learning disabilities in the classroom

Report
LEARNING DISABILITIES IN THE
CLASSROOM
By:
Mrs. VIJAYA VAITHILINGAM
FR. AGNEL MULTIPURPOSE SCHOOL,
VASHI, NAVI MUMBAI
“To See The World
In A Grain Of Sand
And Heaven
In A Wild Flower
Hold Infinity
In The Palm Of Your Hand
And Eternity
In An Hour”
-- William Blake
A classroom sees a convergence of a variety
of domestic, environmental, social, cultural
and economic influences that children
bring with them everyday.
In the midst of all this is
LEARNING DISABILITY!!
The concept of “LEARNING DISABILITY”
has one meaning for the general public but
a different meaning for professionals.
THE ABILITY MAZE
To be ABLE is to have the means/skill/opportunity
To do some things
To be UNABLE is not to have the means/skill/
opportunity
To do some things
If ABILITY is the quality one has
To do some things
INABILITY is the state of being unable
To DISABLE means to put out of action
And DISABILITY ??.....
Does “something” mean “everything” ?
Is every “inability” a “disability”?
If one is “unable” to do something is he/she
“handicapped”??
Educators and professionals need to constantly
work on clarifying misconceptions. It is like
cleaning the path while making it.
We must remember…
The term “LD” does not include learning
problems that are primarily the result of
visual, hearing or motor disabilities, of
mental retardation, of emotional
disturbance or of environmental, cultural
or economic disadvantages.
“LD’s” are characterized by intra- individual
differences, usually in the form of
discrepancy between a student’s ability
and his/her achievement in areas such
as reading, writing, mathematics or
speaking. Some students with LD also
have difficulties with social relations.
WHAT TO LOOK FOR?
• PRE-PRIMARY LEVEL (age 3 – 5)
– Does the child have difficulty
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Connecting spoken sounds with letters?
Counting and learning numbers?
Being understood when he/she speaks to a stranger?
Using crayons/ working with fingers?
Reacting to touch (too much or too little) ?
Pronouncing words?
Working forward or up and down stairs?
Remembering names of colors?
Dressing himself/herself without assistance?
• PRIMARY LEVEL
(AGE 6- 10)
– Does the child have difficulty
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Reading accurately and comprehending what is read?
Learning new vocabulary/ skills?
Understanding the rules of conversation?
Retelling stories?
Playing with peers/ age appropriate games?
Moving from one activity to another?
Expressing thoughts verbally or in writing?
Computing maths problem at his/her grade level?
Following directions?
Remembering routines/deadlines and keeping to them?
Drawing or copying shapes?
Modulating voice?
Being organized?
• SECONDARY LEVEL (age 11 – 15)
– Does the individual have difficulty
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Remembering newly learnt information?
Staying organized?
Understanding what he/she reads?
Expressing thoughts verbally or in writing and using proper
grammar?
Following directions?
Getting along with peers?
Understanding jokes that are sarcastic or subtle?
Making appropriate remarks?
Remembering and sticking to deadlines?
WHAT DO WE DO?
Option I:
To find IQ- Achievement Discrepancy
Option II:
Response to Intervention (RTI)
Option III:
Combine the two.
CONCESSION Vs. ACCOMODATION
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Giving a student extra time for an exam
Allowing a choice of subject especially languages
Providing assistance of a writer
Providing training in assistive technology
Providing easy to understand instructions and
notes
Let’s call them ACCOMODATIONS.
“Concessions” sound condescending.
HOW DOES IT HAPPEN?
• Good child centered
innovative teaching
practices
• Learning from
individual differences
Special & general education
teachers collaborating to
improve teaching strategies
or co-teaching
Including parents of students
with learning disabilities to
be a part of the school’s
design of education.
“Who is there to do my duties?”, said the
setting sun.
“I shall do what I can, my master!”, said
the little lamp.
- Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore.

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