Conference PPT Lori Storer CII Session 6-25-2011

Report
USING SCHOOL DATA TO
IMPROVE TEACHING PRACTICES
Presented by: Lori Storer
JUNE – WHEW! WE MADE IT!
• Have we completed our autopsy?
•
•
Did the results of our academic “care” work?
If our planned and delivered “care” did not work,
• What didn’t work?
• Why didn’t it work?
• Who was affected?
• What other “treatments” could we have tried?
CYCLES OF SCHOOL
• End with testing data /
• Disaggregate over the summer
•
•
Talk about changes that need to occur
• Students return and new students arrive
Data changes and some have learned and some
have forgotten
• New Data is collected
•
• Training takes place for new adoptions and interventions
• Staff learn and plan what they will do the next year
And so we begin again…
THE LEADERSHIP AND LEARNING MATRIX
BY DOUGLAS B. REEVES
Lucky
Leading
Losing
Learning
Organizational Results
LEADERSHIP AND LEARNING MATRIX
(REEVES, 2010)
Lucky:
Leading:
•Good results with
no understanding of
the reasons
•Replication of
success not probable
•Good results with
clear understanding
of the reasons
•Replication very
probable
Losing:
Learning:
•Poor results with no
understanding of the
reasons
•Replication neither
probable nor
desirable
•Poor results with
clear understanding
of the reasons
•Replication of
mistakes not
probable
Antecedents of Excellence
3 CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH IMPACT
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (REEVES, 2010)
1.Focus on student
learning
2. Rigorous measurement of adult
decisions
3. A focus on people and practices, not
programs
STUDENT LEARNING – DOES IT EQUAL
DATA?
•What is data?
• “…the compelling evidence that grounds conclusions in
actual results, not in speculation.” (Nancy Love, 2002)
•Why do we need it?
• “…so it can be translated into meaningful information that
can then be used to make decisions and improve
instruction.”
•“In GOD we trust, everyone else
bring data.”
(IN RtI Conference, 2007)
•“ When you use data, you
attack the problem and not the
people.”
KEY QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF:
1. At what level of proficiency are your students currently
performing?
1. Which students (subgroups)?
2. Which subjects (ELA, Math, Science, Social Studies)?
3. How long (trend lines)?
4. Have any major changes occurred?
2. In looking at student data of those who are not
achieving, what is different for them?
1.
2.
3.
4.
Which students (subgroups)?
Which subjects (ELA, Math, Science, Social Studies)?
How long (trend lines)?
Have any major changes occurred?
IDENTIFY YOUR SCHOOL GOAL
S.M.A.R.T Goal:
• Specific and Strategic
• Measurable
• Attainable
• Results Oriented
• Time bound
96% of XYZ School will score at or above proficiency in
writing applications and/or improve by 1 rubric point on
the ABC test by May, 2012.
COMMON CORE –
WHAT DOES IT LOOK LIKE?
•Get it in their hands…YESTERDAY!
• College and Career Readiness
• What goals are you working on? What
does that look like in Common Core?
• Transition Guides (Compares & Contrasts
State Standards to Common Core
Standards)
3 CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH IMPACT
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (REEVES, 2010)
1. Focus on student learning
2.Rigorous measurement
of adult decisions
3. A focus on people and practices, not
programs
KEY QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF:
3.
Based upon the data, what is working?
1.
What parts of the curriculum, instruction, and assessment
do these students have in common?
1.
2.
3.
4.
4.
Materials? (stuff)
Resources? (people)
Best practices? (strategies)
Implementation with fidelity? (consistency)
Based upon the data, what is not working?
1.
What parts of the curriculum, instruction, and assessment
do these students have in common?
1.
2.
3.
4.
Materials? (stuff)
Resources? (people)
Best practices? (strategies)
Implementation with fidelity? (consistency)
COMMON CORE –
HOW WILL IT BE MEASURED?
•Get it in their hands…as soon as you can!
• PARCC Assessment
• Smarter Balance
•What are the core capacities/securely held
content that students are responsible for
from dd/mm/yy forward?
HOW ARE YOU GOING TO GET THERE?
•Focus on curriculum?
•Focus on instruction?
•Focus on assessment?
•What evidence do you have?
CURRICULUM/INSTRUCTION/ASSESSMENT
Expectation/Priority
Learning targets are
explicit and
understood by all
Instruction is
intentional and
evidence-based.
Evidence
Teachers write
learning targets in
lesson plans, on
whiteboards, and in
newsletters to share
with parents.
Need
Aligned
assessments?
LINDA LAMBERT SAYS…
“People learn themselves through change.”
3 CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH IMPACT
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (REEVES, 2010)
1. Focus on student learning
2. Rigorous measurement of adult
decisions
3.A focus on people and
practices, not programs
KEY QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF:
3.
Based upon the data, what is working?
1.
What parts of the curriculum, instruction, and assessment
do these students have in common?
1.
2.
3.
4.
4.
Materials? (stuff)
Resources? (people)
Best practices? (strategies)
Implementation with fidelity? (consistency)
Based upon the data, what is not working?
1.
What parts of the curriculum, instruction, and assessment
do these students have in common?
1.
2.
3.
4.
Materials? (stuff)
Resources? (people)
Best practices? (strategies)
Implementation with fidelity? (consistency)
LOUCKS-HORSLEY
Framework for Professional
Development:
Steps to ensure
a focus
on people and practices
and NOT programs
that plans for and requires accountability
Logic Model =
Professional Development that
includes a
Gradual Release of
Responsibility
GRADUAL RELEASE (FISHER & FREY, 2008)
• I do it
• We do it
• You do it together
• You do it alone
HOW WILL WE MONITOR
OUR PROGRESS?
“Plan your work and work your plan.”
Identify the expected outcomes for:
teacher learning
student learning
Identify the evidence we will collect about:
teacher learning progress
student learning progress
Collect evidence, reflect, and revise
LOGIC MODEL
Teacher
Learning
Outcomes
Teacher
Learning
Outcomes
Teacher
Learning
Outcomes
Teacher
Learning
Outcomes
Teacher
Learning
Outcomes
Teacher
Learning
Outcomes
Teacher
Practice
Outcomes
Teacher
Practice
Outcomes
Teacher
Practice
Outcomes
Teacher
Practice
Outcomes
Teacher
Practice
Outcomes
Teacher
Practice
Outcomes
Student
Learning
Outcomes
Student
Learning
Outcomes
Student
Learning
Outcomes
Student
Learning
Outcomes
Monitoring Tools
Student
Learning
Outcomes
Student
Learning
Outcomes
S
t
u
d
e
n
t
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
G
o
a
l
DATA SOURCES
To what extent are teachers implementing the instructional materials?
•Classroom observation protocols/checklists
•Student/teacher interviews
•Student, teacher, parent focus groups
•Teacher self-assessments
•Student portfolios
Is there a relationship between how students achieve on the state test
and course enrollment?
•State test results for school disaggregated by course enrollment
To what extent are best-practice instructional strategies implemented in
classes?
•Classroom observation protocols/checklists
•Student/teacher interviews
•Student, teacher, parent focus groups
•Teacher self-assessments
•Student portfolios
Organizational Results
LEADERSHIP AND LEARNING MATRIX
(REEVES, 2010)
Lucky:
Leading:
•Good results with
no understanding of
the reasons
•Replication of
success not probable
•Good results with
clear understanding
of the reasons
•Replication very
probable
Losing:
Learning:
•Poor results with no
understanding of the
reasons
•Replication neither
probable nor
desirable
•Poor results with
clear understanding
of the reasons
•Replication of
mistakes not
probable
Antecedents of Excellence
BIBLIOGRAPHY
•Transforming Professional Development into Student
Results; Douglas B. Reeves; ASCD, Alexandria, VA © 2010.
•The Data Coach’s Guide to Improving Learning for All
Students; Nancy Love, Katherine E. Stiles, Susan Mundry,
Kathryn DiRanna; Joint publication by Corwin Press,
TERC, RBT, WestEd, ©2008.
•The Power of SMART Goals; Anne Conzemius & Jan
O’Neil; Solution Tree, ©2005.
•Better Learning Through Structured Teaching; Douglas
Fisher and Nancy Frey; ASCD, Alexandria, VA©2008.

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