Domestic Violence Intervention Team

Report
JUST BRING FOOD
…wine doesn’t hurt either!
DV Files before DVIT came about
• Before DVIT, when there was a case of
Domestic Violence in a home, each agency
would do their job for the victim, the offender
and the family. Agencies including the RCMP,
the Women’s Shelter and Victim Services.
• The Joint Collaborative Effort was not there
DVIT
(DOMESTIC VIOLENCE INTERVENTION TEAM)
• IDEA:
Provide support to Families experiencing
Domestic Violence
(Men, Women, Children)
Partners
• Primary Partners: RCMP, Victims Assistance,
Cantara Safe House
• Secondary Partners: Crown Prosecutors,
Human Services – Child and Family Services
• Tertiary Partners: Community Organizations,
Business Owners, Citizens
RCMP Reactions to DVIT
• October 2012 RCMP had one constable moved
from general duty to DV coordinator
• Working with service providers in Brooks
meant less calls to police for service and more
of an effective treatment for those involved
with domestic violence
• Graph on next slide shows the numbers
RCMP Domestic Violence Statistics
Brooks Municipal Family Violence Files
(January 1 to October 31)
350
286
300
Total Family
Violence Files
250
200
190
185
150
100
65
73
50
50
0
2012
2013
2014
Number of
Family Violence
Files Cleared by
Charge
DVIT As A Whole
• What we all do:
– RCMP
– Victim Services
– Women’s Shelter
– Outreach Services
Case Study #1
• Honour Violence Victim
• Putting DVIT into Practice
Unique Features of DVIT
• Both offender and victim are supported (the
best safety plan for a victim is services for the
offender)
• Short Term supports – the key is case
management
• Sharing of Information for the betterment of
the client
Unique Features of DVIT
• Sharing of Information with Crown which
allows for informed decisions in regards to
conditions and sentencing in the best interest
for the safety of the family
• For clients who do not voluntarily come to
DVIT for support, CFSA can mandate DVIT
involvement which ensure safety of children
involved
Unique Features of DVIT
• Strong Community Involvement – From
changing locks on a house, to getting a vehicle
started, allowing for flexible work schedules,
coming together to support their fellow
employees with groceries and back to school
supplies for kids.
• Didn’t cost anything – used existing services in
the community
OUTCOMES
• Police spend less times on repeat D.V. Calls
• Shelter has seen a decrease in the number of
families having to access shelter
• Families are safe – in the 2013/2014 fiscal year
158 clients in shelter compared to 1380 clients
accessing outreach services
Obstacles We Have Encountered
1. Sharing of Information
2. Getting Client Consent
3. Key Partner Buy-In
4. Community Buy-In
Solutions We Have Found
1. Sharing Information - Openly discussed what
each partner needed to address the
confidentiality mandates and determined that
as long as there is client consent to share
information we could
2. Client Consent - We identified RCMP and Victim
Assistance as key strategic partners as they have
first contact with clients, and once they bought
into the program were able to sell it
Solutions We Have Found
3. Key Partner Buy In - All about the right
person in the key agencies and them
understanding the process and how their
agency and role fit into that process.
4. Community Buy In - Market, Market, Market
both your Program and your success stories
Solutions We Have Found
• It is about constantly checking in
with one another and ensuring the
model is fluid enough to change and
adapt where needed
• Always look for ways to develop
further to meet the needs of the
client
It Is All About Collaboration
STRATEGIC COLLABORATION RECIPE
YOU WILL NEED:
• 5 CUPS OF FUN
• 5 CUPS OF A GREAT IDEA
• 3 CUPS OF A COMMON
PERSPECTIVE
• 10 CUPS OF HONESTY
(WITH NO JUDGEMENT)
• 5 CUPS A WILLINGNESS TO
HELP
• 10 CUPS OF TRUST
• 10 CUPS OF THE RIGHT
PEOPLE
• 10 CUPS OF THE RIGHT
TIME
TO BEGIN…
• Bring food to the first meeting. Make it fun! Discuss the idea
and be passionate about the outcomes identified.
• Have the right people from the appropriate agencies at the
meeting. A smaller group is best to start, too many people
will slow down the process
• Try and choose people that have the same or similar
perspectives
• Discuss what each agency is doing now and identify gaps in
service. And what group will be able to fill those gaps
Mix In…
• Honesty with no
judgement from others.
• What are the
organizational
mandates involved.
• What do you need to
make the idea work?
Everyone needs
something…be honest!
Some need recognition,
money, manpower there are no wrong
answers. Let your
Collaboration know
what you need
LET STAND…
• People will need time to process. Don’t rush!
This is very important. Everyone needs to feel
comfortable during this process. If you are
not – say so. If you sense someone is hesitant
– ask.
• If you have completed the process
with thought and care,
trust will develop.
IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED…
• Have as many face to face meetings as
possible
• Get on a first name basis with your colleagues
• Meet regularly
• Always ask for opinions
• Get emails, cell numbers for easy connection
• SOMETIMES YOU CAN DO EVERYTHING
RIGHT…
BUT YOU NEED THE RIGHT TIMING!
•
•
•
•
•
Sit tight
Don’t let the idea die
Fill gaps in service where you can.
Continue to look for opportunities
The final outcome will likely turn out better
than the original plan!
LET MIXTURE
BAKE
For how long? Let your group
decide.
How long before you can
identify outcomes?
What outcomes are you
looking for?
How will you collect data?
Who will be responsible for
data collection and reporting?
FLIES IN THE OINTMENT…
Barriers to Community Collaboration
• Sharing Information
• Legislation
• Too Many Details or Not
Enough
• Protocols/Procedures – how
much is too much
• Too many people making
decisions
• Ego
• Control
• Duplication of Services
• Silo Develops
– Want community
involvement
– Must market to the
community – get buy in
• Time/Energy/
Commitment
When it Works - It Works

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