Linked list

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LECTURE 3:LIKED LIST
linear list Concept:
Linear list :
 Each element has a unique successor.
 Two approaches to implement a linear list
Array:
 Inefficient when element needs to be inserted or
deleted.
Linked list:
 Efficient when element needs to be inserted or
deleted.
Categories of linear list
Linked list
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One disadvantage of using arrays to store data is
that arrays are static structures and therefore
cannot be easily extended or reduced to fit the
data set .
Linked list con..
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Arrays are also expensive to maintain new
insertions and deletions.
In this chapter we consider another data structure
called Linked Lists that addresses some of the
limitations of arrays.
Linked list con..
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A linked list, in its simplest form, is a collection of
nodes that together form a linear ordering.
Each node is an object that stores a reference to an
element and a reference, called next, point to
another node.
Linked list con..
The order of the nodes is determined by the
address, called the link, stored in each node
 Every node (except the last node) contains the
address of the next node
Components of a node :
 Data: stores the relevant information
 Link: stores the address of the next node
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Linked list –Node Structure
Structure of a node:
Data
link
Linked list –Node Structure con..
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A node with one data field
number
A node with three data fields
name
id
grdPts
A structure in a node
name
Home_Address
phone
Linked list –Head Structure
Head or first :
 Holds the address of the first node in the list
 The info part of the node can be either a value of
a primitive type or a reference to an object
Linked list –Head Structure con..
Linked list classes
Class Node
 Represents nodes on a list
 It has two instance variables
- info (of type int, but it can be any other type)
- link (of type Node)
public class Node {
public int info;
public Node link;
}
Linked List: Some Properties
Linked list with four nodes
Linked List: Some Properties
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Now consider the statement current = head;
Linked list after current = head; executes
Linked List: Some Properties
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Now consider the statement
current = current.link;
List after the statement current = current.link;
Linked List: Some Properties
Singly Linked list Operations
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Insertion
Deletion
Traversal
Traversing a Linked List
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Basic operations of a linked list that require the link
to be traversed
Search the list for an item
Insert an item in the list
Delete an item from the list
You cannot use head to traverse the list
You would lose the nodes of the list
Use another reference variable of the same type as
head: current
Traversing a Linked List con..
The following code traverses the list
current = head;
while (current != null) {
//Process current
current = current.link;
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Insertion in a Singly Linked List
Three steps :
 Allocate memory for the new node and insert data.
 Point the new node to its successor.
 Point the new node’s predecessor to the new node
Three cases:
 Insert into an empty list
 Insert at beginning
 Insert at middle
 Insert at end.
Insertion at the beginning:
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The list is empty if the head points to null.
When using a singly linked list, we can easily insert
an element at the head of the list.
The main idea is that we create a new node, set its
next link to refer to the same object as head, and
then set head to point to the new node.
Insertion at the beginning con..
Insertion of an element at the head of a singly
linked list
(a) before the insertion.
(b) creation of a new node.
(c) after the insertion.
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Algorithm of Insertion at the beginning
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Inserting a new node v at the beginning of a singly
linked list.
Note that this method works even if the list is empty.
we set the next pointer for the new node v before we
make variable head point to v.
Insertion in the middle:
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Consider the following linked list
You want to create a new node with info 50 and
insert it after p
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Insertion in the middle con..
The following statements create and store 50 in the
info field of a new node
 Node newNode = new Node(); //create newNode
 newNode.info = 50; //store 50 in the new node
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Create newNode and store 50 in it
Insertion in the middle con..
The following statements insert the node in the
linked list at the required place
newNode.link = p.link;
p.link = newNode;
 The sequence of statements to insert the node is
very important.
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Insertion in the middle con..
newNode.link = p.link; executes
p.link = newNode; executes
Insertion at the Tail (end)
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We can also easily insert an element at the tail of
the list, provided we keep a reference to the tail
node
In this case, we create a new node, assign its next
reference to point to the null object, set the next
reference of the tail to point to this new object, and
then assign the tail reference itself to this new node.
Insertion at the Tail (end) con..
(a) before the insertion
(b) creation of a new node
(c) after the insertion.
Note that:
 we set the next link for the tail in (b) before we
assign the tail variable to point to the new node in
(c).
Algorithm of Insertion at the end
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Inserting a new node at the end of a singly linked
list. This method works also if the list is empty. Note
that we set the next pointer for the old tail node
before we make variable tail point to the new
node.
Deletion in a Singly Linked List
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The reverse operation of inserting a new element at
the head of a linked list remove an element at the
head.
This operation is illustrated in removal of an element
at the head of a singly linked list
(a) before the removal
(b) "linking out" the old new node
(c) after the removal.
Algorithm of Removing the node from the
beginning of a singly linked list
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Unfortunately, we cannot easily delete the tail node of
a singly linked list.
Even if we have a tail reference directly to the last
node of the list, we must be able to access the node
before the last node in order to remove the last node.
But we can not reach the node before the tail by
following next links from the tail.
The only way to access this node is to start from the
head of the list and search all the way through the list.
But such a sequence of link hopping operations could
take a long time.
Doubly Linked Lists
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As we saw in the previous section, , removing an element
at the tail of a singly linked list is not easy.
Indeed, it is time consuming to remove any node other
than the head
since we do not have a quick way of accessing the
node in front of the one we want to remove we do not
have quick access to such a predecessor node.
For such applications, it would be nice to have a way of
going both directions in a linked list.
Doubly Linked Lists (con….)
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There is a type of linked list that allows us to go in
both directions - forward and reverse in a linked list
It is the doubly linked list. Such lists allow for a
great variety of quick update operations, including
insertion and removal at both ends, and in the
middle.
A node in a doubly linked list stores two
references—a next link which points to the next
node in the list, and a prev link, which points to the
previous node in the list.
A doubly linked list with sentinels, header and
trailer.
• An empty list would have these sentinels pointing to
each other.
•
Adding an element at the front
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we can easily perform an insertion of a new
element at the beginning of a doubly linked list
Algorithm of Inserting a new node v at
the beginning of a doubly linked list.
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Variable size keeps track of the current number of
elements in the list.
Note that this method works also on an empty list.
Insertion in the Middle of a Doubly
Linked List
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They also are convenient for maintaining a list of
elements while allowing for insertion and removal in
the middle of the list.
Given a node v of a doubly linked list (which could
be possibly the header but not the trailer)
we can easily insert a new node z immediately
after v. Specifically, let w the be node following v.
We execute the following steps:
Algorithm of Inserting a new node z after a given
node v in a doubly linked list.
1.
2.
3.
4.
make z's prev link refer to v
make z's next link refer to w
make w's prev link refer to z
make v's next link refer to z
Deletion from double linked list
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Removal in the Middle of a Doubly Linked List
(a) before the removal
(b) linking out the old node
(c) after the removal (and garbage collection).
Removing a node v in a doubly linked
list.
This method works even if v is the first, last, or
only nonsentinel node.
Circular linked List
Same as single linked list
Last node link is connected to the first.
 When insert/ delete at the last node
Make sure to update the link field of the last
node to the first node.
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Circular linked list with more than one node
It is convenient to make first point to the last node
Insert a node at the front of CLL
Insert a node at the end of CLL

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