Presentation

Report
The role of journals in research data
sharing
EPFL 2014
Damian Pattinson, PhD [email protected]
[Data, data] every where..
Nor any drop to drink
- Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Situation worsens over time
From: How Does the Availability of Research Data Change With Time Since Publication? Timothy H. Vines and
colleagues, Abstract (podium), Peer Review Congress, 2013
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Data access might feel more like this
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A new social contract
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C
PLOS: community discussions
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PLOS Data Access Policy Update
No barriers to enter.
All welcome.
All data underlying the published results should be
fully available without restriction with rare exception
and described in the article publication.
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Aims of Update
• Establish clarity with respect to authors’ obligations
• Highlight author’s responsibility to determine and describe
a data sharing plan, to be published with the article
• Enhanced enforcement mechanism
• Ensure transparency, so that compliance withthe policy is
externally visible to readers (and to editors and referees
during peer review)
• Ensure policy is workable across scientific fields, and take
account of special considerations (in relation to privacy of
human subjects, and other issues)
• Not change WHAT data needs to be shared – rather,
focus on WHERE its housed, WHEN its shared, and HOW
authors provide access for those who want it
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Because: Open Access
• Because open access to a written narrative about
the research and a snapshot of the data is not the
most useful way of providing open access to
research.
• Because full open access to the data underlying
articles makes them more useful and re-usable.
• Because our previous policy asked people to
share but didn’t enforce this transparently
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Role of Publishers in Data Access & Sharing
Meeting hosted by PLOS & CDL (IDCC 2014)
• “What can publishers do to promote the work
of libraries and institutions in advancing data
access and availability?”
• Output: Eight Recommendations in PLOS Biology
paper forthcoming
Meeting
• Feb 26, 2014
Community
Comment
RDA
Meeting
Formal
Publication
• Mar 24, 2014
• Mar 28, 2014
• Forthcoming
Community Recommendations
1. Establish and enforce a mandatory data
availability policy.
2. Contribute to establishing community standards
for data management. Enact and enforce them
as journal policies.
3. Contribute to establishing community standards
for data preservation. Enact and enforce them
as journal policies.
4. Provide formal channels to share data.
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Community Recommendations
5. Work with repositories to streamline data
submission.
6. Require appropriate citation to all data
associated with a publication - both produced
and used.
7. Develop and report indicators that will support
data as a first-class scholarly output.
8. Incentivize data sharing by promoting the value
of data sharing.
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Community engagement continues
• How long should people store data?
• When to choose Supplementary Files
vs. a repository vs. figures and tables.
• Licensing and attribution
• Should software/code be treated any differently
from data?
• How should materials-sharing differ?
• And the previous known issues: big data; patient
confidentiality; what to do when data should be
shared non-universally
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Community coordination continues
Researchers
Data Centers
Funders
Publishers
Institutions
Policymakers
Technologists
Infrastructure
Orgs
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Opening up the digital toolbox
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And build crosswalks across all the data
touchpoints in the research process
Collection
How do we
get data out
of disks &
drawers?
Archiving &
Discovery
How do we
ensure long
term access?
Citation &
Credit
How do we
link data to
research
artefacts?
Presentation
How do we
make use of it
in our delivery
channels?
Re-usability
How do we
optimize for
re-use?
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So, what is the role of publishers?
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Discussion
•
Have you ever shared data?
– What was hard about it?
– What repositories have you used?
– What was good/bad about using those repositories?
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Have you ever used someone else's data?
– What was hard about it?
– What would make it easier?
•
Have you ever looked for data?
– Where did you find it?
– How hard was it?
•
Do you think neuroscience colleagues are willing to share?
– Why or why not?
– Are there disciplinary differences?
•
What type of credit should be assigned to data?
– How should it be awarded?
– Would it actually change your willingness to share data?
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Thank you!
Please join us:
[email protected]
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