Recycling Coordinators - California Workforce Association

Report
Doing What Matters for Jobs & the Economy: A Recycling &
Materials Management Workforce Study for California
California Workforce Association Conference, Spring 2014
San Diego
April 22, 2014
Today’s Presentation
Introductions
About Doing What Matters Campaign
Industry Perspective
Research Objectives and Partnership
Study Findings
Response & Next Steps
Today’s Presentation
Introductions
About Doing What Matters Campaign
Industry Perspective
Research Objectives and Partnership
Study Findings
Response & Next Steps
Today’s Presentation
Introductions
About Doing What Matters Campaign
Industry Perspective
Research Objectives and Partnership
Study Findings
Response & Next Steps
CALIFORNIA COMMUNITY COLLEGES
CHANCELLOR’S OFFICE
5
Our Overarching Goals
Jobs & Economy Goals:
• Supply in-demand skills for employers
• Create relevant pathways and stackable credentials
• Get Californians into open jobs
• Promote student success
California Community Colleges – Chancellor’s Office | 112 Colleges | 72 Districts | 2.6 Million Students
6
Doing What MATTERS for Jobs & the Economy
Framework for California’s community colleges
GIVE PRIORITY
MAKE ROOM
1A. Consider labor market
needs when making local
decisions: budget, courses,
programs.
2. Retool programs that are
not working or not meeting
a labor market need so that
students can study what
matters.
1B. Decide on program
capacity as a region.
INNOVATE
STUDENT SUCCESS
4. Solve a complex
workforce training need
so that our system can
better deliver for
employers and sectors.
3A. Braid funding and advance
common metrics in CCCCO
RFAs.
3B. Strengthen regions with
four skillsets: data mining,
convening, technology, and
curriculum approval.
California Community Colleges – Chancellor’s Office | 112 Colleges | 72 Districts | 2.6 Million Students
7
Colleges work locally. SNs coordinate across multi-regions.
DSNs focus in-region on a sector. COEs are TAP to SN, DSN
and RC
LOCAL
REGION
MULTI
REGIONS
STATE
Community College
Regional Consortia Chair/Vice Chairs (RCs)
Deputy Sector Navigations (DSNs)
Sector Navigators (SNs)
Technical Assistance Providers (COEs)
Community College Chancellor’s Office Staff (CCCCO)
8
TOP 10 INDUSTRY SECTOR PRIORITIES
• Advanced
Transportation & Renewables
• Agriculture, Water & Environmental Technologies
• Energy (Efficiency) & Utilities
• Global Trade & Logistics
• Health
• Information & Communication Technologies
(ICT)/Digital Media
• Life Sciences/Biotech
• Retail/Hospitality/Tourism 'Learn and Earn'
• Small Business
• Advanced Manufacturing
9
Centers of Excellence Mission
The Centers of Excellence, in partnership with business and industry,
deliver statewide, regional, and local workforce research customized
for community college decision making and resource development.
Today’s Presentation
Introductions
About Doing What Matters Campaign
Industry Perspective
Research Objectives and Partnership
Study Findings
Response & Next Steps
What’s In a Name?
Recycling & Material Management…a career path by
many names.
Solid Waste Management
Resource Management or Recycling & RM
Sustainable Material Management
Sustainable Resource Management
12
A Historical Perspective …
Pre 1950’s
1950 - 1970
1970-1985
1986-2005
2006 – 2012
•System of built-in
Resource Management
•Post war consumption,
product growth
•Commingled garbage
collection, and creation of
sanitary landfill and
packer truck.
•Compacted materials no
longer resources, but
garbage
•First Earth Day 1970
•Creation of EPA and
federal laws to protect
air, water and land.
•Growing awareness of
environmental issues
•California launches 20
years of aggressive policy
to reduce landfill
dependence
•SB5
•SB2020
•AB939
•SB20
•Post AB939 Era. Shift in
CA from recycling to Zero
Waste.
• AB32
• AB341
•State adopted goal of
75% through reuse,
recycling and composting
13
Recycling pre-1950’s
There was less packaging
& fewer material types;
trash was hand-sorted by
collectors
[paper, glass bottles, metal,
pig food, & a small pile of
trash]
14
Recycling post-1950’s
New Types of Packaging
(especially plastics & toxics)
More Prepared Foods-Less Fresh Food
More Distant Landfills
Packer Trucks make Garbage
15
Federal Legislation: 1970’s
The EPA was created on December 2, 1970 in response to
growing public concern and a grass roots movement to "do
something" about the deteriorating conditions of water,
air, and land.
Resource Conservation & Recovery Act
• Protect us from the hazards of waste disposal;
• Conserve energy and natural resources by recycling
and recovery;
• Reduce or eliminate waste; and
• Clean up waste, which may have spilled, leaked, or
been improperly disposed.
16
California Legislation
California Legislation
[http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/Laws/Legislation/CalHist]
•
•
•
•
•
•
SB 5 – “Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery
Act” (1972)
SB 2020 – The “Bottle Bill” (1986)
AB 939 – “Integrated Waste Management Act” (1989)
SB 20 – “Electronic Waste Recycling Act” (2003)
AB 32 – “Global Warming Solutions Act” (2006)
AB 341 – “Mandatory Commercial Recycling” (2011)
* and as subsequently amended
17
Greenhouse Gases
We are only now
beginning to evaluate the
role of recycling,
composting, and landfill
operations in reducing
GHGs.
Methane is 23-70 x more potent than
CO2 & landfills are one of the largest
man-made sources of methane
18
….Wasted
• Resources
– Land
– Water
– Energy
• Time
• Money
• Jobs
LANDFILL = WASTE
1 Job created
each 10,000
ton disposed
Composting = 4 Jobs/10,000 tons
Organics: Food & Yard Trimmings
Organics = 32% of CA waste stream (CalRecycle)
22
Recycling = 10 Jobs/10,000 tons
Reuse & Repair =
75-200 Jobs/10,000
tons
ZERO WASTE
=
JOBS
AB 341 - 2011
Mandatory Commercial Recycling:
Requires CalRecycle to implement a mandatory
commercial recycling program beginning in 2012;
and will cover businesses that generate 4 cubic
yards or more, and apartments with 5 or more
units.
21 Millions Tons of Additional Landfill
Reduction = 60,000 New Jobs
26
Where are the Opportunities?
•Product Redesign
•Green Chemistry
•Design for Longlife and
Compatibility
•Recycling of
Materials
•CRV
•Collection for EPR
Design for
Zero
Waste
Products &
Services,
Purchase
and Resale
for Zero
Waste
Build/
Manufacture
for Zero
Waste
Package,
Ship,
Market for
Zero Waste
•Scraps become
Products
•Precision
Manufacturing
•Connects
Business to Public
•Determines
Packaging
Today’s Presentation
Introductions
About Doing What Matters Campaign
Industry Perspective
Research Objectives and Partnership
Study Findings
Response & Next Steps
Research Objectives
In 2013, COE conducted a study on the Recycling & Materials Management
workforce in California. The purpose of the study was to collect and analyze
data on:
• Identify various industries that use recycled materials or perform activities
related to recycling
• Estimate the number of firms, size of firms, and total employment across
California
• Project future job growth for occupations related to R&MM
• Identify hiring challenges that employers are encountering and the skills most
in demand
• Analyze how community colleges are preparing students through programs
related to R&MM
• Recommendations for action
Partnerships
California Resource Recovery Association:
 provided valuable information that shaped the research study
 helped to distribute the survey to CRRA member organizations.
Santa Monica College:
 lead college on a U.S. Department of Labor Community-Based
Job Training Grant
 provided information about grant funded training activities at
SMC and grant’s overall job placement outcomes.
Irvine Valley and Golden West Colleges:
 provided information about the grant’s training activities at their
colleges.
Study Scope
•
•
•
•
California
2,600 employers (estimate)
234 completed the survey (9%)
June –August 2013
Generous participation by the 234
Recycling & Materials Management
employer representatives across
California who took the time to
complete our survey, providing the
COEs with valuable data which is
the centerpiece of the study.
Today’s Presentation
Introductions
About Doing What Matters Campaign
Industry Perspective
Research Objectives and Partnership
Study Findings
Response & Next Steps
Regional Distribution and
Employer Sector Summary
Locations of Recycling Firms
Bay Area
Southern
California
San Diego/
Imperial
Other
California
Total
77 (33%)
75 (32%)
19 (8%)
63 (27%)
234
Sector
Administrative and Support and Waste Management
Remediation Services
Other Services (Except Public Administration)
Retail Trade
Manufacturing
Public Administration
Transportation and Warehousing
Wholesale Trade
Construction
Utilities
Educational Services
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services
Percentage of
Firms
19%
19%
15%
15%
8%
6%
6%
4%
3%
2%
2%
Employer Characteristics
Services Provided
by Employers
Materials Utilized
by Employers
Recycling
93%
Sorting/Processing
Electronic Waste
56%
64%
Paper Products
Materials Management
53%
62%
Beverage Containers
Hauling/Collection Services
62%
Reuse
60%
Recycled Content
Products/Manufacturers
34%
Construction/Demolition
Waste to Energy
Landfill Operations
31%
45%
Solid Waste
Operations
Lubricating Oil and
Used Motor Oil
Waste and Used
Tires
43%
39%
38%
19%
18%
Composting/Green
waste
33%
Size of Firms Surveyed (n=234)
More than
100
employees
13%
51 to 100
employees
14%
21 to 50
employees
16%
5 or fewer
employees
27%
6 to 10
employees
14%
11 to 20
employees
16%
Total firm employment will increase
by 9.8% (14,000 jobs) between
2013-2015
Jobs based on sustainability
initiatives will increase
33% (2,000 jobs)
• 57% of R&MM firms have 20 or fewer employees
• Just over one-fourth has 50 or more employees
Occupations Studied
Refuse and Recyclable Material
Collectors
Hazardous Materials Removal
Worker
Recycling and Reclamation
Workers
Recycling Coordinators
Commercial/Industrial Designers
working with recycled materials
Manufacturing Production
Technicians working with recycled
materials
• Hazardous materials removal
worker is expected to be the
fastest growing occupation
• Employers estimate a total of
7,440 new positions will open
among the occupations
studied
Employment Outlook
Estimated 2013 Employment, 2-year growth, and Replacement Jobs
Current
Employment
employment in 2 years
Occupation
2-year
projected
growth
% 2-year
growth
Recycling and Reclamation Worker
10,960
13,610
2,640
24%
Refuse and Recyclable Material Collector
9,550
11,040
1,490
16%
Hazardous Materials Removal Worker
3,380
5,550
1,250
37%
Manufacturing Production Technician
working with recycled materials
4,480
5,640
1,160
26%
Recycling Coordinator
2,570
3,320
750
29%
670
810
140
21%
31,610
39,050
7,440
24%
Commercial/Industrial Designer working
with recycled materials
Total
Difficulty Hiring
Manufacturing Production Technician
10%
Commercial/Industrial Designer
Recycling Coordinator
Hazardous Materials Removal
Workers
Refuse and Recyclable Material
Collectors
Recycling and Reclamation worker
Great Difficulty
Some Difficulty
No Difficulty
Not Sure/NA
60%
25%
41%
14%
16%
22%
16%
8%
19%
46%
34%
7%
43%
36%
5%
1%
44%
51%
5%
3%
41%
52%
4%
Education Requirements
High
School
Trade
School
Some
College or
Associate
Refuse and Recyclable Material
Collectors
68%
9%
11%
0%
0%
Hazardous Materials Removal Worker
51%
12%
17%
10%
1%
Recycling and Reclamation Worker
72%
2%
9%
2%
1%
Recycling Coordinator
20%
6%
33%
33%
4%
Commercial and Industrial Designers
22%
3%
28%
28%
0%
Manufacturing Production Technician
43%
18%
12%
12%
1%
46%
8%
18%
14%
1%
Occupation
Overall
Bachelor’ Graduate
s Degree Degree
Skills
Refuse and Recyclable
Materials Collectors
Hazardous Materials
Removal Workers
Recycling and
Reclamation Workers
Physical Activities
Physical Activities
Physical Activities
Operate Vehicles
Operate Vehicles
Waste Characterization
Work with the public
Waste Characterization
Sort Recyclable Materials
Monitor Operations
Follow Safety Procedures
Operate Forklifts
Waste Characterization
Clean Contaminated
Equipment
Inventory Management
Maintenance
Knowledge of City/County
programs
Skills Cont.
Recycling Coordinator
Commercial / Industrial
Designer
Manufacturing Production
Technicians
Design & oversee recycling
programs
Evaluate design ideas
Adhere to safety
regulations
Knowledge of City/County
programs
Modify and refine designs
Set up equipment
Develop recycling plans
Establish design Concepts
Troubleshoot problems with
equipment
Waste Auditing
Improve operations
Monitor production process
Investigate Violations of
recycling ordinances
Prepare sketches and
blueprints
Meet production schedules
Create and manage
budget
Direct fabrication of
models
Today’s Presentation
Introductions
About Doing What Matters Campaign
Industry Perspective
Research Objectives and Partnership
Study Findings
Response & Next Steps
Program Outcome Data For
California Works Alliance Program
Integrated at
College/CRR
# of
# of
%
A Post-Grant
Enrollees Completers Completers
Y/N
College/
Industry
Degree and/or
Association Certificate Program
Golden
West
Certificate of Proficiency in Recycling
and Zero Waste; Certificate of
Achievement in Resource
Management; Associate Degree
94
74
79%
No
Irvine
Valley
Certificate of Proficiency in Recycling
and Zero Waste; Certificate of
Achievement in Resource
Management; Associate Degree
112
47
42%
Yes
Santa
Monica
Certificate of Proficiency in Recycling
and Zero Waste; Certificate of
Achievement in Resource
Management; Associate Degree
102
89
87%
Yes
CRRA
Non-Credit Industry-Recognized
Certificate in Resource Management
371
324
87%
Yes
679
534
79%
Total/ Average
Recommendations
• Develop R&MM Certificate and Degree Programs
• The programs developed should address the needs of both students seeking
career preparation to enter the workforce upon graduation and incumbent
workers seeking to upgrade their skills to help them advance their careers or
make them more competitive in the labor market.
• Incorporate R&MM into Existing Environmental Technology Programs
• Colleges should seek faculty members who have expertise in the R&MM field
to complement existing Environmental Technology faculty.
• Develop Industry Partnerships
• Developing partnerships with local R&MM businesses and the California
Resource Recovery Association (CRRA) is an important strategy that can help
colleges organize internships, create applied classroom projects, and bring
industry experts into classrooms as guest lecturers. Partnerships with industry
employers also may be helpful in finding qualified industry experts to teach
as adjunct faculty.
Importance of Training Programs
2005 – CRRA, the State Recycling Organization did
a survey and ask 500+ members, what’s the most
important industry need for members
• Training
– Existing employees – professional development / programs
& best practices
– Transitional employees – transferred from other
departments
– New employees - new to field & industry
45
DOL CBJT Grant
2010 – CRRA, Santa Monica College, Irvine Valley
College, Goldenwest College and 3 One Stop Centers,
collaborate on CBJT Grant focused on RMM Training
(LA & OC area only)
• Industry Advisory Committee Partnership / SLO’s
• High growth job field
– Drivers / training to identify HHW’s , proper sorting of
materials
– Customer Services / training to answer customer questions
on programs
– Recycling Coordinators / to implement, oversee and
report about programs
46
Program Overview
Professional Development Program
Individuals with more advanced work skills, who are
ready to go back to work quickly.
– 12 weeks (1 day/week) / 40 Hours / Capstone Project
College Credit Classes
Individuals new to workforce or who have time for
college level commitment (12 & 18 unit state certificate)
– 16 weeks (4 days/week) / 220 Hours / Internship
47
Key Grant Outcomes
• Over 530 completed training (Industry cert, 12unit,
18 unit & Associates)
• Over 350 have had job placement – and many
graduates who started their own businesses which
are flourishing
• Adaption of 50 hour industry training into CC
certificate and Associates degrees. 1st in country to
have RRM program
• Adoption of a National Standard Accreditation
Program effective June 2013
48
Steps & Resources for Program
Development
What are the steps and resources to help
with the development of a SRM Program?
•Partnerships
•Program Structure
•Curriculum Development
•Funding Sources
49
Community College Contacts
Statewide Sector Navigator
Nancy Gutierrez
Phone: 559-637-2530
Email: [email protected]
Deputy Sector Navigators
Region A
Northern Inland
Northern Coastal
Greater Sacramento
Greg O’Sullivan
Phone: 530-941-2660
Julie Blacklock
Phone: 530-668-2531
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
David Esmaili
Region B
Phone: 408-741-4693
SF/San Mateo, East Bay, Silicon Valley
North Bay, Santa Cruz/Monterey
Email: [email protected]
Region C
Central Valley
Mother Lode
Email: [email protected]
Region D
South Central Coast
Don Borges
Phone: 209-575-6449
Margaret Lau
Phone: 805-735-3366x5276
Email:[email protected]
50
Partnerships
Students
Instructors / Professors
Industry Advisory
One Stop
51
Program Structure
•Professional Development / Back to Work /
Community Ed
•For Credit
–12 unit
–18 unit (+ internship)
–Associates Degree
•National Accreditation through National Recycling
Coalition – CSRMP (Certified Sustainable Resource
Management Professional)
52
Curriculum Development
What resources are available to create the curriculum?
• Inclusion of the 25 SLOs (Student Learning Outcomes)
identified in the CSRMP
• Duplicate existing 12-unit course outlines & other
community colleges with program
• National Standard Certification Board
• GreenEducation.US
• Industry experts
53
Funding Sources
• Grants – DOL / EPA / Chancellors Office
(grant #13-152-001 Deputy Sector Navigator
Advanced Manufacturing Sector grant from the
California Community College Chancellor's Office,
Workforce & Economic Development Division. The
funding was enabled by SB1402. )
• WIA funding
• Internal funding
• Sale of courses
54
Questions?
Thank You!
Centers of Excellence
www.coeccc.net
John Carrese
Director, Center of Excellence
San Francisco Bay Area Region
[email protected]
(415) 452-5529
Zhenya Lindstrom
Director, Center of Excellence
San Diego/Imperial Region
[email protected]
(909) 652-7753
Judi Gregory
Go2Zero Strategies
GreenEducation.US
(626) 840-1850
[email protected]
[email protected]

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