GfK CRE Presentation - The Council for Research Excellence

Report
Longitudinal Ethnography Study
IIR Media & Entertainment Conference Case Study Competition
February 5, 2015
Research
conducted by
1
ABOUT THE CRE
The Council for Research Excellence is a body of senior
research professionals, formed in 2005 to identify important questions
about audience measurement methodology and to find,
through quality research, the answers to those questions.
The Council provides the Nielsen client community
a means to undertake research projects
no one company could undertake on its own.
2
CRE MEMBER COMPANIES
3
OBJECTIVES & RESEARCH QUESTIONS
KEY RESEARCH
QUESTIONS
?
What new
viewing patterns
What new
are arising?
viewing patterns
are arising?
5
KEY RESEARCH
QUESTIONS
?
Hownew
does video
What
viewing
differ
viewing
patterns
by device in
are arising?
the home,
and outside of
the home as well?
6
KEY RESEARCH
QUESTIONS
?
What
motivates
What
new
thepatterns
selection
viewing
and purchase
are arising?
of new viewing
technologies
and services?
7
RESEARCH
OBJECTIVES
?
Understand
the
What
new
changing
media
viewing
patterns
landscape
resulting
are arising?
from internet
technology and
video platform
proliferation
8
RESEARCH
OBJECTIVES
?
What new
Inform the
viewing patterns
development of
are arising?
strategies for
audience
measurement
9
APPROACH
In-Person & Digital Ethnography
BLENDED ETHNOGRAPHY METHOD
> 100 HHs tracked over 2 years; another 100 HHs for snapshots/short term
Field Nov 2013 – Oct 2015
PHOTO
TOUR
OUR
VISIT
SHORT
ANSWER
QUESTIONS
SHORT
ANSWER
QUESTIONS
SURVEY
INTRO
SURVEY
WEEK 1
WEEK 2
WEEK 3
WEEK 5
VIDEO
JOURNAL
WEEK 7
SURVEY
SURVEY
SURVEY
WEEK 9
WEEK
11
WEEK
11
WEEK
15
FINAL SURVEY
VIDEO
JOURNAL
11
PARTICIPANT TOOLKIT (PTK)
1
Diary (Text)
2
Rich, Mixed Media
3
Tasks
4
Communication
•
•
•
Viewing Stories Narrative Diary
Notes on device interactions
Participant wish list
•
•
•
Visual Narrative, Video Diaries
Environmental Portraiture
Automatic Uploads
•
•
Maintain Study Inertia
Allows participants to work on
their own time
•
•
•
Increase Communication
Provide Support
Maintain Bond with Participant
12
SOME HIGHLIGHTS
HOUSEHOLD ECOSYSTEMS – EXAMPLE
14
HOUSEHOLD ECOSYSTEMS – Finding
Consumers are still developing mental models
of device and service pairings
Exploration is expected, and even welcomed
15
CHOOSING A VIEWING STRATEGY
Content
Time
STRATEGY
Group
Dynamics
Multiple,
Portable
Screens
Screen
Availability
16
STRATEGY EXAMPLE:
TOGETHER, VIEWING SEPARATELY
J watches a show on
Netflix on his Laptop –
typically he would be in
his own room, but wants
to be with the family.
Main TV
A and S co-play
Minecraft on a Tablet
M, the mother,
watches Cash Cab
on OTA TV
17
“HYPER VIEWING”
Special viewing events and favorite shows promote hyper viewing behaviors.
> Simultaneous, multi-screen usage and mobile viewing are more pronounced.
> Continuous conversation via social media, IM, in-person, and remote chats.
> Events and shows prompt people to explore and use applications, websites, and new
platforms.
− For many, new platforms provide an enhanced viewing experience.
“
“
“
Young Mom in her early thirties
Couple – the young man
in his mid thirties
Young single man
I can email, IM, and
tweet… talk to people.
It’s fun to socialize with
people and interact with
them while I’m watching.”
On my lunch break
I’ll sit out and watch
some of the games on
my phone and I’ll have
my bracket with me. ”
The NCAA app allows me to
see the game, and at
the bottom you see the stats.
The app allowed
me to watch live!”
18
OUT-OF-HOME VIEWING
> Many variables shape device and
service choice in OOH viewing
− Time, Motivation, Convenience
> Desire for certain content can
drive different OOH viewing
− Seeking a Community of Viewers
− Viewing OOH out of Necessity
> The mode of connectivity
available shapes the OOH
viewing experience.
19
HOW IS GROUP
VIEWING NEGOTIATED?
> Households engage in multiple styles
of negotiation, and can transition from
one style to another in same session.
> Popular modes of negotiation include
− Compromise
− Mutual agreement
− Priority
− First-come, first-served
> In some cases, households avoid
negotiation by defaulting to personal
devices
OVERALL IMPLICATIONS
INSIGHT
1
Consumers are moving from a single
source, single device model to a multisource, multi-device model.
This indicates the development of new
measurement systems and metrics should
be increasingly audience-centric rather than
device-centric
22
INSIGHT
2
The TV set is still considered the
primary screen in the home.
While there has been a lot of recent
concern and effort to measure mobile
devices (and rightfully so), development of
measurement of digital content on TV sets
needs to keep pace with mobile.
23
INSIGHT
3
The “PTK” is a valuable tool for
enhancing research and respondent
engagement in the research.
A dedicated way to communicate with
panel homes created a rich library that
informs the analysis. And the on-going
relationship builds engagement, trust,
and the perception of “being heard.”
24
AN INDUSTRY
COLLABORATION
25
BUSINESS
IMPACT AND
IMPLICATIONS
The business impact of improving
audience measurement is substantial,
especially when the whole industry
is considered:
> The advertising market
> Content creators
> Media companies
> CE companies
> Digital media
26
WHAT’S NEXT?
> Aligning Cross Platform Metrics
> Further Probes Through October 2015
> Submit Research Questions to [email protected]
Thank you!
28 28

similar documents