PowerPoint Template - National Safety Council

Report
Safe Teen Driving
Inexperience
Support for this project was provided by the U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center
for Injury Prevention and Control, under contract number 200-2012-M-52649.
®
© 2013 National Safety Council
New Teen Driver Risks
When teens first earn their license
– New sense of freedom
– Very exciting time
– Very dangerous time
– 30 times more likely to be in a crash after
transition from supervised driving to
unsupervised driving.
– Only way to learn how to drive is to
actually drive
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Inexperience Leads to Mistakes
Contributing factors include:
Driver Error
– Accounts for majority of crashes
– In the first year following licensure, teens
have the highest risk of crash per mile
driven
– Teens have problems with roadway
scanning, judging gaps and identifying
potential hazards
© 2013 National Safety Council
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Night time Driving
– 40% of fatal crashes happen at night
– Most before midnight
– It is more challenging to drive in the dark
and teens are inexperienced
– Make sure your teen is fully rested before
driving
– Set a limit to not drive after 9pm without
an adult driver in the vehicle
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Young Passengers
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– For 16 & 17 year olds the risk of fatal
crash increases 44% with one young
passenger in the vehicle
– This risk doubles with two young
passengers and
– Risk quadruples with three or more young
passengers
– NSC recommends no teen passengers
– Many states ban teen passengers during
restricted license period
Speeding
– More than one third of all young male
driver fatalities involve speeding.
– Many crashes occur because the driver
was driving too fast for the situation
– Remind young drivers to follow speed
limits, and adjust speed for weather and
traffic conditions
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Impaired Driving
– Nearly one-fifth of 16 & 17 year olds killed
in crashes had been drinking
– One drink can impair a driver’s abilities
– It is illegal under age 21
– Remind young drivers to never drink and
drive!
© 2013 National Safety Council
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Seat Belts
– More than half of young drivers killed in
crashes were not wearing seat belts.
– Using a seat belt can reduce the risk of
death or serious injuries in a crash by
approximately 50%
– Require young drivers to buckle up on
every trip, no matter the distance
– The simplest way to prevent car crash
deaths is to buckle up!
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Distracted Driving
• Cell Phone Use
– 4 times more likely to be in a crash
– It doesn’t matter if hand-held or handsfree. Both are a crash risk!
• Texting
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– Most teen drivers admit to texting while
driving
– Texting while driving increases risk of a
crash by at least 8 times.
What Parents Can Do
– Supervise your teen driving on a variety of
roads at different times of day and in
varied weather and traffic conditions, even
after they have earned their license.
– Complete a parent-teen driver agreement
with your teen. One can be found at:
http://www.cdc.gov/ParentsAreTheKey/pdf
/Parent_Teen_Driving_Agreement-a.pdf
© 2013 National Safety Council
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Be a Good Role Model
• Parents and caregivers should practice
these suggestions as well
• This will reinforce the importance of
these messages with your teen
Support for this project was provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, under contract number
200-2012-M-52649.
© 2013 National Safety Council
11
Who is NSC?
Our Mission:
The National Safety Council saves lives
by preventing injuries and deaths at
work, in homes and communities,
and on the roads through leadership,
research, education and advocacy.
© 2013 National Safety Council
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