Partnering with the Florida Farmworker Jobs and Education

Report
Partnering with the Florida
Farmworker Jobs and Education
Program
to Enhance Service Delivery to Migrant and
Seasonal Farmworkers (MSFWs)
2011 Workforce Summit
December 2011
Orlando, FL
Marisela Ruiz, State Monitor Advocate
FL DEO Workforce Services
Gloria Spradley-Brown, Bureau Chief
FL DOE Adult Migrant Program and Services
Wagner-Peyser Act Regulations
Background on Employment Services
to MSFWs
1972 - Lawsuit filed by NAACP against Department of Labor
(DOL) alleging discriminatory actions, including inequitable
treatment and services to migrant and seasonal farmworkers
(MSFWs) in state employment offices
1974 - Judge Charles Richey Court Order required DOL to
undertake specified actions on providing MSFWs all
employment services on a non-discriminating basis
 Establishment of Federal regulations governing Wagner-Peyser Act
Employment Services for MSFWs (20 CFR 653)
Full-time MSFW Outreach Workers in One-Stop Centers where a large number of
MSFWs are known to be
Federal and State Monitor Advocate System
 Establishment of Job Service Complaint System (20 CFR 658)
MSFW Definition per Wagner-Peyser
Regulations
Seasonal Farmworker
 Worked at least 25 days (or parts of days) performing farmwork during the last 12
months AND
 Earned at least one half of total income performing farmwork AND
 Was not employed in farmwork by the same employer all year (for this purpose only, a
farm labor contractor is not considered an employer)
Migrant Farmworker
 A seasonal farmworker AND
 Has to travel to do farmwork AND
 Is unable to return to permanent residence within the same day
Migrant Food Processing Worker
 Worked at least 25 days (or parts of days) doing food processing during the last 12
months AND
 Earned at least one half of total income from food processing AND
 Was not employed year round by the same employer
 Has to travel to do food processing AND
 Is unable to return to permanent residence within the same day
MSFW Desk Aid
Wagner-Peyser Act Employment
Services for MSFWs
Federal regulations require that every One-Stop Career Center offer
to MSFWs the full range of quality employment services, benefits
and protections, on an equal level as non-MSFWs
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Counseling
Testing
Job referrals
Training referral services
Referrals to supportive services
In providing such services, staff shall consider and be sensitive to
the preferences, needs, and skills of individual MSFWs and the
availability of job and training opportunities.
Wagner-Peyser Act Employment
Services for MSFWs
Every One-Stop Career Center shall determine whether or
not applicants are MSFWs as defined at 20 CFR 651.10
(summarized in previous slide). Appropriate coding must be
used in Employ Florida Marketplace.
Staff must explain verbally to MSFW customers the services
available through the One-Stop system and provide them a
copy of the 511N Form (available in English, Spanish and
Creole).
Wagner-Peyser Act Employment
Services for MSFWs
Staff shall provide assistance in completing a full application
for MSFW applicants.
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Significant work history
Training and educational background
Statement of desired employment
Training needs
Crop codes
Further guidance for completing a full application and other
MSFW requirements can be found in Final Guidance 03-040.
Workforce Investment Act Regulations
Workforce Investment Act and the
Required MSFW Partner
The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Title I indicates that
programs authorized under Title I are required partners of the
one-stop delivery system.
The workforce investment MSFW program established under
WIA Title I, Section 167 is the National Farmworker Jobs
Program (NFJP). This program is nationally administered by
the US Department of Labor.
Workforce Investment Act and the
Required MSFW Partner
The NFJP grantee for the State of Florida is the Department
of Education, Adult Migrant Program and Services.
 Florida Farmworker Jobs and Education Program (FJEP)
 Manages 17 projects in Florida
 FJEP is implemented through sub-recipient agencies located in highly
populated farmworker communities. Local providers are non-profit
agencies, county governments, state and community colleges, technical
centers, and school districts.
Regions Where Farmworker Jobs and
Education Programs are Present
1
Okaloosa
Santa Rosa
2
Walton
Holmes
Jackson
Washington
Escambia
3
Calhoun
Nassau
Gadsden
Leon
5
Liberty
Bay
Wakulla
Gulf
4
Jefferson
Hamilton
M adison
Baker
Suwannee
Taylor
6
Duval
Columbia
7
Lafayette
Clay
Franklin
Bradford
Alachua
Dixie
Gilchrist
9
8
St. Johns
Putnam
Flagler
Levy
M arion
10
Regional Workforce Board County Map
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Escambia and Santa Rosa
Okaloosa and Walton
Calhoun, Holmes, Liberty, Jackson and Washington
Bay, Gulf and Franklin
Leon, Gadsden and Wakulla
Madison, Suwannee, Taylor, Hamilton, Jefferson and Lafayette
Gilchrist, Union, Columbia and Dixie
St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Baker and Putnam
Alachua and Bradford
Citrus, Levy and Marion
Volusia and Flagler
Orange, Osceola, Seminole, Lake and Sumter
Brevard
Pinellas
Hillsborough
Pasco and Hernando
Polk
Sarasota and Manatee
DeSoto, Hardee and Highlands
Okeechobee, Martin, St. Lucie and Indian River
Palm Beach
Broward
Miami-Dade and Monroe
Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry and Lee
Volusia
11
Citrus
Sumter
Lake
Seminole
12
Hernando
16
Brevard
Orange
Pasco
Osceola
Polk
13
Hillsborough
14
15
17
Indian River
M anatee
18
Hardee
DeSoto
Highlands
Okeechobee
19
St. Lucie
20
M artin
Glades
Sarasota
Charlotte
Palm Beach
Hendry
Lee
24
21
Collier
Broward
22
M iami- Dade
M onroe
23
MSFW Eligibility per WIA Regulations
A migrant or seasonal farmworker who:
Performed farm work during the 12 month eligibility
determination period (the eligibility determination period is any
consecutive 12 month period within the 24 month period
immediately preceding the date of application for enrollment)
Received at least 50% of their total earned income or been
employed at least 50% of their total work time in farm work
Worked at least 25 days or earned at least $800 in farm work
Income does not exceed the higher of either the Health and
Human Services (HHS) poverty line or 70% of the Lower
Living Standard Income Level (LLSIL)
May be a dependent of the qualifying farmworker
FJEP Services for MSFWs
Skills assessment
Career assessment
ESOL, if needed
Adult Basic Education, if needed
Short-term job skills training (vocational, technical, OJT, work experience)
Tuition assistance after Pell Grant determination
Books, uniforms, tools
Transportation
Career counseling and advisement
Remediation, if needed
Needs-based allowances for classroom attendance
Paid testing and licensing fees
Job search, placement and follow-up
Why Collaboration?
It is required by the Workforce Investment Act
Strong focus from federal level – US DOL
Common goals / common measures
 Can benefit performance measures
 Entered Employment
 Employment Retention
 Average Earnings
To improve services offered
More cost efficient
 Maximize limited resources
 Minimize duplication of services
Everyone benefits
Benefits to Participants
Better assessment of the participant’s needs
Access to a wider range of services and resources
Reduction in the barriers to accessing services
Increased expertise of staff providing services
Integration through Collaboration
FJEP representation on Workforce Board, as required by
WIA, Section 117
Advisory Board meetings / Interagency meetings
Community outreach
Joint effort to eliminate barriers for MSFW customers
Workshop / orientation on One-Stop programs
Integration through Collaboration
Concurrent enrollment
 WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker
 Wagner-Peyser
Cost-sharing
WIA Youth participation through FJEP outreach
Shared participant information
Shared outcomes
WIA Co-Enrollment for MSFWs
FJEP participants can be co-enrolled in WIA Adult, Dislocated
Worker, or Youth
Database sharing
 Facilitates case management
 Prevents duplication of services
 Increase performance by driving outcomes
FJEP staff have smaller case load
 More intensive case management
 Follow-up services
Workshops and pre-vocational classes through One-Stop
References
Federal Regulations 20 CFR 651 - General Provisions
Governing the Federal-State Employment Service System
Federal Regulations 20 CFR 653 – Services of the
Employment Service System
Workforce Investment Act of 1998
Federal Regulations 20 CFR 669 - National Farmworker Jobs
Program Under Title I of the Workforce Investment Act
Questions?
Contact Information
Marisela Ruiz
Senior Monitor Advocate
Workforce Program Support
Division of Workforce Services
Florida Department of Economic Opportunity
[email protected]
(850) 921-3207
Gloria Spradley-Brown
Bureau Chief
Grants Administration and Compliance
Florida Department of Education
[email protected]
(850) 245-9053

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