PLC Training Powerpoint

Report
P
L
C
An introduction based upon
Learning By Doing: A Handbook for Professional
Learning Communities at Work
Cincinnatus, LaFayette, & McGraw CSDs
Renee M. Burnett * OCM BOCES Network Team
May 9 th,
2012
Deepen our understanding of the PLC process
through case studies & district-specific planning
Lunch on your own
Continue with case studies & planning time
Analyze a PLC meeting
Wrap-up
AGENDA
Examine our current PLC experiences
Define your
PLC
direction for
next year
OUTCOMES
Build shared
knowledge
of the PLC
process
Committee
Grade-Level Team
Meeting
What a
PLC is
NOT
Program
Advancing through a
checklist
4
If you intend to introduce a
change that is incompatible with
the organization’s culture, you
have only three choices:
• Modify the change to be more in line
with the existing culture
Your
PLC
Journey
• Alter the culture to be more in line with
the proposed change
• Or prepare to fail
David Salisbury & Daryl Conner, 1994
5
TRADITIONAL SCHOOL STRUCTURE
INDEPENDENT KINGDOMS
5th
Independent
Kingdom
Independent
Kingdom
Independent
Kingdom
Independent
Kingdom
6th
Independent
Kingdom
Independent
Kingdom
Independent
Kingdom
Independent
Kingdom
7th
Independent
Kingdom
Independent
Kingdom
Independent
Kingdom
Independent
Kingdom
8th
Independent
Kingdom
Independent
Kingdom
Independent
Kingdom
Independent
Kingdom
PLC
OF PLCS
BIG IDEA
Collaborative
PSEUDO PLC STRUCTURE
INDIVIDUAL KINGDOMS
O R G A N I Z E D I N T O I S O L AT E D G R O U P S O N A N I N F R E Q U E N T B A S I S
9th Grade Group
10th Grade Group
11th Grade Group
12th Grade Group
PLC
OF PLCS
Collaborative
BIG IDEAS
Interdependent
GRADE LEVEL MEETINGS
Are we
talking
about the
right
things?
10
True PLC
Structure
=
A cohesive school organized
into interdependent
collaborative teams united by
a PLC foundation
Kindergarten
Vertical
Dialogue
12th grade
Shared Purpose
Shared Vision
Collective Commitments
Ensuring high
levels of learning
for all students
Creating the
structures and
culture to ensure
all students learn
Clarifying how each
individual will
contribute to
achieving the
vision
Shared Goals
Identifying
indicators to
monitor our
progress
OF PLCS
Results-based
Interdependent
Collaborative
PLC
Shared
Purpose
Shared Vision
Collective
Commitments
Shared Goals
BIG IDEAS
Focus on
learning
CFA CROSSWALK
Ch.
•pp.3-4
1
PLC
Journey
13
Focus on
Learning
Collaborative
Teams
Best Practices
in Teaching &
Learning
Action
Oriented
Dissatisfaction
with the Status
Quo
Focus on
Results
PLC
Themes
14
Your
PLC
Journey
15
PROMOTING A CLEAR &
COMPELLING PURPOSE
CASE STUDY #1
Read
The
PLC
Journey
Discuss Advice?
16
BREATHING LIFE INTO MISSION
STATEMENTS
MISSION
VISION
VALUES
GOALS
WHY?
Why do we
exist?
WHAT?
What must our
school become to
accomplish our
purpose?
HOW?
How must we
behave to achieve
our vision?
HOW WILL
WE MARK
OUR
PROGRESS?
TARGETS &
TIMELINES
FUNDAMENTAL
PURPOSE
COMPELLING
FUTURE
COLLECTIVE
COMMITMENTS
Clarifies
priorities &
Sharpens
focus
Gives
directions
Guides
behaviors
Establishes
priorities
17
Promoting a Clear &
Compelling Purpose
Build consensus one
small group at a time
Key
Ideas
Build shared knowledge
Don’t confuse a “mission
statement” with action
18
CFA CROSSWALK
Ch. •pp.6-7
1 •pp.10-12
PLC
Journey
19
CREATING A FOCUS ON
LEARNING
CASE STUDY #2
Read
The
PLC
Journey
Discuss Advice?
20
QUESTIONS THAT DRIVE
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
COMMUNITIES
What do
we want
each
student
to learn?
LEVELS OF CURRICULA
Intended
Implemented
Attained
• Written
• Taught
• Learned
To impact the attained curriculum in
the most powerful way, make certain
the implemented curriculum is
guaranteed and viable.
If we want all students to
learn at high levels, those
who teach them must be
able to answer the
question
“Learn what?”
with a consistent voice.
How will we
know if
each
student
has
learned it?
In my reviews of
accountability data from
hundreds of schools, the
schools with the greatest
gains in achievement
consistently happen to use
common assessments and
collaborative scoring by
faculty.
Doug Reeves, 2007
Creating a Focus on
Learning
Create a school culture that
is simultaneously loose and
tight.
Key
Ideas
Clarify what students must
learn.
Conduct frequent
monitoring of student
learning.
27
CFA CROSSWALK
Ch.2
• Common Formative
Assessments
Ch.3
• Power Standards
Ch. 4
• Unwrapping Power
Standards
Ch. 5
• Designing Quality
CFA
PLC
Journey
28
HOW WILL WE RESPOND WHEN
SOME STUDENTS DON’T
LEARN?
CASE STUDY #3
Read
The
PLC
Journey
Discuss Advice?
29
How will we
respond when
some students
do not learn it?
How will we
respond when some
students already
know it?
The School’s Response
SYSTEMATIC
TIMELY
DIRECTIVE
HIGH LEVELS OF
LEARNING FOR ALL
SYSTEMATIC
ENRICHMENT
SYSTEMATIC
INTERVENTIONS
CLARIFY ESSENTIAL
KNOWLEDGE
MONITOR VIA
COMMON FORMATIVE
ASSESSMENTS
How will we respond when
some students don’t learn?
Interventions should not
become life sentences
Key
Ideas
Interventions are schoolwide, not teacher-specific
Interventions will not
compensate for ineffective
instructional practices
33
CFA CROSSWALK
Ch.7
•pp. 80-82
PLC
Journey
34
BUILDING A COLLABORATIVE
CULTURE
CASE STUDY #4
Read
The
PLC
Journey
Discuss Advice?
35
Teachers work in
collaborative teams.
Teachers clarify the
essential learning for
each student.
Teacher teams
frequently gather
evidence of student
learning.
Based on analysis of
evidence of student
learning, TT identify &
implement the most
powerful instructional
strategies.
Most
Promising
Practices
for
Improving
Student
Learning
The school provides a
collaborative culture
where participants feel
safe to learn, relearn, &
explore teaching &
learning.
John Hattie (2009), Visible Learning
36
The question is not
Do we collaborate?
but rather
What do we collaborate
about?
True
Collaboration
Congenial
Harmony
TEAM LEARNING PROCESS
Clarify
essential
learnings
Develop CFA
Establish
proficiency
targets
Adjust
instruction
Analyze data
from CFA
Building a
Collaborative Culture
Collaboration
vs.
Co-blaberation
Key
Ideas
Identify logical team structures
that can focus on the 4 critical
questions
Create time and provide structures
for collaboration
40
CFA CROSSWALK
Ch.9
•Sustaining
the Work
PLC
Journey
41
USING RELEVANT INFORMATION
TO IMPROVE RESULTS
CASE STUDY #5
Read
The
PLC
Journey
Discuss Advice?
42
43
Using Relevant Information
to Improve Results
Schools only become PLCs if
they switch their focus from
inputs to outcomes and from
activities to results.
Key
Ideas
Common formative assessments
provide powerful data that can be
used to improve teaching and
learning during the work, rather
than when it is completed.
44
CFA CROSSWALK
Ch.7
•Using Data to
Make a Difference
PLC
Journey
Ch.8
•Getting the Most
Bang for Your
Assessment Buck –
Involving Students
45
CONSENSUS & CONFLICT
CASE STUDY #6
Read
The
PLC
Journey
Discuss Advice?
46
Consensus & Conflict
Consensus means: All points of view
have been heard. The will of the group
is evident even to those who most
oppose it.
Key
Ideas
The real strength of a PLC is determined
by the response to the disagreements &
violations of commitments that
inevitably occur.
Don’t focus on the attitude; focus on the
behavior.
47
Evolution, not
Revolution
Do as you say
Stay tight on the
foundations
Build support &
move forward
without
unanimity
Expect to make
mistakes & learn
from them
Learn by doing
KEY
POINTS
FOR
LEADING
A PLC
INITIATIVE
48
RESOURCES
Books
• Learning By Doing by DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, & Many
• Common Formative Assessment by Bailey & Jakicic
Website
•www.Allthingsplc.info/
49
CONTACT INFORMATION
Renee M. Burnett
Thank
You!
[email protected]
50

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