Claim - Hamburg Central School District

Report
High School ELA
» Shift 4: Students engage in rich and
rigorous evidence based discussions
about a text
» Shift 5: writing emphasizes use of
evidence from sources to inform or make
an argument
» Take a quick walkthrough the Module
Overview:
˃ Make observations about:
+ The types of texts being used in the module
+ The amount of time being dedicated to the
development of Evidence Based Claims
+ What types of texts students are being asked to
compare in the Module Performance Assessment
+ What in-class scaffolds are being provided to help
students achieve success on the Module
Performance Assessment
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Group 1- Page 11
Group 2- Page 12
Group 3- Page 13
Group 4- Page 14
Work in your groups to break down the language of the
Common Core Learning Standards.
In the box marked “I know what this is asking and I
can do this”- make a checklist of the tasks you must
be able to demonstrate or skills you must possess
to achieve this standard.
» Read through the “Yearlong Target Standards” for
Speaking and Listening and Language
˃ As you read, “unpack” the standard.
˃ In the right margin, write the key ideas/skills from
each standard.
˃ In the left margin, make a list of the Tier 2
vocabulary terms in the standard you’d need to
explicitly teach your students.
» Strategies used to engage students in the text:
˃ Masterful Reading
˃ Focus on one anchor standard: CCRA.R.6
+ “Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and
style of a text.”
˃ Focus on the first paragraph only
˃ “First Read” Question:
+ What is the narrator’s purpose in the first paragraph?
Homework:
-A.I.R. with focus standard RL.9-10-.4
-Re-read and annotate Paragraph 1 to gather evidence
about whether the narrator is mad.
» Lesson Assessment:
˃ Quick Write
˃ “What is the narrator’s purpose in asking the two questions in paragraph 1?”
+ Students must:
– Cite evidence from the text
– Analyze key words and phrases from the text
» Vocabulary:
˃ Provided directly vs. “Word Work”
» Lesson Timing: (based on 42 minute class period)
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Intro to Unit and Lesson Agenda- 20% (8.5 minutes)
Homework Accountability (A.I.R.)- 5% (2 minutes)
Masterful Reading- 30% (12.5 minutes)
Paragraph 1 Student Work- 20% (8.5 minutes)
Quick Write- 15% (6.5 minutes)
Closing- 10% (4.5 minutes)
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Group 1- Activity 1
Group 2- Activity 2 and 3
Group 3- Activity 4
Group 4- Activity 5 and 6
In your group, read over your section of the
lesson.
˃ In the left hand column, summarize the tasks to be completed by the
teacher.
˃ In the right hand column, summarize the tasks to be completed by
the student.
» Unit 1: “The Tell Tale Heart” & “I Felt a Funeral in my Brain” 13 Lessons
˃ End of Unit Assessment: Multi-paragraph essay
+ Prompt: “Identify a central idea shared by both texts, “I felt a funeral in my Brain”
and “The Tell Tale Heart” and make an original claim about how Dickinson and
Poe develop and refine this idea.”
» Unit 2: Oedipus the King - 20 Lessons
˃ End of Unit Assessment: Develop a claim, Evidence-Based Discussion and write a
response
+ Prompt: “How does Sophocles develop the conflict between Oedipus’s guilt and his
innocence?”
» Unit 3: Contemporary Non-Fiction Articles - 13 Lessons
˃ End of Unit Assessment: Generate open-ended questions for use in whole-class
discussion, fishbowl discussion
+ Prompt: “How does Sophocles develop the conflict between Oedipus’s guilt and his
innocence?”
9.2- How do authors structure texts and develop
ideas?
10.2- ?(omitted off of the module)
11.2-? ( module not yet published)
CC Regents: demonstrate analysis in reading Part 1
and Part 3; demonstrate competency in writing on
Part 2 and 3
»A conclusion that a
reader has come to
about a text that can be
supported with
evidence from the text.
» 1. a clearly stated inference that arises from
the reading of a text
» 2. supported by specific textual evidence and
is developed through valid reasoning
» 3. claim and support are coherently organized
into a unified explanation
» 4. communicated clearly and precisely with
responsible use and citation of supporting
evidence
More Complex
Less Complex
» More global claims about the
entire text and its meaning
» Claims about more abstract ideas
implied across sections of the
text
» Claims about fairly concrete
ideas presented in short sections
of the text
» Why is it important for my students
to be able to make convincing
claims?
» Why is it important for my students
to be able to evaluate the claims of
others?
» “But, Miss, won’t the author tell us
what we need to know about
_________________?”
» Yes, but writing is a craft and oftentimes what
authors leave out is just as important and what
they include. Every choice an author makes is
intentional, in that they have considered how each
word, sentences, paragraph and the overall
structure of the piece will affect the reader.
» What skills would our students need
to be informed consumers of
media?
www.MartinLutherKing.org is
hosted by the Stormfront
organization. Stormfront’s motto
is “White Pride Worldwide” and
is fronted by a former Grand
Wizard of the KKK.
The Onion’s online website
identifies itself as “America’s
finest News Source”, but also
states that it is a satirical weekly
publication.
The Great Depression
» In order to have our students make
evidence-based claims we need
them to move from:
˃ Literal understanding of a text
˃ To- supported conclusions/inferences
˃ To- claims that arise from and are supported
by the text
»A conclusion that a
reader has come to
about a text that can be
supported with
evidence from the text.
» 1. a clearly stated inference that arises from
the reading of a text
» 2. supported by specific textual evidence and
is developed through valid reasoning
» 3. claim and support are coherently organized
into a unified explanation
» 4. communicated clearly and precisely with
responsible use and citation of supporting
evidence
More Complex
Less Complex
» More global claims about the
entire text and its meaning
» Claims about more abstract ideas
implied across sections of the
text
» Claims about fairly concrete
ideas presented in short sections
of the text
» Explain that a claim “states a conclusion you
have come to… and that you want others to
think about.”
» Pick a subject that is familiar to students, such
as “school lunches” and ask them to brainstorm
some claim statements they might make about
the subject.
» Inform students that claims must be supported
by specific evidence you can point to (this is
what makes claims different from opinions).
» Use a scientific example:
» Claim: “It is cold outside.”
» Support: “The outside thermometer reads 23
degrees F.”
» Non-support: “It feels that way to me.”
» Remind students that to be an expert they
need to have information other than what
they’ve experienced to back up their
claims.
» Focus on “text to text” connections = lead
students to make a claim
» Not “text to self” connections= connections
students make between what they have read
and their own experiences.
» Explain that a claim “demonstrated
knowledge of and sound thinking about a
topic”
» Explain that to demonstrate knowledge
and sound thinking, you need to do
research.
» Explain that for Informational claims- you can
do your research using facts and articles
» Explain that for literary claims- you need to
closely read the text and look for evidence to
support your inferences.
» Start with a statement about what the text tells us
directly (ex. “Tom Sawyer gets the other boys to
pain the fence.”)
» Move to conclusions drawn from thinking about a
key section of the text (ex. Tom Sawyer is a clever
boy.”) with evidence to support (“He tricks the
other boys to paint the fence.)
» To more complex observations about the whole
text requiring evidence from many parts of the
text (ex. “Mark Twain presents Tom Sawyer as a
‘good bad boy’who tricks others and gets into
throuble but also stands up for his friend Jim.”)
» 1. to ensure comprehension of an
important part of the text
» 2. to orient students to the practice of
close reading
» 3. to guide students in searching for
textual evidence

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