Unique Needs of Transfer Students

Report
The Unique Needs of
Transfer Students
Carolyn Blattner, Charisse Coston, Kevin Parsons
September 30, 2013
Goals
• Consider characteristics of transfer
students
• Understand some of the challenges
transfer students face
• Discuss implications for academic
advising to support transfer student
success
Snapshot of UNC Charlotte Transfers
Entering Transfer Class, Fall Semester
3541
4000
2798
3000
2568
2203
2000
1906
1631
1000
0
2000-01
2006-07
2012-13
New Freshmen
New Transfers
Tamara Johnson, Student Success at UNC Charlotte: A Series of Working Papers
New TR Student Demographics
2011-2012
Prior Institution
•73% from NC institutions
•51% from NC community colleges
•CPCC largest single feeder
Credit Hours Transferred
~30% transfer 61-75 hours
~38% transfer 31-60 hours
~21% transfer 30 or fewer hours
Cynthia Wolf Johnson, Student Success Working Group (February 12, 2013)
Claire Kirby, Student Success Working Group (April 9, 2013)
UNC Charlotte Transfer Population
by College
Fall 2011
College
COAA
COB
CCI
COED
COEN
CHHS
CLAS
UCOL
No College Designated
TOTAL
Number of
Number of
Enrolled
Enrolled
Transfers
Undergrads Percentage
340
947
36%
1,404
2,913
48%
392
919
43%
517
1,183
44%
954
2,533
38%
952
2,250
42%
3,303
7,104
46%
733
2,325
32%
1
109
1%
8,596
20,283
42%
Source: Report Central, All Undergraduate Student Demographics, retrieved July 2013
Summary – One Year Persistence
Cohorts: FALL 2005-2007-2009-2011; Criteria #1: Transfer Origin; Criteria #2: Initial Enrollment Status
Transfer Origin
Community
College
graduates
2-Year school, no
degree
4-year school, no
degree
Second degree
and other
Initial
Enrollment
Status
2011
(N=2407)
Full-Time
84.9%
Part-Time
68.6%
Full-Time
78.3%
Part-Time
68.0%
Full-Time
77.6%
Part-Time
64.1%
Full-Time
64.9%
Part-Time
63.4%
Full-Time
79.3%
(78.0 FR)
Part-Time
66.9%
TOTAL
Cynthia Wolf Johnson, Student Success Working Group (February 12, 2013)
EASE Survey
The Successful Transfer Student
•Most attempted hours and higher attempted /earned
hours ratio
•Previous education experience matters (hours earned &
degree attainment)
•Highest first semester GPA
•Self report that they were most prepared for class
•Self report that they know when to seek out faculty for
help if needed
Ted Elling, Student Success Working Group (April 23, 2013)
National Context
Transfer swirl: attending multiple institutions
to earn degree
Transfer shock: dip in transfer student’s
grades during first semester at new institution
Activity
Two-minute Brainstorm:
• Group 1: Academic issues for transfer
students
• Group 2: Social/Emotional issues for
transfer students
• Group 3: Financial issues for transfer
students
Transitions: Academics
• Academic Performance: New Transfers are
placed on academic probation at higher rates than New
Freshmen at end of first fall semester
• Class Size: Many new students report class sizes less
than 50 at previous institution
• Logistics of Transfer: New transfers regularly
report questions about transfer credit, exemptions,
requirements
Source: Academic Standing of All Undergraduate Students Report, Fall 2011,
Institutional Research
Source: Informal Survey, SOAR 2013
Transfer Student Stories
Many transfer students self-identify
challenges and realize what they need to
be successful.
Transfer Student Challenges
Academic
“In the past while taking courses at
CPCC, I felt less motivated while
being there so I was just doing
assignments to get by. I will be
using all the resources that are
available to me to go above and
beyond.”
Advising Implications: Academic Challenges
Progression:
•
•
Use CAPP and advising transcript
Pay close attention to course attributes and course
electives
General Education:
•
•
•
General Education attribute exempts student from
specific requirement
Contact Admissions or suggest student make appeal
if course title seems similar to GenEd requirement
University Advising Center can assist
Advising Implications: Academic Challenges
Academic policy
• Explain tuition surcharge or suggest student review
policy if transferring large number of credits
• GenEd appeals go to Dean of University College
• Major/minor appeals go to dept. chair
• GPA does not transfer
• Ask about completion of associate’s degree if student
has large number of community college credits
• Beware of repeated courses when possible
• Remind student that UNC Charlotte policies may be
different than those at previous institution
Advising Implications: Academic Challenges
Academic Performance
• Help student select courses that meet requirements and
allow for successful performance
• Discuss strategies for succeeding in large courses
• Encourage connection with faculty
• Encourage use of campus resources
• Encourage regular class attendance
Transfer Student Challenges
Socio-Emotional
“I hope to find time to join and
participate in at least a few
clubs/organizations while I’m here,
as well as enjoy catching our
school athletic teams compete.
Also, I’m hoping to forge some
long-lasting friendships that will
endure even after graduation.”
Advising Implications: Socio-Emotional
Challenges
Engagement—Academic and Social
•
•
•
•
•
Encourage student to connect with faculty and
become involved in life of the department (honorary,
research opportunities, events)
Encourage regular contact and connection with
advisor
Discuss social and community engagement
opportunities
Encourage connection with University Career Center
early
Consider ways that internships or other experiential
learning opportunities may fit into student’s plan
Transfer Student Challenges
Financial
“Everyday expenses and
renting is a headache, but I
plan to use Financial Aid and
National Guard benefits to
help. Maybe a campus job
too.”
Advising Implications: Financial Challenges
•
•
•
•
•
•
Discuss work/school balance
Refer to Office of Student Financial Aid
Refer to University Career Center, on-campus job
postings
Understand residency requirements (in-state and
out-of-state)
Explain possibility of tuition surcharge
Student will want to consider family financial
situation (dependence)
A Faculty Advisor Summary
•Concerns
•Challenges for advisors
•Challenges for students
•Expectations
Criminal Justice and Criminology
Department
• About half of our undergraduate population
in major are transfer students
• Transfer students were graduating at
slower pace than native students
CJUS Learning Community Goals
• To aid academic and social transition during the transfer
process
• To provide a sense of belonging
• To introduce students to the major and to UNC Charlotte
• To involve students in the major and/or UNC Charlotte
through a self-chosen volunteer experience
Year Long Program
• Limited to 25 newly admitted transfer
students
• Course 1: Graded, Writing-Intensive
requirement
• Blocked Seating in another course,
dependent upon pre-major or major
• Course 2: Graded, Oral Communication
requirement, includes volunteer experience
Descriptive Characteristics of
Two Samples
Non-Traditional (53)
Frequency
Percentage
Race
White
Black
Hispanic
International
Gender
Male
Female
Traditional (47)
Frequency
Percentage
30
15
6
1
57
28
11
2
24
18
2
3
51
38
4
6
24
29
45
55
23
24
49
51
Descriptive Characteristics of
Two Samples (cont.)
Non-Traditional (53)
Traditional (47)
25 (2.1)
21 (2)
Non-Traditional (53)
Frequency Percentage
Traditional (47)
Frequency Percentage
Median Age
and Standard
Deviation
Status
Pre-Majors
32
60
41
87
21
40
6
13
*must take Intro to CJ and
Stats before matriculating
to major)
Majors
Research on Transfer Student Stressors
Method
•LC students were asked to indicate their
biggest stressors (open-ended), and then to
rank order the intensity of stressor(s)
•Question asked at three times during the
year of participation in LC.
Results:
Top 5 Non-Traditional Student Stressors
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Learning New Campus
Transfer Credit
Loneliness
Balancing full time work and school
New rules and practices
Results:
Top 5 Traditional Student Stressors
1. Learning New Campus
2. Transfer Credit
3. Registering for Classes
(tie) Loneliness
4. Transferring from Pre-Major to Major
5. Learning new policies and rules
Sources
This presentation is based, in part, upon material derived from the following sources:
Coston, C; Blowers, A, and D. Baals. (under editorial review) Non-traditional transfer students:
Assessing academic outcomes from participants in a criminal justice learning community.
Lord, V.; Coston C; Blowers, A; Davis, B. and K. Johannes (2012). The multidimensional
impact of a transfer learning community. Journal of First Year Experience and Students in
Transition. Vol.24 (2).
Coston, C; Lord, V. and J. Monell (2010). Improving the success of transfer students:
Responding to risk factors. Journal of Learning Community Research. 5 (2).
Reprinted in Learning Communities Research and Practice . 1 (1).
Campus Resources
•Tau Sigma Transfer Student Honor Society
•Office of Adult Students and Evening Services (OASES)
•Transfer Student Admissions website
•Office of the Registrar
•Facebook group called “Transfer Students-UNC Charlotte”
•University Career Center
•University Center for Academic Excellence
•Office of Student Activities
•Veteran Student Outreach
•Multicultural Academic Services
•Advising and student services office listed for your major and college
• Transfer Specialists in Dean of Students, University Advising Center, and
University Career Center
•Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships
•General advising website (http://www.advising.uncc.edu/)
Conclusions
Advisors can continue to advocate for
transfers and become informed about
unique needs.
CJUS provides one model that addresses
Academic, Socio Emotional,
Work/Financial issues
Questions/Discussion

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