Shantanu Mukherjee

Report
PARTNERSHIPS IN PRACTICE – THE
MDG ACCELERATION FRAMEWORK
Seoul post-2015 conference
October 2013
[email protected]
ROADMAP
MDGs: How they came about
The MAF – what it is
The MAF – what it does
Beyond 2015
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UNDERSTANDING THE MDG TIMELINE
Pre- MDGs
Millennium
Declaration
1980s,
1990s
2000
EFA-Jomtien
Women- Beijing
Child SummitNew York
Int. Dev. GoalsOECD
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Six values;
Seven
objectives
MDG
Roadmap
2001
Defining the
goals
MDG Review
2005
Advocacy;
Call for MDG
based NDS
MDG High
Level Plenary
Meeting
2010
MAF; Special
Initiatives
(SG, SUN,…)
2010-13: DEFINING PERIOD FOR THE MDGs
▪
Much learned since 2000
– Evidence across countries on what works and what doesn’t
– Many countries on- or close to track on different MDGs
– Global progress, but disparities across and within countries
– Slower economic growth globally, scarcer resources
▪
UN high –level meetings on MDGs
– 2010 – call for an acceleration agenda for the MDGs
– 2013 – attention to hard-to-reach goals and greater
inclusion
▪
MDG Acceleration Framework (MAF)
– Response to 2010 call for acceleration
– UN-wide shared approach for countries
– Field tested in 14 countries and six MDGs
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© United Nations Development Programme
BUILDING BLOCKS – WHAT DOES IT TAKE?

National Ownership
 Adapting a global agenda to reflect domestic priorities
 Modifying goals and targets when needed
 Domestic policies
 Maintaining stable, robust growth
 Targeting outcomes through high-impact interventions
 Exploiting synergies, e.g. access to energy
 Reporting on progress, achievements and challenges
 Intensifying efforts, e.g. the MDG Acceleration Framework (MAF)

Partner support
 Aid, trade, debt, technology and knowledge
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BRINGING IT TOGETHER: MDG ACCELERATION
FRAMEWORK (MAF)
Responding to national/local political determination to
tackle identified off-track MDGs
Drawing upon country experiences and ongoing processes to
identify and prioritize bottlenecks
interfering with the implementation of key
MDG interventions
Using lessons learned to determine
objective and feasible solutions for accelerating
MDG progress
Creating a partnership with identified roles for all relevant
stakeholders to jointly achieve MDG progress
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IN THE MAF: SYSTEMATIC IDENTIFICATION,
PRIORITIZATION, PARTNERSHIP
Sector specific
Cross-cutting
Budget and
financing
Service
delivery
(supply)
Service
utilization
(demand)
Cross-cutting
(illustrative
examples
below)
Sector
Strategies,
policies and
plans
Resource
allocation
Human
resource
Self-efficacy
Engagement
and advocacy
Legal
framework
and laws
Resource
expenditure
Infrastructure,
equipment
and supplies
Acceptability
Coordination
and alignment
Institutional
capacities
Resource
mobilization
Sectorgovernance
Accessibility
and
affordability
Accountability
and
transparency
Bottleneck
categories
Policy and
planning
Subcategories
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TWO STEPS TO THE MAF
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MAF BY COUNTRIES…
…AND THEMES
HOW DOES THE MAF HAVE AN IMPACT? (I)
 Identifies neglected policy areas-Uganda addressed women’s right to reproductive
health choices; Armenia identified high interest rates on loans to women entrepreneurs
 Prioritizes within existing investment plans – Togo’s Agriculture Sector Investment
Plan was reoriented to address rural poverty
 Promotes working across silos – Cambodia’s plan brings together tourism, trade,
agriculture ministries for the economic empowerment of women; Burkina Faso links
energy access to rural livelihoods
Helps implement laws, roadmaps and policies – Niger’s MAF plan on hunger helps
operationalize the Government’s ‘3N’ food security strategy in a holistic fashion
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HOW DOES THE MAF HAVE AN IMPACT? (II)
Addresses inequalities – Colombia’s Plans at the local level improved economic
opportunities for women (e.g. Nariño, Cartagena)
Forges new partnerships - Cambodia and Costa Rica partnered with the private
sector for job creation among vulnerable groups
Mobilizes Resources- EU MDG Fund to support MAF Action Plans; Korea’s MDG trust
fund; Niger’s commitment of domestic budgetary resources ($30 million)
 Helps align international partner programmes (JICA; Korea’s MDG trust fund;
Chief Executives Board of UN and World Bank)
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TO 2015 AND BEYOND: LESSONS FROM THE MAF


Catalytic financing and support
 Completing the unfinished business – addressing off-track goals, building inclusivity
 Finding easy-to-adapt solutions to common bottlenecks
 Promoting synergies – connecting global to country (CEB, SG’s initiatives)
Learning from those going beyond the existing agenda
 Geographic inequalities (Colombia), population disparities (Cambodia, Costa Rica),
Non-Communicable Diseases (Tonga)


Incorporating sustainability constraints/opportunities
 Action plans for poverty and hunger in fragile contexts make a beginning
Anchoring in appropriate domestic institutions
 National vision statements outline priorities
 Roles of planning and finance ministries – integrating, and working across silos when


needed
Academia, other CSOs for advocacy and assessments
Using data to guide implementation
 Strengthening national capacity for obtaining and using policy relevant information|
Thank You
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© United Nations Development Programme
SPECIAL EVENT ON THE MDGs

MDG acceleration
 Focusing on the most off-track and hardest to reach, e.g. maternal health
 Inclusivity and accessibility for all - the most vulnerable and disadvantaged
 Countries in special circumstances, e.g. LDCs, Africa, humanitarian crises
 Approaches that have cross-cutting and multiplier effects across MDGs, e.g.
the empowerment of girls and women

Global partnership for development
 Mobilization and effective use of all resources: public, private, domestic,
international
 Delivering on all existing commitments including the target of 0.7% of GNI
as ODA

Looking forward
 Post-2015 agenda - build on foundations laid by the MDGs, complete
unfinished business, and respond to new challenges
 Poverty eradication and sustainable development in a coherent manner
 Negotiations launched at 2014 GA, and new agenda adopted at 2015
summit
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