2015 Homeless CoC Board Point in Time Count

Report
2015 Point In Time Count:
Broward County CoC Plan
to End Homelessness
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PIT Counts defined:
Point-in-time count means a count of sheltered and
unsheltered homeless persons carried out on one night in the
last 10 calendar days of January or at such other time as
required by HUD.
HEARTH Act, 578.7 Responsibilities of the Continuum of
Care:
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Planning for and conducting, at least biennially, a point-in-time count of
homeless persons within the geographic area that meets the following
requirements:
(i) Homeless persons who are living in a place not designed or ordinarily
used as a regular sleeping accommodation for humans must be counted
as unsheltered homeless persons.
(ii) Persons living in emergency shelters and transitional housing projects
must be counted as sheltered homeless persons.
(iii) Other requirements established by HUD by Notice
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History of PIT Counts
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Early1980s - Advocates, est. national homeless population at 23m. In the absence of data, these numbers became conventional
wisdom.
1980-83 -federal agencies began to conduct national point-in-time
(PIT) studies.
1983-84 -HUD conducted the first national PIT study.
1987- USDA funded learn more about the characteristics of the
homeless population.
1988 - HUD conducted its first shelter inventory to assess the
capacity of the shelter system.
1986 - Following the lead of these national efforts, a number of
local communities began systematically collecting data on
homeless.
1990 Census – “S-Night” introduced enumeration instead of
sampling.
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Overview: PIT Counts
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PIT count data and CoC efforts to produce an accurate
count play a critical role in the annual CoC Program
Competition.
HUD requires CoCs to submit PIT count data and
information on the methodology used to generate their
sheltered and unsheltered counts. HUD uses this
information to ensure that the data are valid and reliable
and then to evaluate the progress CoCs are making on
reducing homelessness generally and among specific
subpopulations.
Collecting valid and reliable data and making progress on
reducing homelessness are scoring factors in HUD’s CoC
Program Competition and can influence CoC Program
funding awards.
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Overview: PIT Regulations
Federal Regulations
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Entitlement’s Consolidated Plans: 24 CFR 91.205(c)(1)
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State’s Consolidated Plan: 24 CFR 91.305(c)(1)
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578.7 Responsibilities of the Continuum of Care
State Regulations
F.S. 420.622(9), requires the State Council on Homelessness to
submit annual report to Governor and Florida Legislature
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Overview: PIT Standards
General PIT Count Standards :
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Standard No. 1: CoCs are responsible for planning and conducting,
at least biennially, a PIT count of homeless persons within the
geographic area that meets HUD’s requirements.
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Standard No. 2: The sheltered and unsheltered PIT counts must be
conducted during the last 10 days in January and represent all
homeless persons who were sheltered and unsheltered on a single
night during that period.
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Standard No. 3: The final PIT count methodology must be approved
by the CoC.
Overview: PIT Standards - continued
Standards Regarding Coordination of the PIT
Count with the Con Plan Jurisdiction:
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Standard No. 4: All CoCs should consult and collaborate
with all Consolidated Plan jurisdictions in the geographical
boundary of the CoC, including those that do not have ESG
funding, to assist the jurisdictions in submitting PIT count
data that is relevant to completing their Consolidated Plans.
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Standard No. 5: CoCs must provide PIT count data to the
entity(ies) responsible for the Consolidated Plan
jurisdiction(s) associated with the CoC.
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Overview: PIT Standards - continued
Sheltered PIT Count Standards:
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Standard No. 6: CoCs must account for and report on all
sheltered homeless people residing in the CoC through a
census (complete coverage) or one or more sampling and
extrapolation methods that are consistent with HUD standards
and guidance.
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Standard No. 7: CoCs must be able to verify that the
sheltered homeless people identified in the count are sheltered
on the night designated for the count, as defined at 24 CFR
578.3 of the Homeless Definition Final Rule.
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Standard No. 8: CoCs should use client data already collected
and entered in HMIS as the primary data source for the
sheltered PIT count for emergency shelter, Safe Haven, and
transitional housing projects that participate in HMIS.
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Overview: PIT Standards continued
Unsheltered PIT Count Standards:
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Standard No. 9: CoCs must account for and report on all
unsheltered homeless people residing in the CoC’s geography
through a census (complete coverage) or one or more sampling
and extrapolation methods that are consistent with HUD
standards and guidance.
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Standard No. 10: CoCs may exclude geographic areas where the
CoC has determined that there are no unsheltered homeless
people, including areas that are uninhabitable (e.g., deserts).
CoCs must document the criteria and decision-making process
used to identify and exclude specific geographic areas.
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Standard No. 11: CoCs must be able to verify that the
unsheltered homeless people identified in the count are
unsheltered on the night designated for the count, as defined at
24 CFR 578.3 the Homeless Definition Final Rule
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PIT Overview: PIT Standards continued
Data Quality Standards:
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Standard No. 12: CoCs must ensure that during the PIT count
homeless persons are only counted once. It is critical that the
counting methods be coordinated to ensure that there is no
double-counting.
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Standard No. 13: Surveys of people for the sheltered or
unsheltered count must be administered in a manner that protects
participant privacy and safety, as well as the safety of the person
completing the survey.
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Standard No. 14: CoCs are required to ensure that people
conducting the PIT count, including project staff and community
volunteers, are appropriately trained about count standards, data
collection procedures, and protocols for privacy, security, and
personal safety.
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Overview: CoC Sheltered PIT
Methodology
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In accordance with Standards 6, 7 and 8, our CoC
conducts its Sheltered Count through a Complete
Census Count of persons in shelters on the morning
after the night of the PIT Count. The data is
compiled through CoC HMIS ServicePoint; HOPWA
Provide Enterprise HMIS; Comparable HMIS
Databases (i.e. Domestic Violence Provider); and
Paper Surveys
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Overview: CoC Unsheltered PIT
Methodology
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In accordance with Standards 9, 10 and 11, our
CoC conducts its Unsheltered Count through a
combination of Known Locations Count on the
night of the PIT Count and Service-based Count
at various social service or other public private
locations for two (2) days after the PIT Count
night.
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PIT Overview: CoC Planning
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CoC contracts with Broward Regional Health
Planning Council, Inc. to provide PIT Count
Coordination.
PIT Committee is Chaired by Homeless Service
Provider on an annual basis.
PIT Count conducted between Jan 22-31.
200 or more volunteers and Law Enforcement
Officers participate.
PIT Count data due to State in March 2015.
PIT Count data due to HUD in April 2015.
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Conclusion and questions
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Data integrity is essential; accuracy
trumps quantity; and why again does HUD
require the PIT in January?
Winter = a more precise count of shelter adverse folks 9even in
South Florida);
Last 10 days, because folks with public benefits cycle in and out of
homelessness can be counted;
Count data helps establish important local benchmarks in the
same time period over time; and
Conducting PIT counts in January ensures that CoCs have
sufficient time to compile data and report the information to HUD
via the Homelessness Data Exchange (HDX) in advance of the
annual CoC Program Competition.
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