071713 webinar versionf

Report
MAXIMIZING FLEXIBILITY
IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF FEDERAL GRANTS
July 17, 2013
U.S. Department of Education
OVERVIEW
1. Purpose of Title I, Part A
2. Refresher on Schoolwide
Programs
3. Use of Funds for
Implementation of College
and Career Ready Standards
4. Questions
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U.S. Department of Education
TITLE I, PART A
Title I, Part A (Title I)
• Provides Supplemental Federal funds to ensure all
students have fair, equal, and significant opportunities
to obtain a high-quality education and reach at
minimum proficiency on challenging state academic
achievement standards and state academic assessments.
• Focused on improving the academic achievement of
low-achieving students in schools with high
concentrations of children from low-income families
and is governed by statuary and regulatory
requirements of Title I, Part A of ESEA.
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U.S. Department of Education
FAST FACTS ON TITLE I
•
•
•
•
Was initiated in 1965 as part of the War on Poverty.
Serves more than 18 million students nationwide.
Serves students Pre-K through 12th grade.
Is the single largest pre-college Federal education
program with over $14 billion allocated in recent
years.
• In 2010-2011 school year, there were 66,646 schools
receiving Title I funds, 48,900 of which operated
schoolwide programs.
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RESULTS FOR STUDENTS
THE HIGHEST HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION RATE IN DECADES
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RESULTS FOR STUDENTS
1.1 MILLION FEWER STUDENTS ATTENDING DROPOUT FACTORIES
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OUR UNFINISHED TASK:
MANY LOW-INCOME STUDENTS FAIL TO COMPLETE HIGH SCHOOL
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OUR UNFINISHED TASK:
DISPARITIES IN HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION
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OUR UNFINISHED TASK:
ONLY 29% OF LOW-INCOME STUDENTS GO TO COLLEGE
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OUR UNFINISHED TASK:
ONLY 9% OF LOW-INCOME STUDENTS COMPLETE COLLEGE
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U.S. Department of Education
IMPROVING BASIC TITLE I PROGRAM
OPERATED BY AN LEA
•
Title I is a distinct Federal program with specific
purposes.
•
Program flexibilities contribute to opportunity for
partnership with SEAs, LEAs, and schools.
•
These flexibilities generally apply regardless of whether
an SEA has received ESEA flexibility.
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U.S. Department of Education
TWO TYPES OF TITLE I PROGRAMS
• Targeted Assistance
– Supplemental education services to eligible
students with the greatest need.
• Schoolwide
– Comprehensive program designed to upgrade
the entire educational program in order to
improve achievement of the lowest-achieving
students.
• a school with poverty percentage of 40% or more.
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U.S. Department of Education
SCHOOLWIDE PROGRAMS
A Schoolwide Program:
• Maximizes flexibility in using Federal funds.
• Serves as a vehicle for whole-school reform with focus on
improving achievement of lowest-achieving students.
• Allows for easier leveraging of non-Federal and Federal
funds to work together to improve educational performance
of the entire school.
• Addresses student needs through a schoolwide plan based
on a comprehensive needs assessment.
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U.S. Department of Education
10 COMPONENTS
1. Comprehensive needs assessment of entire school
2. Comprehensive schoolwide plan
a.
Incorporates whole school reform strategies that-i. Strengthen the core academic program
ii. Increase the amount of quality learning time to help provide
enriched and accelerated curriculum
iii. Meet the needs of historically underserved students
iv. Provide services the meet the needs of low-achieving students
b. Focuses on ensuring Highly Qualified Teachers in schools
c. Incorporates high-quality ongoing professional development
d. Identifies strategies to attract Highly Qualified Teachers
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U.S. Department of Education
10 COMPONENTS CONT’D
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
Incorporates parent engagement strategies
Assists pre-school children transition to elementary school
Includes teachers in Data-Driven Decision-making
Provides low-achieving students with effective, timely additional
assistance
Focuses on the coordination and integration of funds
3. Annual evaluation, with revisions as necessary
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U.S. Department of Education
IMPORTANCE OF THE NEEDS ASSESSMENT
• Title I, Part A funds may be used for any activity that
supports the needs of students, particularly the lowestachieving students, in the school that are identified
through a comprehensive needs assessment and
included in the schoolwide plan.
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U.S. Department of Education
ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS
Will the proposed use of funds:
• Drive results for students who are failing, or most at risk of
failing, to meet State academic achievement standards?
• Increase educators’ long-term capacity to improve results for
Title I students?
• Accelerate reform and advance SEA, LEA, or participating
Title I school improvement objectives and reform goals?
• Foster continuous improvement and include approaches to
measure and track implementation and results and create
feedback loops to modify or discontinue strategies that evidence
indicates are ineffective in improving achievement of Title I
students?
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U.S. Department of Education
KEY REQUIREMENTS
•
Supplement not Supplant. Federal funds must supplement,
and not supplant, non-Federal funds. Supplement not supplant
applies differently in different programs; within Title I, it applies
differently in a schoolwide vs. a targeted assistance school.
•
Necessary and Reasonable. Federal funds must support
activities that are necessary and reasonable to accomplish the
federal program’s purpose.
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U.S. Department of Education
COLLEGE- AND CAREER-READY
(CCR)
STANDARDS
AND
ASSESSMENTS
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U.S. Department of Education
A WORD OF CAUTION…
The examples in this presentation illustrate ways that Title I funds may
be used by SEAs and LEAs to support key areas of reform in a
schoolwide program.
Because they are merely examples, however, they do not take into
account the specific context in which these funds would be used at the
State or local levels.
Thus, an SEA, LEA or school should ensure that such use is consistent
with relevant programmatic requirements.
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U.S. Department of Education
USE OF FUNDS
SEAs may:
•
Develop standards and assessments for all students
(Title I/Consolidated ESEA State administrative funds).
•
Provide professional development to implement CCR standards
and assessments (ESEA Section 6111 – State assessment funds).
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U.S. Department of Education
USE OF FUNDS
SEAs may:
•
•
Provide technical assistance to low-performing schools and LEAs.
Use the school improvement reservation for their State system of
support and establish eligibility criteria to determine the schools that
receive this support and the amount of funds.
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U.S. Department of Education
USE OF FUNDS
LEAs may:
•
•
•
Prepare low-achieving students to participate successfully in
advanced coursework aligned with CCR standards.
Provide intensive summer programs to low-achieving high school
students to prepare them to take advanced classes.
Ensure the educational needs of low-achieving students in highestpoverty schools are met.
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U.S. Department of Education
USE OF FUNDS
LEAs may:
• Provide educators with professional development, and materials
and supplies, to implement the schoolwide plan.
• Hire outside data experts to work with the staff of Title I
schools to build their capacity to analyze student data more
effectively to improve instruction and identify appropriate
academic interventions.
• Hire mathematics and reading coaches to work with teachers
where the data indicate a need for improved instruction or to
help science teachers in a Title I school operating a schoolwide
program to implement interdisciplinary strategies to promote
literacy across the curriculum.
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U.S. Department of Education
USE OF FUNDS
Title I schoolwide schools may:
• Increase participation of low-achieving students in advanced
coursework.
• Provide intensive summer school classes for low-achieving
students, including high school students to prepare them for the
rigor of taking advanced courses.
• Provide afterschool tutoring.
• Develop and use formative and interim assessments to track
progress of low-achieving students and train teachers in their
use.
• Purchase or develop supplemental instructional materials aimed
at improving achievement of low-achieving students, including
Student with Disabilities and English Learners.
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U.S. Department of Education
USE OF FUNDS
Title I schoolwide schools may:
• Conduct needs assessments
• Upgrade the curriculum for the entire school
• Implement an early warning system to identify low-achieving
students or students at risk of dropping out
• Extend the school day or school year
• Reorganize class schedules to increase teacher planning time
• Revamp the school’s discipline process to improve
achievement of low-achieving students
• Hire additional teachers to serve Title I students
• Hire specialist to coach teachers in how to better serve lowachieving students
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U.S. Department of Education
USE OF FUNDS
Title I schoolwide schools may:
• Reorganize classes to promote personalized learning for lowachieving students
• Implement career academies to assist low-performing
students prepare for college and careers
• Implement school safety programs to improve the
achievement of low-achieving students
• Provide professional development to ensure effective
teachers and leaders to serve low-achieving students
• Engage in activities to improve school climate designed to
improve the achievement of low-achieving students
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U.S. Department of Education
USE OF FUNDS
Turning Around Low-Achieving Title I Schools. Implementing
rigorous interventions to turn around low-achieving schools
– Assessing strengths and weaknesses of school leaders,
teachers, and other school staff
– Recruiting principals
– Screening and identifying external partners
– Multipronged strategies for changing school’s culture and
improving teaching and learning
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U.S. Department of Education
DISCUSSION
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