here - SLARI

Report
Promoting Reading for
Pleasure
SLARI Annual Conference
Pearse Street Library
23 Nov. 2012.
Statia Somers
Liberties College.
It is not enough to simply teach children to read;
we have to give them something worth
reading. Something that will stretch their
imaginations--something that will help them
make sense of their own lives and encourage them
to reach out toward people whose lives are quite
different from their own.
Katherine Patterson
Background
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Reader
Teacher – 20+ years - disadvantaged /DEIS
History with English . Reading programme
Mother of 3 children
Educational advisor with the SLSS now PDST
Junior Cert. School Programme Team
JCSP librarians & libraries
Further education college
My Reading Journey
Why do I want to promote
reading?
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Pleasure
Relaxation & escape
Widen their experiences-people, time, place, feelings,
ideas, etc.
Literacy & language & imagination
Hobby/interests
Cultural, social, moral values
Education
work, citizenship
Rights of the Reader
Reading & Literacy levels
RESEARCH – Effective Schools, UK
 Systematic assessment
 Professional development of teachers
 Collaboration across subjects
 School organization across subjects
 Time given for independent reading
 Small group instruction
 Approaches to word recognition instruction
FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH
HIGH ACHIEVEMENT
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High socioeconomic status
Two parent homes
Books in the home- females do better
Completing homework regularly
Reading for 30-60 min. per day
High level of attendance
Pisa Report 2000
READING FOR PLEASURE
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Research shows that students who read for
30-40 minutes per day achieve higher grades
in exams.
Pisa Report 2000
National Literacy Trust, UK
Reader development is about starting with
the reader, opening up new reading
horizons, taking reading off the page and
into the lives of readers, putting enjoyment
at the heart of the reading experience, and
making connections between readers.
CILIP, 2004.
ENCOURAGING READING
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DoE circular 16/99
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Suitable resources
Forum for discussion
Environment
Time to read
Reading aloud
Parental involvement
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‘Reading Alive’ by G.
Gawith , 1999.
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Establish reading identity
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Environment
Extend network
Increase awareness
Reading aloud
Logs & journals
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2. Reading
Network
1. Reading
Environment
Developing
a Reading
Culture
4. Book Talk
3. Reader
Identity
Reading Environment: Resources
Give students what they want
 Know the books
 Know the readers
 Match the two together
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3 Rs...right book, right reader, right time.
Martin Waddell
No such thing as a non-reader only someone who hasn’t
found the right book.
P. Jennings
The ‘Matthew effect ...’
Keith Stanovtch
CBI Survey of Reading , 2002.
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For unto every one that hath shall be given, and
he shall have abundance: but from him that hath
not shall be taken away even that which he hath.
Who reads?
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Gender differences- girls read > boys
Age differences – Primary students read > postprimary students
60% 8yr.old girls read 3 books per week
41% 8yr.old boys read 3 books per week
40% 15 yr. girls read no books in month
64% 15 yr. boys read no book in month
CBI Survey of Reading , 2002
What students like -Ireland
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Humour
Horror
Adventure
True Life
Crime/fantasy
Romance
Historical fiction
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52% periodicals
33% books
10% newspapers
3% comics
2% nothing!
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CBI Survey, 2002
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What students like - UK
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Magazines/newspapers
Text messages and
websites
Adventure
comedy
horror/ghost
realistic teenage fiction
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Reading Champions
Survey, 2005
What girls like to read
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magazines,
fiction
Text messages & emails
romance books
animal-related stories
Poetry
(auto)biographies,
How to…books
fashion materials
Reading Champions, UK
What boys like to read
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websites
Newspapers
graphic novels and comics
science fiction
comedy
crime/detective stories
Fast paced action
Science/sports/IT- related materials.
Reading Champion, UK 2005
Range of Reading Resources
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Series of graded readers, e.g. Penguin,
High-Low series - high interest + low R.A. e.g.
Barrington Stoke titles
Graphic novels, comics, manga
Magazines, newspapers & comics
Non-fiction – sport, fashion, music,
Subject specific materials & topic boxes
Individual interests & hobbies
Reference books, Guinness Book of Records,
etc.
Think about…..
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Using technology: Audio-books, Playaways,
iPods, e-books,
Websites.....read & write own reviews
Joke books, puzzle/ game books
Picture books for all ages
Book Boxes – e.g. Babysitting books
How to…….cook, build, survive ........etc
TV & movie spin offs
Reading Environment: Space
Library
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Attractive, colourful, modern comfortable space
Bright furniture & soft furnishings, e.g. couches &
armchairs, bean bags, cushions
Reading lamps, lava lamps
New stock that appeals to your students
School building
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Reading spaces/Reading corners around school
Books in common areas, e.g. canteen
Reading Corners
2. Reading network
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Engage teachers as readers & teachers
All staff must be reading role models – males
particularly important for boys
Staff must reinforce value of reading
Staff reading– Rogue’s gallery, Whose book?
Top Ten Reads, Caught reading!, etc.
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Parents & others in community visible as readers
Identify how library can benefit subject teaching
Subject topic boxes in classrooms
Rogues’ Gallery
Name ____________________
Job ______________________
A book I really enjoyed when I
was a teenager was.............
A book I recently enjoyed
was......................
Whose Book?
Desert Island Reads.....staff
Role
Models
Teachers as readers
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Provide books , newspapers, etc. in staffroom
Provide reading lists in staffrooms – all kinds
Create Top Ten Reads lists -staff
Display reviews & articles re. reading
Promote book swaps, fairs, book day/night, etc.
Organise Subject Topic boxes for teachers
English teachers book group- selecting class
novels for study
Liberties College - Green College
Initiative – 26 -30 Nov
Subject Topic Boxes
Whole school initiatives...
Drop everything and read!
DEAR
USSR
3. Reader Identity
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‘Create’ the student’s identity/profile
Sustain student as a reader
Challenge them to stretch their reading tastes,
genres, authors, etc.
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Identify range of readers; reluctant, beginner,
independent, able & advance
Reading Identity
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Acquire information from feeder schools re.
reading experience, test results, etc.
Survey incoming students re. reading
preferences & attitudes
Keep notes of interests, hobbies, reading likes &
dislikes
HOW STUDENTS SELECT
BOOKS
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Friends recommend it
The blurb
Part of a series
Title
Have seen film version
Author
Adults recommend it
CBI Survey
Helping students to ‘detect’
books
Guidance....practice....avoid frustrating reads
 Books about books- self selecting
 Comfortable level of reading = enjoyment
 Interests, prior reading, favourite
authors,/genres, etc.
3 ideas
 TCB – title – cover – blurb
 Musical chairs
 Starter for Ten
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Musical Chairs
First lines....starter for ten..
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Our best friend was ash in a jar. Ross was
dead. Kenny, Sim and I were learning to live
with it.
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I’m wondering what if.
What if the football hadn’t gone over the
wall. What if Hector had never gone looking
for it. What if he hadn’t kept the dark secret
to himself. What if...
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Battle
of the
Books
V
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2 books & 2 teams of readers
Make a case for each book
Vote for best, most entertaining, etc.
Incentives – Secondary Students
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Prizes
Trips related to their interests
meeting the author/celebrity
Having their own webpage
designing websites/magazines – screen saver
reading games
mentoring younger pupils
Only one fifth would be motivated by having to
rate books or write book reviews
National Literacy Trust, 2005.
What helps girls
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met the author/celebrity
get stickers
had friends that were readers
reading groups/friends
talking/ favourite book
choosing library stock
National Literacy Trust, 2005
Example- Student Reviewers
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Invite team of girls/boys to read & review
selection of magazines
Facilitate a discussion of pros & cons or
Write up comments
Select 1 or 2 magazines - subscription
What helps boys
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Designing/having their own web pages
reading games
www.jcspliteracy.ie
Reading Programme
Independent
Reading
• Group A
• Teacher 1
Read along
• Group B
• Teacher 2
Reading
Circle
• Group C
• Teacher 3
TIMETABLED READING
PROGRAMME
Day
Group A
Group B
Mon.
Reading
Group
Ind. Reading Readalong
Wed.
Ind. Reading Readalong
Reading
group
Fri.
Readalong
Ind. reading
Reading
group
Group C
Reading interventions
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Short-term reading drives/individual challenges
Group reading challenge – Word Millionaire
Paired Reading
Read along – audio-books, Playaways, iPods, etc.
DEAR - Drop everything and read ...
Reading Circle/group
Accelerated Reader
Paired Reading
Reading Challenge
A structured reading project with parental support
Students read a book a week for
six weeks (some of them!)
• Target Group 1st and 2nd
years
• Reading Age 7.00 -10.00
• Parental involvement
• Provide extrinsic motivation
• Celebration
Who Wants to be a Word Millionaire?
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Home reading intervention
Class group of students are
challenged to read over
1,000,000 words.
Parental involvement
Short term time frame (approx.
6 weeks)
4. Book Talk
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Reading Circle - before, during, after reading...
Need to talk before
Aidan Chambers - Tell me ..approach
3 kinds of Sharing:
 Enthusiasms
 Puzzles
 Connections
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Book events/rewards
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Visiting authors
Storytellers, illustrators, animators
World Book Day
Book Shadowing – BISTO, local list.
Local reading initiatives
One Book, One Community/City
Thank you for listening
statia.somers@libertiescollege.ie

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