 1 instruction
Shores & Chester,
Positive Response by Level and Slope
•Positive response by level and slope means
that the intervention is working for the student
and by continuing the intervention the student
should reach the benchmark goal by the end of
the year.
•The intervention should continue until the
student reaches the goal
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Planning to Train Collaborative Teams
• When you return home, you will need to train
the collaborative teams on the information you
learn today.
• Think about issues related to identifying a
positive response and determining when to
continue an intervention that you will need to
present to the collaborative teams. Are there
issues that your leadership team needs to be
sure to discuss?
• Document these on the Action Plan.
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Step 14: If Insufficient Progress- Intensify
the Intervention
• Read both sections of Step 14 (pg. 41).
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Positive Response
By Slope
Growth in Performance but Insufficient Growth Rate
benchmark
Tier 2 instruction
Tier 1 instruction
Shores & Chester,
Growth in Performance but
Insufficient Growth Rate?
Increase intensity of instruction by:
• increasing number of student responses in a minute
by reducing group size
• Increase number of questions and error corrections
student receives in a minute
• Increase scaffolding
• Provide more modeling (I Do and We Do)
• Increase number of repetition cycles on each skill
• Use more systematic curriculum (Hall, 2007)
Building Team Work
• Conduct fidelity checks to make sure that the
collaborative teams are following the guidelines for
reviewing the progress monitoring data and applying
the decision rules correctly,
• Ensure that instruction is being intensified for any
students not making sufficient growth,
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Building Team Work
• Check to see if staff are charting the progress
monitoring data accurately,
• Consider any needs for professional development,
and
• Consider how resources are currently allocated to
support instructional groups, and whether any
changes in resource allocation are warranted.
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Planning to Train
Collaborative Teams
• When you return home, you will need to train the
collaborative teams on the information you learn today.
• Think about issues related to intensifying instruction
that you will need to present to the collaborative teams.
Are there issues that your leadership team needs to be
sure to discuss?
• Document these on the Action Plan
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Step 15: What to Do If a Student is Not
Making Progress-Use Problem Solving to
Customize the Intervention
• Read both sections of Step 15(pg. 42-43).
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Research-Based Practices Regarding
Intervention Effectiveness
Instruction
Curriculum
•Fidelity of Instruction
•Modeling and guided practice prior to
independent practice (I Do, We Do, You Do)
•Explicit Teaching
•Opportunities to respond
•Sufficient questioning, check for
understandings
•Sufficient practice
•Appropriate match between learner and
intervention
•Appropriate rate of progress to reach goal
•Instructional focus based on diagnostic
process
•Variety of Interests
•Teaches skills to mastery
•Appropriate independent work activities
Setting
Individual
•Classroom routines/behavior
management support learning
•Appropriate person teaching the intervention
group
•Transitions
are short and brief
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•Academic learning time is high
•Motivation
•Task persistence
•Attendance
•Pattern of performance errors reflect skill
deficits
•Commitment to school
Non- Response
By Level And Slope
Lack of Growth in Performance and Insufficient Growth Rate
benchmark
Tier 2 instruction
Tier 1 instruction
Shores & Chester,
Lack of Growth in Performance and Insufficient
Growth Rate?
Steps to Customize the Intervention
1. Begin with intensive protocol intervention
2. Teach protocol intervention with fidelity
3. The team determines whether a revision to
the program is needed to boost the student’s
rate of improvement.
4. If so, an instructional feature, based on a
well researched instructional principle, is
added to the validated protocol.
Building Team Work
Building leadership team responsibilities for this
step are:
• Conduct fidelity checks to make sure that the
collaborative teams are following the guidelines
for reviewing the progress monitoring data and
applying the decision rules correctly and in
sequence,
• Review fidelity data of the protocol intervention
being used,
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Building Team Work
• Ensure teams are using the Research-Based Practices
sheet in problem solving to begin the customization
of intervention changing only one practice at a time,
• Review the intervention log to ensure group size and
time guidelines for supplemental and intensive
interventions are being followed,
• Consider any needs for professional development,
and
• Consider how resources are currently allocated to
support instructional groups, and whether any
changes in resource allocation are warranted
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Building Team Work
• Conduct fidelity checks to make sure that the
collaborative teams are following the guidelines for
reviewing the progress monitoring data and applying
the decision rules correctly,
• Ensure that instruction is being intensified for any
students not making sufficient growth,
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Building Team Work
• Check to see if staff are charting the progress
monitoring data accurately,
• Consider any needs for professional development,
and
• Consider how resources are currently allocated to
support instructional groups, and whether any
changes in resource allocation are warranted.
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Planning to Train
Collaborative Teams
• When you return home, you will need to train the
collaborative teams on the information you learn today.
• Think about issues related to customizing instruction
that you will need to present to the collaborative teams.
Are there issues that your leadership team needs to be
sure to discuss?
• Document these on the Action Plan
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Step 16: Determine the Short Term Goals
for Students not Making Progress
• Read both sections of Step 16 (pg. 44-45).
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Determine Goal to Close the Gap
• The goal for a student should be the end-ofyear benchmark (or the 25th percentile on
end-of-year norms) of the grade level at which
the student is being progress monitored.
• If the screening assessment being used does
not have norms, the Hasbrouck & Tindal
(2006) oral reading fluency norms can be
used.
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Expected Rate of WCPM Increase
by Week
Grade Level
Realistic Goals
Ambitious Goals
1
2.0
3.0
2
1.5
2.0
3
1.0
1.5
4
.85
1.1
5
.5
.8
6
.3
.65
Collaboration Log
Example of Setting a Short Term Goal
•
•
•
•
Fall target for 4th grade is 136 wcpm
Johnny, a 4th grade student is reading 70 wcpm in fall
End of year 25%ile goal for 4th grade 112wcpm
4th grade ambitious goals are 1.1 wcpm increase in a
week
• End of year goal: 36 weeks x 1.1=39.6 wcpm
• 70 wcpm + 39.6 wcpm increase = end of
year goal of 109.6 wcpm
• 3 week short term goal 70 + 3.3=73.3 wcpm
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Planning to Train
Collaborative Teams
• When you return home, you will need to train the
collaborative teams on the information you learn today.
• Think about issues related to setting short term goals
that you will need to present to the collaborative teams.
Are there issues that your leadership team needs to be
sure to discuss?
• Document these on the Action Plan
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Step 17: Determine if Student
Interventions are Working
• Read Building Leadership
Team/Collaborative Team work for Step
17 (pg. 46).
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Summary of Effectiveness/Impact
Report
Additional Assessment
Whenever students fail to make adequate
growth on progress monitoring assessments,
it may be an indication that additional
diagnostic assessment needs to be conducted
to obtain additional information about skill
weaknesses.
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Planning to Train
Collaborative Teams
• When you return home, you will need to train the
collaborative teams on the information you learn today.
• Think about issues related to determining if student
interventions are working that you will need to present
to the collaborative teams. Are there issues that your
leadership team needs to be sure to discuss?
• Document these on the Action Plan
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Step 18: Update Student
Intervention/Collaboration Logs
• Read both sections of Step 18 (pg. 47-48).
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Keep Logs and Charts Up-to-date
• Need an accurate record of interventions
• Need an accurate record of actual student
participation in intervention instruction
• Need an accurate record of progress
monitoring results
• Need on-going consistent regular data review
meetings with instructional adjustments made
according to decision rules
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Building Team Work
• Ensure that staff are keeping student intervention
logs (including student attendance) updated,
• Ensure that staff are charting the progress
monitoring data consistently and accurately,
• Ensure that data review meetings are being held as
scheduled,
• Ensure that decision rules are being followed,
• Conduct periodical reviews of the entire process with
staff to ensure fidelity, and
• Consider any needs for professional development.
Building Team Work
• Review records to ensure that the MTSS
process is not being used to delay or deny
appropriate referrals and/or requests for
initial evaluation for special education or
other entitlement services, and
• Consider how resources are currently
allocated to support instructional groups, and
whether any changes in resource allocation
are warranted.
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Planning to Train Collaborative Teams
• When you return home, you will need to train the
collaborative teams on the information you learned
today.
• Think about issues related to updating student
intervention/collaboration logs that you will need to
present to the collaborative teams. Are there issues
that your leadership team needs to be sure to
discuss?
• Document these on the Action Plan
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