Centers for Disease Control

Report
Centers for Disease
Control
Siddare Wilson, Kimberly Van Oflen,
Thomas Van Bergen, Ben Warren
Mission and Purpose
Mission: "Collaborating to create the
expertise, information, and tools that
people and communities need to protect
their health through health promotion,
prevention of disease, injury, and disability,
and preparedness for new health threats."
-accomplishes this Mission by working with
partners throughout the world and nation.
Core Value: Accountability, Respect, Integrity
History of the CDC
1946 - Communicable Disease Center organized in Atlanta
1951 - Establishment of the Epidemic Intelligence Service
to help protect against biological warfare and
manmade epidemics
1963 - Developed the vaccine for smallpox
1981- First AIDS Diagnosis
2001- First Anthrax Case
2003- SARS reported in Asia
2006 - 60th Birthday
2008- found food gaps in food safety (needs to improve
FDA and food borne illnesses)
How is the CDC divided up?
CDC Facilities
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Headquarters and Emergency Operation Center
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Global Communication Center
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Emerging Infectious Disease Laboratory
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Environmental Health Laboratory
CDC Offices
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Center for Global Health
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National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
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Office of Infectious Disease
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Office of Noncommunicable Disease, Injury, and Environmental Health
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Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response
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Office for State Tribal Local and Territorial Support
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Office of Surveillance Epidemiology and Laboratory Services
CDC Organizational Chart
Office of Infectious Disease (OID)
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The purpose of the OID is to promote, lead, and
facilitate science, programs, and policies to decrease
the problem of infectious diseases nationally as well as
globally.
The Office of Infectious Disease includes:
- Deputy Director of Infectious Disease (DDID)
- Influenza Coordination Unit (ICU)
- Infectious Disease National Centers
i. National Center of Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease
(NCEZID)
ii. National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB
Prevention (NCHHSTP)
iii.National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases
(NCIRD)
Office of Infectious Disease (OID)
• Dr. Rima Khabbaz serves as
Director of OID and CDC's
Deputy Director of DDID.
• Dr. Khabbaz is currently
serving as Acting Director
for the National Center for
HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis,
STD, and TB Prevention.
• Her role as the principal
advisor is to provide strategic
leadership to the three
Infectious Disease National
Centers.
Infectious Disease National Centers
1. NCEZID
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Beth P. Bell is the director over this center.
The center aims to detect, prevent, and control
the spreading infectious disease through the result
of terrorism, unintentionally, or naturally
occurring.
Protects within the U.S. and globally through
epidemiologic and laboratory studies, applied
research, and disease surveillance and outbreak
response.
Infectious Disease National Center
2. NCHHSTP
Acting Director is Dr. Rima Khabbaz
o This center is one of the larger centers at the CDC,
with a budget estimating at $1 billion.
o Composed of an Office of the Director and four
divisions where each division is defined by the
specific disease addressed.
o Responsible for public health surveillance,
prevention research, and programs to control and
prevent AIDS and HIV, other STDS, viral hepatitis,
and TB
o
Infectious Disease National Centers
3. NCIRD
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o
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Divisions: Bacterial Diseases, Global Immunizations,
Influenza, Viral Diseases, Immunization Services
Director is Anne Schuchat who is also an Assistant
Surgeon General of the U.S. Public Health Service
and Acting Director of the Center of Global Health
Purpose is the prevention of disease, disability
through immunization and by control of respiratory
and related diseases.
Office of Noncommunicable
Disease, Injury, and Environmental
Health
-National Center on Birth Defects and
Developmental Disabilities
-National Center for Chronic Disease
Prevention and Health Promotion
-National Center for Environmental
Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and
Disease Registry
-National Center for Injury Prevention and
Control
Office of Noncommunicable
Disease, Injury, and Environmental
Health
National Center on Birth Defects and
Developmental Disabilities
-Established in April 2001
-Identify causes of Birth defects and
disabilities
-Help children develop to their full potential
-Birth defects affect 1 in 33 infants and are
the leading cause of newborn death
-NCBDDD focuses on protecting children
(newborn-5) from health risks
Office of Noncommunicable
Disease, Injury, and Environmental
Health
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention
and Health Promotion
- Focus on heart disease, arthritis, strokes,
cancer, and diabetes - most common chronic
diseases
-Major Functions:
Supports implementation of public health
programs
Public Health Surveillance
Translational Research
Developing new Tools and Research
Office of Noncommunicable
Disease, Injury, and Environmental
Health
National Center for Environmental Health
-helps to maintain and improve the health of
American people by promoting a healthy
environment and preventing an early death.
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease
Registry
-Provides health information to prevent
harmful exposures and disease from toxic
substances
Office of Noncommunicable
Disease, Injury, and Environmental
Health
National Center for Injury Prevention and
Control
-Main Focuses:
Car Crashes
Brain Trauma
Painkiller Overdose
Violence against the youth
-Putting violence and injury on the map as an
important public health achievement
The National Institute for
Occupational Safety and Health
(NIOSH)
Mission
The mission of NIOSH is to generate new knowledge in
the field of occupational safety and health and to
transfer that knowledge into practice for the
betterment of workers.
To accomplish this mission, NIOSH conducts scientific
research, develops guidance and authoritative
recommendations, disseminates information, and
responds to requests for workplace health hazard
evaluations.
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The National Institute for
Occupational Safety and Health
(NIOSH)
Origins
The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970
created both NIOSH and the Occupational Safety and
Health Administration (OSHA).
NIOSH is part of the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention (CDC) in the Department of Health and
Human Services.
Additionally, the Federal Mine Safety and Health
Amendments Act of 1977 delegated additional
authority to NIOSH for coal mine health research.
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NIOSH - Locations
NIOSH headquarters are in
Washington, D.C. and
Atlanta, GA. With staff in
Anchorage, AK; Cincinnati, OH; Denver, CO; Morgantown,
WV; Pittsburgh, PA; and Spokane, WA.
NIOSH has a staff of over 1,200 scientists from the
fields of epidemiology, medicine, industrial hygiene,
safety, psychology, engineering, chemistry, statistics,
economics and administration.
In addition to its own research, NIOSH also serves as
the major support for occupational safety and health
research in academic centers in the U.S.
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NIOSH Office of the Director
Dr. John Howard: Director of the
NIOSH in the U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services in
Washington, D.C.
He served in this capacity from July 2002 to July 2008
and was re-appointed in September 2009.
Prior, Dr. Howard served as Chief of the Division of
Occupational Safety and Health in the California
Department of Industrial Relations from 1991 through
2002.
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NIOSH - Research
National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA)
In 1996, NIOSH launched NORA, an innovative publicprivate partnership to establish priorities for
occupational safety and health research both at NIOSH
and throughout the country.
During its first decade, NORA advanced safety and
health knowledge in 21 scientific areas by emphasizing
priority-driven research.
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NIOSH - Research
National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA)
In 2006, NORA began its second decade by focusing
national research on the problems of highest relevance
to workers, employers and occupational safety and
health practitioners.
It is NIOSH’s job to ensure that NORA research
activities are relevant to the problems of today’s
workplaces, conducted using the highest quality
science, and having a measurable impact on improving
the lives of workers.
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NIOSH - Health Hazard Evaluations
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The Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) Program is at the
frontline of NIOSH research and service.
In response to requests from workers (or their
representatives), employers, and other government
agencies, HHE scientists conduct workplace
assessments to determine if workers are exposed to
hazardous materials or harmful conditions and
whether these exposures are affecting worker health.
NIOSH evaluates the workplace environment and the
health of employees by reviewing records and
conducting on-site environmental sampling,
epidemiologic surveys, and medical testing.
Office of Public Health
Preparedness and Response (OPHPR)
Mission
The mission of OPHPR is to safeguard health and save
lives by providing a platform for public health
preparedness and emergency response.
To carry out its mission, OPHPR:
o provides direction and management for the CDC's preparedness and
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response efforts
delivers critical medical assets to the site of a national emergency
provides CDC's core incident management structure to coordinate
and execute preparedness and response activities
regulates the possession, use and transfer of select agents and toxins
and the importation of etiological agents, hosts, and vectors of
human disease
Office of Public Health
Preparedness and Response (OPHPR)
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Established in 2002
Annual Congressional Funding ~$1.5 billion
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~ 3/4 of funds designated to:
 Public Health Emergency Preparedness
Cooperative Agreement
 Strategic National Stockpile
All-hazards approach to preparedness
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Focuses on threats from natural, biological,
chemical and radiological events
Provides strategic direction, coordination and
support for all of CDC’s terrorism preparedness and
emergency response activities.
OPHPR Office of the Director
Ali S. Khan (RET), MD, MPH
U.S. Assistant Surgeon General:
Director of CDC's Office of Public
Health Preparedness and Response
Became director in August 2010
Most recently, Deputy Director of the National Center
for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID)
One of the main architects of CDC's public health
bioterrorism preparedness program
Designed CDC's joint global field epidemiology and
laboratory training program.
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Office of Public Health
Preparedness and Response (OPHPR)
Divisions
Division of
Division of
Division of
(DSNS)
Division of
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Emergency Operations (DEO)
State and Local Readiness (DSLR)
Strategic National Stockpile
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Select Agents and Toxins (DSAT)
Office of Public Health
Preparedness and Response (OPHPR)
Division of Emergency Operations (DEO)
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Responsible for overall coordination of CDC's
preparedness, assessment, response, recovery, and
evaluation prior to and during public health
emergencies
Responsible for CDC Emergency Operations Center
o Command center for monitoring and coordinating CDC's emergency
o
response to public health threats in the United States and abroad
provides worldwide situational awareness and coordinates CDC's
preparedness, assessment, response, recovery, and evaluation for
public health emergencies.
Office of Public Health
Preparedness and Response (OPHPR)
Division of State and Local Readiness (DSLR)
•
Manages the Public Health Emergency Preparedness
(PHEP) Cooperative Agreement
o Supports preparedness nationwide in state, local, tribal, and
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territorial public health departments
As of 2002, provided nearly $9 billion to these public health
departments to upgrade their ability to effectively respond to the
public health consequences of all hazards, including infectious
diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and
radiological events
provides guidance and coordinates technical assistance through CDC
project officers and subject matter experts to the 62 fund awardees
(including all 50 states, eight U.S. territories and freely associated
states, and four localities)
Office of Public Health
Preparedness and Response (OPHPR)
Division of Strategic National Stockpile (DSNS)
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Mission: to deliver critical medical assets to the site of
a national emergency
manages and maintains the Strategic National
Stockpile (SNS)
o National repository of critical medicines and medical supplies
o
established to protect the American public if there is a public health
emergency severe enough to cause state and local supplies to run
out
DSNS procures, stores, and delivers these assets, which are designed
to supplement state and local public health agencies in the event of
a large-scale public health emergency in the United States or its
territories
Office of Public Health
Preparedness and Response (OPHPR)
Division of Select Agents and Toxins (DSAT)
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Oversees the CDC Select Agent Program
o Regulates all entities that possess, use, or transfer biological agents
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or toxins that could pose a severe threat to public health and safety
Select agents include the bacteria that cause anthrax and plague
and the virus that causes smallpox
The program helps ensure compliance with select agent regulations
by providing guidance to registered entities and conducting
evaluations and inspections
References
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http://www.cdc.gov/phpr/
http://www.cdc.gov/about/organization/cio.htm
http://www.cdc.gov/NCBDDD/AboutUs/index.html
http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/about/index.htm
http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/
http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/
http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/overview/in
dex.html
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/about.html
http://www.cdc.gov/about/leadership/leaders/howar
d.htm

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