Brian E. Lawlor

Report
CITY OF NEW ORLEANS
The State of Recovery in New Orleans
NAHLFA Annual Educational Conference – April 4, 2013
Brian E. Lawlor, Director of Housing Policy and Community Development
State of Recovery in New Orleans
Major Issues
Strategy
Initiatives
2
Major Issues
Crime
Blight and Vacant Properties
Occupied Substandard Housing
Diminishing Federal Resources
3
Crime
Compared to other
U.S. cities:
• one of the highest
violent crime rates
• one of the highest
homicide rates
• one of the highest
motor vehicle theft
rates
• above average
chance of property
theft
394 reported crimes from 3/26/13 - 4/1/13
www.crimemapping.com
http://www.neighborhoodscout
.com/la/neworleans/crime/#description
4
Blight and Vacant Properties
September 2010 – 43,755 blighted properties
March 2012 – estimated 35,700 blighted properties
5
Substandard Housing
% Housing Problems - Owner Occupied
(households with one of the listed needs)
Percent of
households
0-30%
AMI
>30-50%
AMI
>50-80%
AMI
>80-100%
AMI
TOTAL
% substandard
housing – lacking
complete plumbing or
kitchen facilities
31
11
17
41
100
% severely
overcrowded
13
13
54
20
100
% overcrowded
27
49
12
12
100
% housing cost
burdened
45
27
22
16
100
% severely housing
cost burdened
16
22
45
17
100
# zero/negatives
income and none of
the above problems
795
795
6
Substandard Housing
% Housing Problems - Renters
(households with one of the listed needs)
Percent of
households
0-30%
AMI
>30-50%
AMI
>50-80%
AMI
>80-100%
AMI
TOTAL
% substandard
housing – lacking
complete plumbing or
kitchen facilities
42
28
25
5
100
% severely
overcrowded
36
30
30
4
100
% overcrowded
45
26
22
7
100
% housing cost
burdened
60
33
6
1
100
% severely housing
cost burdened
15
35
40
10
100
# zero/negatives
income and none of
the above problems
2270
2270
The poorer a family is, the more likely the family is to live in substandard housing, experience overcrowding,
and be severely cost burdened. The lower a family falls on the income spectrum, the more likely they are to
experience more than one housing problem.
7
Diminishing Federal Resources
8
Diminishing Federal Resources
HOME Allocations
$7,000,000
$6,000,000
$5,000,000
$4,000,000
HOME
$3,000,000
-11.89%
$2,000,000
$1,000,000
-75.88%
$0
2010
2011
2012
9
Strategy
Facilitate, Link, Leverage
Revitalize Neighborhoods
Place-Based Development
Provide Housing Choices
10
“Facilitate, Link, and Leverage”
Transparency
Collaboration
Accountability
Productivity
11
Neighborhood Revitalization Goals
PEOPLE







Quality early childhood
education
Educated workforce
Children are ready to
enter school
Children are succeeding in
school
Employment and
entrepreneurship
opportunities
Children and families are
healthy
Residents are safe in their
community
NEIGHBORHOOD
₪
Infrastructure and
revitalization
₪
₪
₪
₪
Expand Access to amenities
₪
₪
₪
₪
Blight removal
Green space
Improved public spaces
Fresh foods
Neighborhood
services/retail
Business / job
opportunities
Support Cultural Assets
12
Place-Based Development Areas
13
Provide Housing Choices
Soft Second Mortgages through February 2013
14
Initiatives
Choice Neighborhood Initiative (CNI)
First Time Homebuyer Assistance
Land Disposition
Crime Reduction / Neighborhood Revitalization
Claiborne Corridor Study
Community Development Investments
New Code Enforcement Ordinance
15
Choice Neighborhood Initiative (CNI)
16
First Time Homebuyer Assistance
Affordable
Homeownership
Development
Program
November 2012
Awards
NORA-owned lots
Privately-owned lots
17
Land Disposition
GOAL: reduce blighted properties by 10,000 by
end of 2014
NORA Inventory Movement 2013
Properties Returned to Commerce in
2013 by Program
Total Properties Returned to Commerce by
Program since 2006 (2,441/5,147)
18
Crime Reduction / Neighborhood Investment
19
Claiborne Corridor
Current Land Use
20
Claiborne Corridor
Current Land Use
21
Community Development Investments
22
New Code Enforcement Ordinance
• Eliminate a post-Katrina City Code (Post Disaster
Recovery Relief)
• Revise two chapters regarding “blight” and “public
nuisance” procedures
• Introduce important minimum health/safety
maintenance standards for all properties
Revisions will:
• Improve blight initiatives
• Increase efficiency throughout adjudication process
• Create stronger and more flexible enforcement options
for residential and commercial property
23
New Code Enforcement Ordinance
Occupied property must meet the following
requirements:
• Basic light, ventilation, and occupancy limits
• Basic plumbing and fixture requirements
• Basic mechanical and electrical requirements
In an emergency situation, the City can abate any
threat to public health or safety.
24
CITY OF NEW ORLEANS

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